Sergio Leone Web Board

Films of Sergio Leone => Once Upon A Time In America => Topic started by: Martin K on January 19, 2014, 05:56:15 AM



Title: Shooting Days
Post by: Martin K on January 19, 2014, 05:56:15 AM
Is it known how many shooting days this movie had?


Title: Re: Shooting Days
Post by: drinkanddestroy on January 19, 2014, 01:35:14 PM
I am sure the OUATIA chapter in STDWD discusses it


Title: Re: Shooting Days
Post by: Martin K on January 20, 2014, 01:14:35 AM
I am sure the OUATIA chapter in STDWD discusses it

I am reading it now. Haven't seen it yet.


Title: Re: Shooting Days
Post by: drinkanddestroy on January 20, 2014, 02:41:23 AM
pp. 452-453  :)


Title: Re: Shooting Days
Post by: chris on January 20, 2014, 03:03:22 AM
In addition to the information contained in STDWD, there were several interviews in 1984 where Leone talked about shooting the movie.

In the May 1984 edition of Cahiers du Cinema magazine, Leone stated that the film involved two or three weeks of travel and six months of filming. He thought this was reasonable bearing in mind that the movie is equivalent to two normal films.

Leone was also interviewed in 1984 by Jean A Gili and this was published in the June 1984 edition of Positif magazine.

Gili: How long did the shooting take?

Leone: It lasted six or seven months, with a few short breaks and one month devoted to traveling.  In fact Once Upon a Time In America is equal to two films.  If you consider that I shot Once Upon A Time In The West in fourteen weeks, automatically I needed thirty weeks for this one.


I think filming began on Jun 14 1982

1982
Jun - July    Rome
July (4 days)    Paris (Gare du Nord/Brasserie Julien)
July - Aug    Venice, Rome
Late Aug-Oct    Canada, New Jersey, Florida
Mid Oct-Dec    New York

1983

Rome, Venice, Lake Como, Rome

and ended on Apr 22 1983.

 


Title: Re: Shooting Days
Post by: Martin K on January 20, 2014, 08:16:00 AM
My god. That would be about 150 shooting days…..


Title: Re: Shooting Days
Post by: chris on January 21, 2014, 02:51:16 AM
I think the 30 weeks (7 months) includes travel and, for this movie, it was fairly extensive - New York, New Jersey, Florida, Canada, Rome, Pratica di Mare, Venice, Paris etc.

Leone's method of filming is slow - like Vittorio de Sica, Leone wants his vision of a scene to be captured meticulously on film - and many people are enthusiastic about his methods.

Tonino Delli Colli:
"Leone moves a lot; he shoots in movement. He has very precise feelings. A little movement that someone else might find insignificant says something to him. And when the film is shown you notice this. The audience is not aware of it on a technical level, but feels it psychologically. He shoots his films well, that's why the audience accepts certain slow moments. American actors, like De Niro, are also enthusiastic about his pictures. He works a little slowly, but the results are excellent. Furthermore this movie cost about half what it would have cost the Americans to make. To do what we do with eighty people, they need to use one hundred and fifty."

Luca Morsella has mentioned a scene in New York which had to be shot 35 times and there were problems with the amount of time Williamsburg Bridge had to be closed. A Garbage Truck matching exactly Leone's vision had to be specially built and one observer has said that the shooting of the Garbage truck and exploding car scenes took over one month. Much of this may have been the rebuilding the exterior of Secretary Bailey's villa and the gates and walls of the main entrance to the Capocotta estate in Pratica di Mare.

We know that shooting the scenes at the Gare du Nord and the Brasserie Julien in Paris took 4 days. These scenes last a total of 2 minutes 10 seconds in the extended version of the movie. Wonderful scenes though. Some say that the film went significantly over budget but Leone seems to deny this.

 


Title: Re: Shooting Days
Post by: drinkanddestroy on January 21, 2014, 04:49:31 PM
also, in STDWD it says that De Niro wanted to do all his younger scenes at once, then all the older scenes at once, rather than switching back and forth between the older and younger characters. So, that meant more travel/money back and forth; rather than shooting all scenes in each location at one time