Sergio Leone Web Board

Films of Sergio Leone => Once Upon A Time In America => Topic started by: Shambaby on February 13, 2011, 07:32:50 AM

Title: In Sergio's Words
Post by: Shambaby on February 13, 2011, 07:32:50 AM
"The only authentic things in his story were the childhood episodes. So, I said to myself that from the moment that imagination takes precedence over reality, to the point that the author believes he has created something new with the most common of stereotypes that is when we are really at the heart of myth. And at that instant, I understood the need to make a film about this idea ... I had found the right direction. It should be a tribute to film noir and an homage to cinema."
Title: Re: In Sergio's Words
Post by: Groggy on March 13, 2011, 09:41:45 PM
I don't see a lot of noir in OUATIA. It's more a throwback to the '30s Hollywood gangster films.
Title: Re: In Sergio's Words
Post by: The Firecracker on March 13, 2011, 11:13:27 PM
It's more a throwback to the '30s Hollywood gangster films.

Wouldn't a lot of those be considered "film noir"?

That said, I don't see any "Noir" in America either.
Title: Re: In Sergio's Words
Post by: cigar joe on March 14, 2011, 03:41:29 AM
I think you have to think Noir in tone and mood more, and not necessarily image wise.
Title: Re: In Sergio's Words
Post by: Groggy on March 14, 2011, 08:07:17 AM
Wouldn't a lot of those be considered "film noir"?

Not by the definition I'm familiar with.
Title: Re: In Sergio's Words
Post by: dave jenkins on March 14, 2011, 09:54:45 AM
The current, commonly accepted use for "film noir" is to designate films of a certain content and/or style produced in the period 1941-1958. It excludes the gangster films of the 30s (which, however, may be seen as precursors). Of course, when Leone used the term, there's no telling what he may have meant.
Title: Re: In Sergio's Words
Post by: Novecento on March 14, 2011, 02:29:29 PM
I think you have to think Noir in tone and mood more, and not necessarily image wise.

That's true, although for me "Film Noir" is all about shadows and accentuated dark/light contrasts. Consequently, something like Casablanca makes it into my definition of noir even though for many it isn't.

With Film Noirs (although possibly excluding neo-noirs), I tend to pay more attention to who the cinematographer is than who the director is.