Sergio Leone Web Board

Other/Miscellaneous => Off-Topic Discussion => Topic started by: drinkanddestroy on November 18, 2011, 05:15:58 AM



Title: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on November 18, 2011, 05:15:58 AM
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0042593/


In a Lonely Place (1950)



First I will paste the previous discussion from the Film Noir Discussion Thread  http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=1822.msg138030#msg138030



------------------------


moviesceleton:

In a Lonely Place (1950) - 8/10
This is one of those movies that don't exactly blow your mind but that probably will haunt you for a long time. Or then not...we'll see about that.

---------------------------


 dave jenkins:
I think reception depends on how sensitive you are to Bogart's iconic status.

--------------------------------

moviesceleton

I'm not sure I got your point but I'd say this is the Bogiest role I've seen from him.

----------------------------------

dave jenkins

I'd say it is the Bogiest performance, but the role is unusual.
-----------------------------------

Dust Devil:
The music's pretty simple yet (strangely) very touching. If slightly maladjusted.

---------------------------------------------


Cast (courtesy of imdb)

Humphrey Bogart    ...   Dixon Steele
    Gloria Grahame    ...   Laurel Gray
    Frank Lovejoy    ...   Det. Sgt. Brub Nicolai
    Carl Benton Reid    ...   Capt. Lochner
    Art Smith    ...   Agent Mel Lippman
    Jeff Donnell    ...   Sylvia Nicolai
    Martha Stewart    ...   Mildred Atkinson
    Robert Warwick    ...   Charlie Waterman
    Morris Ankrum    ...   Lloyd Barnes
    William Ching    ...   Ted Barton
    Steven Geray    ...   Paul, Headwaiter
    Hadda Brooks    ...   Singer

Dixon Steele (Humphrey Bogart) is a screenwriter who is burned out on life, with no successes in recent years. After Dixon is suspected of a murder, he meets his neighbor Laurel Gray (Gloria Grahame) in the police station, where she provides testimony to clear him, and they strike up a romance. Dixon and Laurel - both of whom have had difficult pasts -- are rejuvenated and blissful by their whirlwind romance. But hanging over their heads are their pasts... and the murder investigation.

This is an absolutely spectacular movie I give it a 9.5/10 with a particularly amazing performance by Bogart.

As usual, you have the great Bogie delivery of sharp, witty lines. But this performance is far more complex, with an incredible range of emotions. You really FEEL as if you are watching Dixon through the eyes of Laurel, ie. there are times that Dixon is so incredibly sweet around her, you wonder how he could have ever done those things on his rap sheet. And as some nastiness comes out, you really begin to just HATE him. You really feel you are in the seat next to Laurel, on that emotional roller coaster ride that Dixon is. It is all done so well, and none of it is in the least bit contrived. Grahame is terrific as well.

This should go to the top of the queue of anyone who hasn't seen it yet.

-----------------------------------------

Previous discussion quoted above begins at this link:

http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=1822.msg138030#msg138030 (http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=1822.msg138030#msg138030)


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on November 18, 2011, 07:20:54 AM
This is another Noir I don't really care for, and adding to it on the negative side (on another level entirely) I don't like the way Gloria Graham looks in this one.

Whose idea was it that women with cropped hair was sexy??? Take a look at these comparisons, but first at extreme left is Mary Astor in The Maltese Falcon, you got to be fucking kidding me???? Anybody find her attractive the way she's decked out? If the Brigid O'Shaughnessy character was the least bit sexy the film even with the blah sets would have improved. Next up Gloria Grahame in "In A Lonely Place" another WTF, check her out in "The Naked Alibi" now there is a sex object. Then look at Rita Hayworth in "Lady From Shaghai" WTF was Orson Welles thinking? she is nowhere near as alluring as in Gilda on the far rt.

(http://i841.photobucket.com/albums/zz337/cigarjoe/sidebyside.jpg)

Again for me the visuals are what I like, so keep it in mind.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: stanton on November 18, 2011, 09:47:19 AM
For me Rita Hayworth was much more erotic in Lady from Shanghai than in Gilda. The short blonde hair looked great. And more modern.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: T.H. on November 18, 2011, 12:20:57 PM
For me Rita Hayworth was much more erotic in Lady from Shanghai than in Gilda. The short blonde hair looked great. And more modern.

I completely agree.


In a Lonely Place gets my vote for the greatest US movie of all time. It's as perfect as a film can be - every scene has multiple memorable lines, Bogart and Graham are at their best and their chemistry is undeniable, and has one of the best endings in film history (never has a male female relationship been better handled by a film's conclusion).


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on November 18, 2011, 02:04:12 PM
Sorry don't agree at all, I stand by my statements.  8)


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: titoli on November 18, 2011, 03:29:07 PM
I had a discussion with jenkins on this movie, lost somewhere.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on November 18, 2011, 03:42:47 PM
I had a discussion with jenkins on this movie, lost somewhere.

Follow the link at the bottom of the first post its there.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: titoli on November 18, 2011, 06:48:28 PM
Follow the link at the bottom of the first post its there.

I did, it led me nowhere.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on November 18, 2011, 06:56:39 PM
I did, it led me nowhere.

Yea you are right, maybe it was in Recently Watched Films, I remember you two discussing it someplace  :-\


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on November 19, 2011, 04:26:22 PM
SPOILER ALERT

I have one problem with the dialogue at the end: I think some things were understood and better left unsaid. Specifically, when she gets the phone call that Bogie is innocent, we all understand how now it's meaningless cuz they are done, while one day earlier, that phone call would have (perhaps) meant they could have lived happily ever after. No need for her to state the obvious. I think either no dialogue, or a round-about line (eg. something like a sarcastic "thanks, that's very helpful") would have been better than just coming out and stating the obvious as they did.

Also, at the end, she says, "I lived a few weeks while you loved me," and "Goodbye Dixon." I think that the "I lived a few weeks while you loved me" suffices; the words "Goodbye Dixon" IMO are superfluous.

That issue with the dialogue at the end is the only criticism I have of a spectacular film.



Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on November 19, 2011, 04:36:34 PM
So after I watched the movie, I read Roger Ebert's review of it (I LOVE reading Ebert -- especially when he keeps his Commie politics out of his reviews  ;) ). Anyway, I believe this is the first movie I have ever seen with Gloria Grahame and didn't know anything about her. Turns out some crazy shit was going on on the set, I'll copy and paste the two relevant paragraphs here. (I have no idea whether this is well-known and part of Hollywood lore, or whether it'll be news to some of you here and I'll sound like an idiot for posting it and admitting to having just learned of it, but wtf)..




This is a crisp black-and-white film with an almost ruthless efficiency of style. It taps into the psyches of the three principals: Bogart, who bought the story to produce with his company; Nicholas Ray, a lean iconoclast of films about wounded men (James Dean in "Rebel Without Cause"), and the legendary Gloria Grahame (1923-1981), whose life story inspired Peter Turner's extraordinary book Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool. Turner was the last of her many loves. She was married to Nicholas Ray but that ended during the making of this film, when Ray found her in bed with his 13-year-old son by an earlier marriage. (She and the boy, Tony, were married from 1960 to 1974.)

Life on the set was obviously fraught with emotional hazards. Ray had modeled the movie's apartment complex on an apartment he once occupied at Villa Primavera in West Hollywood. When he moved out on Grahame, I learn from critic J. Hoberman, Ray actually moved onto the set and started sleeping there. The relationship between Dixon and Laurel mirrored aspects of Bogart's own with the younger, strong-willed, nurturing Lauren Bacall. Yet perhaps they all sensed that they were doing the best work of their careers -- a film could be based on those three people and that experience.



unfriggin'believable... I don't understand how Ray could go on directing Grahame in the movie after finding her in bed with his 13-year old son. I mean, was he so unselfish (or under contract!) that he decided to forget his own emotions for the sake of the movie?  And what were the laws on statutory rape back then? Did he not report it so as not to have her arrested and screw up the movie? Or to protect his son? And then ten years later, she marries that son for 14 years! unfuckingbeliveable. What a piece of trash. I am glad I did not know of this till after I watched the movie. Idk how I woulda been able to watch it knowing what I know now about Grahame  ;D


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on November 19, 2011, 06:29:18 PM
Nicholas Ray was a piece of work also, check out his bio, the whole "family" was shall we say a  bit dysfunctional.  ::)


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on November 19, 2011, 06:52:48 PM
This is another Noir I don't really care for, and adding to it on the negative side (on another level entirely) I don't like the way Gloria Graham looks in this one.

Whose idea was it that women with cropped hair was sexy??? Take a look at these comparisons, but first at extreme left is Mary Astor in The Maltese Falcon, you got to be fucking kidding me???? Anybody find her attractive the way she's decked out? If the Brigid O'Shaughnessy character was the least bit sexy the film even with the blah sets would have improved. Next up Gloria Grahame in "In A Lonely Place" another WTF, check her out in "The Naked Alibi" now there is a sex object. Then look at Rita Hayworth in "Lady From Shaghai" WTF was Orson Welles thinking? she is nowhere near as alluring as in Gilda on the far rt.

(http://i841.photobucket.com/albums/zz337/cigarjoe/sidebyside.jpg)

Again for me the visuals are what I like, so keep it in mind.

but in The Maltese Falcon, the main focus is not her hair. It's her "pretty neck"  ;)


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on November 19, 2011, 07:00:10 PM
Nicholas Ray was a piece of work also, check out his bio, the whole "family" was shall we say a  bit dysfunctional.  ::)

even by dysfunctional Hollywood standards, banging your husband's 13-year old son is an entirely new level of absolute depravity (we should have a "vomiting" icon!)


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on November 19, 2011, 07:05:15 PM
I heard a wild rumor that that sick fuck of a father, Ray, was coming on to the boy, he (the boy) very vulnerable & confused confided to Gloria and Gloria made a man out of him....  8) Its Hollywood.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on November 19, 2011, 07:32:58 PM
I heard a wild rumor that that sick fuck of a father, Ray, was coming on to the boy, he (the boy) very vulnerable & confused confided to Gloria and Gloria made a man out of him....  8) Its Hollywood.

please tell me you're kidding (it's Hollywood, so I'd believe anything)


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on November 19, 2011, 08:09:50 PM
please tell me you're kidding (it's Hollywood, so I'd believe anything)

Not kidding, I read this a while back someplace. "Its Hollywood"


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: titoli on November 12, 2015, 04:46:28 PM
I finished reading the novel on which it is said the movie was based. As far as I can remember what the movie and the novel have in common is the title and the names of the characters. But for the rest they are as different as can be and I wonder why the filmakers wanted to give unearned money to Dorothy Hughes. The novel is one of the best serial killer tales I've read as it soesn't try to explain the actions of the killer and it also show him as a "normal" guy, without moralizing. 8/10


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: dave jenkins on February 17, 2016, 12:38:02 PM
First Bogart in the Criterion Collection!

Quote
SPECIAL FEATURES

New 2K digital restoration, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
New audio commentary featuring film scholar Dana Polan
I'm a Stranger Here Myself, a 1975 documentary about director Nicholas Ray, slightly condensed for this release
New interview with biographer Vincent Curcio about actor Gloria Grahame
Piece from 2002 featuring filmmaker Curtis Hanson
Radio adaptation from 1948 of the original Dorothy B. Hughes novel, broadcast on the program Suspense
Trailer
PLUS: An essay by critic Imogen Sara Smith



Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: T.H. on February 17, 2016, 12:46:59 PM
It's about time the greatest noir and one of the best movies ever made has a proper R1 bluray release.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: titoli on February 20, 2016, 04:45:47 PM
Yea you are right, maybe it was in Recently Watched Films, I remember you two discussing it someplace  :-\

It was in the Sunset Boulevard thread.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on March 09, 2016, 02:09:43 PM
I just locked in Amazon pre-order of the new Criterion BRD for $27.99  :)


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on May 09, 2016, 09:02:35 AM
Okay, looks like price for IN A LONELY PLACE dvd is $27.99; Amazon billed my card today (plus sales tax for New York City  >:(  ) delivery estimate is May 16 - May 20


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 09, 2016, 09:15:38 AM
Maybe this time Bogie and Gloria can work things out at the end. Let us know, OK?


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on May 15, 2016, 07:41:31 AM
May 16th came early this year. BD in da house  ;)


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 15, 2016, 04:59:19 PM
Good. I've seen the film on DVD so many times I'm in no hurry, so I'm willing to wait for a sale. Anything you'd like to tell us about the release, though, I'd be happy to hear (spoilers are OK).


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on May 15, 2016, 06:06:52 PM
Good. I've seen the film on DVD so many times I'm in no hurry, so I'm willing to wait for a sale. Anything you'd like to tell us about the release, though, I'd be happy to hear (spoilers are OK).

I am not sure what I can tell about bonus features that Beaver hasn't. I can't make screencaps on my BRD player; I saw the movie once such a long time ago that I won't be able to compare the BRD image quality to the DVD quality from memory. I do remember that it is a terrific movie  ;)

Next time we meet, you can lend me your copy of THE CHASE and I can lend you my copy of IN A LONELY PLACE  ;)


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 16, 2016, 06:17:00 AM

Next time we meet, you can lend me your copy of THE CHASE and I can lend you my copy of IN A LONELY PLACE  ;)
Well, I'll lend you my copy of The Chase, anyway. I can wait until July to get my own copy of IALP on B&N's Criterion sale.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: kjrwe on February 28, 2017, 02:13:35 AM
I absolutely adore this film. I've seen it at least 50 times. It's so well acted: probably one of Bogart's best performances.

Great storyline with an appropriate haunting soundtrack.

A big thanks to Nicholas Ray for directing this gem!

Generally I watch this back-to-back with another Ray film: On Dangerous Ground.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: kjrwe on April 16, 2017, 02:33:45 AM
I watched it again just now. It gets better with each viewing, in my opinion.

I have to admit that this time, the scriptwriter's violent actions were REALLY making me want to look at the TV and say, "Dump him already, girl!" Geez, Gloria Grahame's character was a bit dense. Just how many violent episodes was he supposed to have before she finally clued in that he isn't right for her?


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: dave jenkins on April 17, 2017, 05:45:45 AM
I have to admit that this time, the scriptwriter's violent actions were REALLY making me want to look at the TV and say, "Dump him already, girl!" Geez, Gloria Grahame's character was a bit dense. Just how many violent episodes was he supposed to have before she finally clued in that he isn't right for her?
This is a general female trait put in place by providence/evolution to ensure the survivability of the race. Cue Joe Jackson's "Is She Really Going Out With Him?"


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: kjrwe on April 17, 2017, 06:30:56 PM
This is a general female trait put in place by providence/evolution to ensure the survivability of the race. Cue Joe Jackson's "Is She Really Going Out With Him?"

He nearly killed in near the end of the film! If it hadn't been for that phone call...


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on September 18, 2017, 12:20:01 AM
Eddie Muller says of his favorite movie: "This movie is film noir for fully grown adults."

intro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qva-Rmq4n44&feature=youtu.be

Afterword: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZi8XPI9tY8&feature=youtu.be


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on September 18, 2017, 05:30:51 AM
re: In A Lonely Place It's a good Hollywood Noir, and about the same Hollywood sleaze balls, and tragic figures, we got around today, only back then they were giving us classy crap but now they are giving us mostly, just the crap.  
 
I see it similar to A Streetcar Named Desire, it's the dark side of life, an early psychological noir, one of the strands Noir unwinded into after the demise of the glue of the MPPC. One is as Noir as the other. And Streetcar is much more stylistic visually, to me.
 
"I told my story better." Another nice classic line.

I also think that the original ending would have been way noir-er, though. Would have overcome its lack of great visuals.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: Jessica Rabbit on September 18, 2017, 09:30:13 AM
Thanks, D & D.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: Jessica Rabbit on September 18, 2017, 09:33:20 AM
Quote
only back then they were giving us classy crap but now they are giving us mostly, just the crap.
Yes! Sleaziness always looked like so much fun back then, now it just looks gross.

Quote
I also think that the original ending would have been way noir-er, though.
What was the original ending? Didn't know there was another.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: dave jenkins on September 18, 2017, 12:50:27 PM
What was the original ending? Didn't know there was another.
Eddie covers that in his intro.

Yes, that ending would have made it noir-ier, but not better. Muller is right: the film refuses to fulfill the noir tropes; it is a film for grown-ups. The two are connected. Noir is really something that appeals to teenagers and the teenagers in all of us. IALP feints with a noir left jab, then delivers an uppercut from reality's right. We're looking for one thing and it delivers another. It knocks me out every time.

Key to this is Bogart and his iconic presence. Since Casablanca he'd been playing romantic leads, of course, but he'd never given up the Psycho Bogart roles he'd initiated with The Petrified Forest. He continued to play nut-jobs in films like The Two Mrs. Carrolls and Conflict; at the end of his career he'd still be playing loons: Cpt. Queeg, of course, and also the villain in The Desperate Hours. The fun of IALP is knowing there are two types of Bogart roles, and wondering while we watch which one we're getting here. He's at turns the strong hero we've seen before, but at other moments he seems to be cracking up. We have to go the distance to find out his final disposition. Good dramaturgy.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: Jessica Rabbit on September 18, 2017, 03:01:24 PM
Quote
Eddie covers that in his intro.
I should have checked before. :) Did now.

Quote
IALP feints with a noir left jab, then delivers an uppercut from reality's right. We're looking for one thing and it delivers another. It knocks me out every time.
Well said, though I think I would have loved the alternate ending. Agreed, it would have been exactly what we expect from Noir, but somehow I love it.

You're right about the two Bogarts too. People who don't know many of his films always consider him the romantic cynic, but really, just as often he played complete nut jobs. Just watched The Desperate Hours, he was good.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on September 18, 2017, 03:46:49 PM
Yes! Sleaziness always looked like so much fun back then, now it just looks gross.
What was the original ending? Didn't know there was another.

Dixon Steele strangles Laurel Gray to death and the police get there while he's hunched over her body. Don't get much noir-er than that.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: dave jenkins on September 19, 2017, 05:52:48 AM
Dixon Steele strangles Laurel Gray to death and the police get there while he's hunched over her body.
You left out the reason for the arrival of the police. It's Steele's pal Brub come to tell his buddy he's been cleared of charges in the Mildred Atkinson case. Oh, the irony! Oh, the humanity!

Actually, the original ending is similar to the original ending of the novel that became Vertigo. Funny that both Hitchcock and Ray decided to change things. A noir too far?


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on September 20, 2017, 12:56:06 AM
RE: the original ending:

I'd sure love to see it; I wish it were included as a bonus feature, or that someone working in the studio vault would put it on YouTube  ;) Without having seen it, here's my opinion of the original ending vs. the current ending:

As discussed, the original ending is more noir-like. (Though again, nobody in American knew about "noir" then or felt the need to follow any noir formula.) But, as Muller says, Ray chose the current ending because it is more, in Muller's words, "true to life." It's absolutely correct that the current ending is more realistic. And for that reason, it is more heartbreaking. If Dixon had killed Laurel, that's a (perhaps great) movie ending, but not one that people can relate to; but the current ending, in which Dixon destroys, in Muller's words, "the best chance for love that he'll ever have," is a heartbreakingly true to life: People throwing away achievable love and happiness due to silly things like stubbornness and temper, Dixon walking alone through that courtyard, knowing he has just thrown away the one thing that could have made his life not be miserable.


On the other hand, there are a couple of arguments I can make why the original ending would have been better: Firstly, and most importantly, when watching the movie yes, even the first time I never believed for a moment that Steele murdered the hat-check girl. When he "re-enacts" the murder, there wasn't a moment when I thought he had actually committed it. Sure, he has bad drinking and temper problems, but the notion that he actually could have killed the hat-check girl never crossed my mind. So I never really felt the the supposed tension over "Did he do it or not?" So, if he actually kills Laurel and then we find out he was cleared of murder in the hat-check-girl case only then (yes, at the end of the movie would I actually feel that he is indeed capable of murder, and perhaps then, on subsequent viewings of the movie, it would actually make me feel that yes, it was a legitimate question after all as to whether or not he killed the hat-check girl and we are only sure he didn't once he gets cleared at the end. So, showing him kill Laurel actually shows us that Steele is indeed capable of murder, and on subsequent viewings it can sort of put legitimate doubt into the air over whether or not he killed the hat-check girl, until we know he is cleared for sure. (Am I making sense?)

Secondly, one thing I never liked about the movie and again, this is a terrific movie, the few quibbles notwithstanding are those dumb lines, "I was born .... I lived a few weeks when you loved me." Yeah, I get it for a man like Steele, even when he has finally found what could make him happy, he senses that one way or another, likely due to his own stupidity, he will throw it away. But those lines are corny way too unsubtle. And having Laurel say the lines at the end again, way too unsubtle. A movie should never say something is going to happen and then have it happen exactly that way. I just didn't like how Steele says those lines, and then have the movie turn out exactly that way, with Laurel saying the exact line. But, though I don't like the lines at all, at least it's better in the the original ending, with Bogie sitting over the typewriter with those lines types out but nobody actually speaksing the line.

So, those are two reasons I could give why the original ending would be better, besides the simple reason that it's "more noir-like." But, as noted above, there's a very good reason why the current ending could be better as well. So, bottom line is that I'll accept the ending as it is in the movie. Even if you prefer the original, the current ending is damn good. So I am happy to accept it as is.

Of course, if I ever see the original ending, perhaps then I'd have more a more firm opinion about it. I hope that one day we'll be able to see it.

Anyway, unlike Muller, IALP is not my favorite movie or even my favorite noir. But it's a damn good one  :)

BTW, I own the Criterion BRD. I was just looking at Beaver's page where he compares the discs http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film5/blu-ray_reviews_71/in_a_lonely_place_blu-ray.htm and he says that the disc has "the impressive contrast that we have come to expect" from Criterion "darker black levels and brighter white."

But the blacks are actually blacker in the Columbia Tri-Star DVD's! As Beaver himself notes, when discussing what he calls the "impressive contrast" of the Criterion BRD, he says it is not "blown-out as the SD looks in comparison."

When the movie just played on TCM, I watched a few minutes here or there briefly, just enough to tell you that the TCM print also has very dark blacks. (Though I don't know how to measure it against the discs, as I don't have side-by-side screencaps.) Of course, I have no idea whether or not TCM is using the same source as the Columbia DVD's and/or Criterion BRD. But, suffice it to say that all four sources the two Columbia DVD's, the Criterion BRD, and the TCM print all show this being a high-contrast film.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: dave jenkins on September 20, 2017, 09:31:37 AM
If Dixon had killed Laurel, that's a (perhaps great) movie ending, but not one that people can relate to; but the current ending, in which Dixon destroys, in Muller's words, "the best chance for love that he'll ever have," is a heartbreakingly true to life: People throwing away achievable love and happiness due to silly things like stubbornness and temper and an insatiable need to dick bimbos, Dixon walking alone through that courtyard, knowing he has just thrown away the one thing that could have made his life not be miserable.
Spot on, Drink! You have never penned truer words!


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on September 20, 2017, 10:05:59 AM
like the insert dj O0


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: Jessica Rabbit on September 20, 2017, 02:56:36 PM
You guys crack me up.


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on September 20, 2017, 02:59:45 PM
like the insert dj O0

An unfortunate pun :o


Title: Re: In a Lonely Place (1950)
Post by: kjrwe on September 25, 2017, 11:14:37 PM

Secondly, one thing I never liked about the movie and again, this is a terrific movie, the few quibbles notwithstanding are those dumb lines, "I was born .... I lived a few weeks when you loved me." Yeah, I get it for a man like Steele, even when he has finally found what could make him happy, he senses that one way or another, likely due to his own stupidity, he will throw it away. But those lines are corny way too unsubtle. And having Laurel say the lines at the end again, way too unsubtle. A movie should never say something is going to happen and then have it happen exactly that way. I just didn't like how Steele says those lines, and then have the movie turn out exactly that way, with Laurel saying the exact line. But, though I don't like the lines at all, at least it's better in the the original ending, with Bogie sitting over the typewriter with those lines types out but nobody actually speaksing the line.

I disagree with you completely. I love those lines!  :)