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Other/Miscellaneous => Off-Topic Discussion => Topic started by: cigar joe on June 29, 2012, 04:11:35 AM



Title: Guilty Bystander (1950)
Post by: cigar joe on June 29, 2012, 04:11:35 AM
Director: Joseph Lerner Stars: Zachary Scott, Faye Emerson and Mary Bolanda very dark noir, almost too dark in spots, the copy I watched was murky. It has only two NYC shots that you can make out one is in the opening Under The Brooklyn Bridge the other is of a draw bridge and warehouses on the Gowanus Canal. Nothing to go out of your way to try and find. I've always found Scott to be a more than a little annoying as an actor (for me he's never convincing) and a bit over the top. 5/10

typical look of the copy:

Under the Brooklyn Bridge opening sequence
(http://i841.photobucket.com/albums/zz337/cigarjoe/Guiltybystander195000146306-00-29.jpg)

Drawbridge on Gowanus Canal
(http://i841.photobucket.com/albums/zz337/cigarjoe/Guiltybystander195004286106-05-47.jpg)

To be fair and balanced I'll give the review of  IMDb's bmarcy (he likes Scott a bit better.  ;)

Author: bmacv from Western New York
This movie presents a curious case. It obviously was made on a rock-bottom budget (and looks it); its plot -- about a kidnapped boy -- is as hard to follow as The Big Sleep's, without any of that movie's big-studio glamour and high gloss; and prints of the movie in circulation, with poor sound and visuals, don't help its reputation either. Nonetheless, Guilty Bystander has a few very strong points in its favor. Chief among them is the old pro Mary Boland as Smitty, the proprietress of a fleabag hotel several notches below the threshold of respectability; she's a scheming old battleax who has more going on under her unkempt wisps of grey hair than she wants her cronies and go-fers to know. Next there's Zachary Scott, as Max Thursday, an ex-cop now sleeping off benders in the same fleabag, where he's kept on as the house dick; an underrated actor, he invests his loser's role with a painful intensity, stumbling and limping from skid row to waterfront to warehouse in pursuit for the son he hasn't seen in years. As his ex-wife and mother of the kidnapped boy, Faye Emerson (Mrs. Elliott Roosevelt to you), brings more than her fabled bone structure to the part. In fact, with better acting than you have any right to expect (plus an unrelentingly depressing milieu), Guilty Bystander is more than a curio; it's as if the cast knew what a lousy movie they signed up for and decided to go for broke anyway.