Sergio Leone Web Board

Other/Miscellaneous => Off-Topic Discussion => Topic started by: drinkanddestroy on March 29, 2016, 10:59:13 AM



Title: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on March 29, 2016, 10:59:13 AM
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_OBIT_PATTY_DUKE?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT


Title: Re: Patty Duke Dies at 69
Post by: drinkanddestroy on March 29, 2016, 11:02:54 AM
Maybe we should make a single thread for all deaths and obituaries?

When a major movie personality - whose death is likely to prompt lots of posts- dies, then it makes sense to give them their own thread. But when it's someone who is just likely to get a few posts, a few RIP's," and that's all ... i think it doesn't make sense to have the Off-topic Discussion board just have an endless number of death/obituary threads that'll never have more than 5 posts.

No disrespect to the dead, but should we just have one thread for all deaths/obits?


Title: Re: Patty Duke Dies at 69
Post by: dave jenkins on March 29, 2016, 12:44:50 PM
A more thorough obit is here: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/patty-duke-dead-miracle-worker-878902


Title: Re: Patty Duke Dies at 69
Post by: Groggy on March 29, 2016, 02:01:05 PM
RIP


Title: Re: Patty Duke Dies at 69
Post by: cigar joe on March 29, 2016, 05:01:29 PM
R.I.P.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 18, 2016, 09:26:31 PM
As mentioned above, IMO we should use one thread to report on deaths of people who are not likely to generate much discussion; I don't think we should have a new thread with just 3-4 posts every time someone dies.
So I am renaming this thread "In Memoriam" ... hopefully we'll never have to use it.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 18, 2016, 09:28:34 PM
Doris Roberts, who played Ray Romano's mother on the TV show Everybody Loves Raymond, Dies at 90

https://www.yahoo.com/tv/doris-roberts-star-of-everybody-loves-raymond-232525555.html


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Groggy on April 19, 2016, 10:01:30 AM
That's sad. I watched Raymond a lot when I was younger; she and Peter Boyle were the best parts.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on April 19, 2016, 10:49:46 AM
As mentioned above, IMO we should use one thread to report on deaths of people who are not likely to generate much discussion; I don't think we should have a new thread with just 3-4 posts every time someone dies.
So I am renaming this thread "In Memoriam" ... hopefully we'll never have to use it.
I don't like this idea because now I have to go into the thread to find out who died. I prefer seeing the name of the person out front so I can know quickly who has passed and can then decide whether to go in and search for more info or engage in a discussion. Not everyone who dies is of interest to me. Sorry, an In Memoriam thread doesn't work for me, I won't be playing.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 19, 2016, 05:34:51 PM
I don't like this idea because now I have to go into the thread to find out who died. I prefer seeing the name of the person out front so I can know quickly who has passed and can then decide whether to go in and search for more info or engage in a discussion. Not everyone who dies is of interest to me. Sorry, an In Memoriam thread doesn't work for me, I won't be playing.

I'm fine either way ... Whatever y'all want


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on April 19, 2016, 07:57:04 PM
BTW Doris Roberts debut film was Something Wild just reviewed, she is in the image with Baker working at the 5 and 10.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 06, 2016, 10:06:32 AM
Peter Shaffer, playwright of Equus and Amadeus, dies at 90


https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2016/jun/06/peter-shaffer-equus-amadeus-playwright-dies-aged-90



Equus and Amadeus playwright Peter Shaffer dies aged 90
By Maev Kennedy


The playwright Sir Peter Shaffer, whose critical and popular successes in the West End and Broadway included Equus, Amadeus, and The Royal Hunt of the Sun, has died aged 90.

His agent, Rupert Lord, said: “He was simply at the end of his life but delighted to have been able to celebrate his 90th birthday with friends and then, I think, decided it was time.”

The National Theatre, which staged the world premieres of many of his plays, and was already planning the first revival of Amadeus at the theatre since it opened there in 1979, described him as “an extraordinary writer”.

Rufus Norris, the director of the National Theatre, where many of his plays were staged, said: “Peter Shaffer was one of the great writers of his generation and the National Theatre was enormously lucky to have had such a fruitful and creative relationship with him. The plays he leaves behind are an enduring legacy.”

Amadeus, a haunting psychological drama about the relationship between Mozart and his less gifted admirer and bitter rival composer Salieri, became a hugely successful Hollywood film that won eight Oscars in 1985, including best film and a screenwriting award for Shaffer. It was revived in 2014 to re-open the Chichester Festival theatre, another venue closely associated with his work.
Daniel Radcliffe in Equus.
Daniel Radcliffe in Equus. Photograph: Tristram Kenton for the Guardian

Equus, Shaffer’s 1973 play of a psychiatrist’s attempt to treat a young man obsessively fascinated with horses, was another major stage hit – revived in 2007 with Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe in his first big role in theatre – which became a successful film.

Shaffer was born in Liverpool, the twin of Anthony who also became a highly successful author and playwright, best known for the stage and film play Sleuth, who died in 2001.

Shaffer’s 1964 The Royal Hunt of the Sun, was the first premiere of a new play ever produced by the infant National Theatre company, before it even had its own theatre. The play, about the conquest of Peru by the Spanish, had already been rejected by the RSC and the Royal Court. It was first seen at Chichester and then at the Old Vic, filmed in 1969, and was revived by Sir Trevor Nunn in 2006.

Shaffer’s next play at the National, Black Comedy in 1965, had the dream cast of Maggie Smith, Derek Jacobi and Albert Finney.

Shaffer only became seriously ill last week. Lord said that he had been particularly happy about the revival of Amadeus, due on the National stage in October. “Peter was happiest that Amadeus was to be seen again on the stage for which it was written and had met and worked with Michael Longhurst, loved his ideas and had been very excited at the prospect of Lucian Msamati playing Salieri.”


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 19, 2016, 01:53:16 PM
http://goo.gl/ETpNzG


'Star Trek' actor Anton Yelchin killed by own car at age 27

By LINDSEY BAHR and SANDY COHEN

LOS ANGELES (AP) -
Anton Yelchin, a rising actor best known for playing Chekov in the new "Star Trek" films, was killed by his own car as it rolled backward down his driveway early Sunday, police and his publicist said.

The car pinned Yelchin, 27, against a brick mailbox pillar and a security fence at his home in Studio City, according to Los Angeles police Officer Jenny Hosier. He had gotten out of the vehicle momentarily, but police did not say why he was behind it when it started rolling.

Yelchin was on his way to meet friends for a rehearsal, Hosier said. When he didn't show up, the group came to his home and found him dead.

The freak accident tragically cuts short the promising career of an actor whom audiences were still getting to know.

Yelchin began acting as a child, taking small roles in independent films and various television shows, such as "ER," ''The Practice," and "Curb Your Enthusiasm." His breakout big-screen role came opposite Anthony Hopkins in 2001's "Hearts in Atlantis."

He transitioned into teenage roles in films such as the crime thriller "Alpha Dog" and the teen comedy "Charlie Bartlett." He also played a young Kyle Reese in 2009's "Terminator Salvation."

Yelchin, an only child, was born in Russia. His parents were professional figure skaters who moved the family to the United States when Yelchin was a baby. He briefly flirted with skating lessons, too, before discovering that he wasn't very skilled on the ice. That led him to acting class.

"I loved the improvisation part of it the most, because it was a lot like just playing around with stuff. There was something about it that I just felt completely comfortable doing and happy doing," Yelchin told The Associated Press in 2011 while promoting the romantic drama "Like Crazy." He starred opposite Felicity Jones.

"(My father) still wanted me to apply to college and stuff, and I did," Yelchin said. "But this is what I wanted."

His biggest role to date has been in the rebooted "Star Trek" films as the heavily accented navigator Chekov, for which he was able to draw on his Russian roots. The third film in the series, "Star Trek Beyond," comes out in July.

"What's great about him is he can do anything. He's a chameleon. He can do bigger movies or smaller, more intimate ones," ''Like Crazy" director Drake Doremus told the AP in 2011. "There are a lot of people who can't, who can only do one or the other. ... That's what blows my mind."

Yelchin transitioned between the big sci-fi franchise and voicing a part for "The Smurfs." He also appeared in more eccentric and artier fare, like Jim Jarmusch's vampire film "Only Lovers Left Alive" and Jeremy Saulnier's horror thriller "Green Room," a cult favorite that came out earlier this year.

The actor's publicist, Jennifer Allen, confirmed his death and said his family requests privacy.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Groggy on June 19, 2016, 02:54:19 PM
Awful news, 27 is way too young for anyone. RIP


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Dust Devil on June 21, 2016, 01:18:23 PM
R.I.P.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on July 14, 2016, 10:06:46 AM
Film Director Hector Babenco died on Wednesday.

here is an article on CBS News: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/kiss-of-the-spider-woman-director-hector-babenco-dead-at-70/

and here is an article from AP: http://bigstory.ap.org/article/2b78f0052c5841e5807e780bc86525d6/film-director-hector-babenco-dies-brazil

Film director Hector Babenco dies in Brazil

SAO PAULO (AP) — The Argentine-born Brazilian director nominated for an Oscar for his 1985 film "Kiss of the Spider Woman" has died. Hector Babenco was 70.

Denise Winther of Babenco's HB Films says the director died Wednesday night of a heart attack at Sao Paulo's Sirio-Libanes Hospital.

"Kiss of the Spider Woman" also was nominated for best picture and William Hurt won the Best Actor Oscar

Babenco also directed "Ironweed" with Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep, who were nominated for best actor and actress Oscars.
 

His last film was "My Hindu Friend" starring Willem Dafoe. It tells the story of a film director close to death.

Babenco is survived by his wife Barbara and daughter Janka.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on August 15, 2016, 11:15:35 AM
Fyvush Finkel, plastic-faced character actor, dead at 93

RIP

AP: http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_OBIT_FYVUSH_FINKEL?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/15/theater/fyvush-finkel-pillar-of-yiddish-theater-dies-at-93.html?_r=0

LA Times: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-et-st-fyvush-finkel-dead-20160814-snap-story.html

Variety: http://variety.com/2016/tv/people-news/fyvush-finkel-dead-picket-fences-boston-public-1201837290/



Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on August 15, 2016, 03:50:29 PM
I hand no idea there was a Walk of Fame for Yiddish Theater on 2nd Ave.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on August 23, 2016, 10:05:49 AM
Steven Hill has passed away  :'( RIP

Famous actor from Mission Impossible, and Law and Order. Later he did TV ads for TD Ameritrade. he had an incredible voice.

He must have just passed away; there aren't any obituaries available yet. For now, here is the intro to the pilot episode of Mission Impossible https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhPwhv2aRZc


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on August 23, 2016, 10:28:28 AM
here is the NY Times obituary on Hill http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/24/arts/television/steven-hill-trailblazing-tv-star-dies-at-94.html?_r=0


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on December 08, 2016, 11:53:20 AM
Adolf Burger died Tuesday at 99. He was one of the Jews forced by the Nazis to produce counterfeit British pounds, in an effort to destabilize the British economy. Burger's wife was killed in Auschwitz; now, more than 70 years later, he'll be reunited with her

Here is a brief article from the Associated Press http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/E/EU_CZECH_OBIT_BURGER?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

Burger wrote a memoir in 1983, and a movie based on his life was made in 2007. The Austrian-German movie, called "The Counterfeiters," won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0813547/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

has anyone seen this movie? is it good? It has a pretty high rating on IMDB.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: titoli on December 08, 2016, 01:08:48 PM
Adolf Burger died Tuesday at 99.

Killed by the nanny.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Big Boss 1971 on December 15, 2016, 02:49:25 AM
Feng Tien (kung fu veteran , Fist of Fury)

Wu Ngan (Bruce Lee's butler and co-star , FoF & Way of Dragon)


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on December 18, 2016, 03:42:39 PM
Zsa Zsa Gabor has died. Assumed to be 99

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/18/movies/zsa-zsa-gabor-often-married-actress-known-for-glamour-dies.html?_r=0

RIP


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on December 20, 2016, 12:54:08 PM
Michèle Morgan est morte ce mardi à l'âge de 96 ans.

Drink, buddy, don't do anything drastic.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on December 20, 2016, 02:12:56 PM
Michèle Morgan est morte ce mardi à l'âge de 96 ans.

Drink, buddy, don't do anything drastic.

 :'( :'( :'(

RIP


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on December 20, 2016, 02:14:14 PM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/michele-morgan-lustrous-french-actress-of-port-of-shadows-dies-at-96/2016/12/20/b5e66d78-c6f1-11e6-bf4b-2c064d32a4bf_story.html?utm_term=.1ba44e29d828

The Washington Post

Michèle Morgan, lustrous French actress of ‘Port of Shadows,’ dies at 96
By Adam Bernstein

Michèle Morgan, a French movie actress who starred in the moody masterpiece “Port of Shadows” and who, during a brief Hollywood sojourn, helped introduce Frank Sinatra to film audiences in his first big role, died Dec. 20. She was 96.

The family announced the death, according to French media reports. No other details were provided.

In a career spanning seven decades, Ms. Morgan was best known as the ethereal femme fatale in “Port of Shadows” (1938), a film at the core of the poetic realism movement in French cinema. As visually sumptuous as they were bleak, the movies often involved working-class characters and social outcasts whose destinies are beyond their control — in essence, a precursor to the cynical and sinister world of American film noir.

“Port of Shadows” featured Jean Gabin, the biggest star in France, as an army deserter on the lam in a seedy port of call. He enjoys a passionate interlude with a 17-year-old waif sporting a beret and transparent raincoat (Ms. Morgan) before she ultimately seals his doom through her association with two unsavory underworld figures.

The film was directed by Marcel Carne and written by the surrealist poet and screenwriter Jacques Prévert, the team behind “Daybreak” (1939) and “Children of Paradis” (1945), regarded as examples of French cinema at its most sublime.

Shrouded in fog, squalor and melancholy, “Port of Shadows” is less concerned with the machinery of plot than with conveying a sustained mood of uncompromising bleakness.

Film critic Pauline Kael once called the movie “a breath of fresh air to American filmgoers saturated with empty optimism.” It also launched Ms. Morgan as an international star for the next two decades.

After a further series of dark-lady roles, several opposite her lover Gabin, she spent World War II making movies in the United States. She was stuck in propaganda and espionage fare for RKO Studios, including “Joan of Paris” (1942) with Paul Henreid and “Passage to Marseille” (1944) opposite Humphrey Bogart.

She was a leading contender for the Ingrid Bergman role in “Casablanca” (1942), but RKO demanded a huge loan-out fee that the rival Warner Bros. would not meet. Instead, she appeared in “Higher and Higher” (1943), a musical with Sinatra in which she played a maid impersonating a debutante.

“Why look back?” she told the New York Times a few years later. “I was so young then, so miserable with my poor attempts at English. I used to say ‘crying trees’ for weeping willows. You didn’t mow the lawn. No, you shaved it. And those pictures. Those stinkers.”

By war’s end, she returned to France and immediately reignited her career with “Pastoral Symphony” (1946), based on story by the future Nobel laureate Andre Gide. Ms. Morgan won the best actress award at the Cannes film festival for her portrayal of an orphaned blind girl in love with a married Swiss pastor who also draws the attention of his son.

“Miss Morgan’s performance is an exquisite piece of art — tender, proud, and piteous in its comprehensions of the feelings of the blind,” New York Times film critic Bosley Crowther wrote.

In “The Fallen Idol” (1948), a stylish suspense drama based on a Graham Greene story, Ms. Morgan added vulnerable depths to an otherwise supporting role as the mistress of an embassy butler (Ralph Richardson) who is accused of killing his cruel wife.

Throughout the 1950s, Ms. Morgan remained one of France’s most prominent leading ladies, often in romantic, adulterous and melodramatic parts. She also played many historic roles — as Joan of Arc in “Daughters of Destiny” (1954), Joséphine de Beauharnais in “Napoléon” opposite Daniel Gélin in the title role, and “Marie Antoinette in “Shadow of the Guillotine” (1956).

One of her subtlest performances was as the divorcée who resists but then gives in to a cavalry officer (Gérard Philipe) who romances her on a bet in “The Grand Maneuver” (1955), directed by Rene Clement.

She had a supporting role as a countess in the 1966 war film “Lost Command,” starring Anthony Quinn and Alain Delon, and had a late-stage starring role as a wealthy widow who is a suspect in the killing of her faithless husband in “Cat and Mouse” (1975), a thriller directed by Claude Lelouche.

Simone Renée Roussel was born in the Paris suburb of Neuilly-sur-Seine on Feb. 29, 1920, and grew up mostly in Dieppe. After dramatic study under actor René Simon, she entered films as an extra in the mid-1930s and was spotted by director Marc Allegret, who also guided the early careers of Simone Simon and Jean-Pierre Aumont.

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She became an overnight sensation as a young girl accused of a crime of passion in Allegret’s “Gribouille” (1937) opposite the star, Raimu. She was then raced into “Storm” (1938) as the young woman having a tryst with a businessman played by Charles Boyer. Her seductive charms were then used to first-rate effect in “Port of Shadows.”

Her first marriage, to American actor William Marshall, ended in divorce. Her second husband, French actor Henri Vidal, died in 1959. She then was the companion of director, actor and writer Gérard Oury until his death in 2006.

A son from her first marriage, Mike Marshall, died in 2005. Information about survivors was not immediately available.

Starting in the 1970s, Ms. Morgan became a frequent presence on French television and stage, and she took up painting. Her allure remained intact and incontrovertible, especially as she spoke about “Port of Shadows” and its enduring mystique.

“There was a scene in which I was in the bed, in the bedroom, and Gabin was not in the bed,” she told an interviewer decades after its making. “He was sitting on the bed. Oh, it was very, very modest, it was not something very daring when you compare that sort of thing with what they do now. In fact, that scene was more exciting than what they do now, I suppose, because mystery is a great part in a love scene.”


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on December 20, 2016, 02:20:58 PM
You're best off clicking the links and not just reading the text in the posts; because at the links are some great pics

Hollywood Reporter

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/michele-morgan-french-actress-fallen-idol-dies-at-96-958050

Michele Morgan, French Actress in 'The Fallen Idol,' Dies at 96

By Cheryl Cheng



Michele Morgan, famous for her role in The Fallen Idol, died at her home in Paris on Tuesday, according to her family. In a statement, her family said: "The most beautiful eyes in cinema were permanently closed this morning." She was 96.

Considered one of the greatest actresses of French cinema, Morgan is best known as the girlfriend of an unhappily married butler (Ralph Richardson) whose wife dies accidentally in the 1948 film The Fallen Idol. It was nominated for two Oscars.

Morgan was born Feb. 29, 1920, in Neuilly-sur-Seine as Simone Renee Roussel. She left home when she was 15 to pursue acting and took lessons from Rene Simon, the founder of the Cours Simon drama school in Paris.

Her breakthrough role was in Marc Allegret's 1937 film Heart of Paris, in which she starred opposite Raimu. Allegret also cast her in his 1938 film Storm, but she became a well-known actress when she starred in Marcel Carne's Port of Shadows (1938) with famous French actor Jean Gabin. In Shadows, Gabin tells Morgan, "You have beautiful eyes, you know." To which she replies, "Kiss me." As a result, she became known as the actress with "the most beautiful eyes in cinema." Her 1977 autobiography was entitled With These Eyes.

When Germany invaded France in 1940 during World War II, Morgan fled to the United States, where she was cast in several Hollywood films, including Robert Stevenson's Joan of Paris (1942), Higher and Higher (1943) with Frank Sinatra and Passage to Marseille (1944) with Humphrey Bogart. In 1941 she built a house in Los Angeles at 10050 Cielo Drive, which later became famous as the site of the Manson family murders in 1969.

Returning to France after the war, she continued to work for the next two decades. In 1946, she starred in Jean Delannoy's religious drama Pastoral Symphony, a film about a minister and his son who both fall in love with a blind woman, played by Morgan. For her role, she won the best actress award at the first-ever Cannes Film Festival in 1946.

Her career continued with such highlights as The Fallen Idol; Fabiola (1949); The Glass Castle (1950); The Proud and the Beautiful (1953); Shadow of the Guillotine (1956), in which she stars as Marie Antoinette; and Lost Command (1966).

Morgan has received many awards during her career, including a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960, France's Legion of Honor in 1969 and an honorary Cesar for her contributions to French cinema in 1992. She also won the Career Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1996. She was voted as the most popular French actress 10 times.

She spent her later years painting and had a solo exhibit in Paris in 2009. "I find calm, I have always liked to be alone, and I have never been happier than with my painting," she has said.

Of her her long, successful acting career, in which has starred in nearly 70 films, Morgan has said: "I have never had the opportunity to play sexy women. I must believe that my charm was not in my ass."


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on December 20, 2016, 03:25:49 PM
rip


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on December 27, 2016, 12:49:31 PM
RIP Carrie Fisher

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/27/movies/carrie-fisher-dead-star-wars-princess-leia.html?_r=0

Carrie Fisher, Child of Hollywood and ‘Star Wars’ Royalty, Dies at 60
By Dave Itzkoff


Ms. Fisher established Princess Leia as a damsel who could very much deal with her own distress, whether facing down the villainy of the dreaded Darth Vader or the romantic interests of the roguish smuggler Han Solo.

Wielding blaster pistols, piloting futuristic vehicles and, to her occasional chagrin, wearing strange hairdos and a revealing metal bikini, she reprised the role in three more films — “The Empire Strikes Back” in 1980, “Return of the Jedi” in 1983 and, 32 years later, “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” by which time Leia had become a hard-bitten general.

Lucasfilm said on Tuesday that Ms. Fisher had completed her work in an as-yet-untitled eighth episode of the main “Star Wars” saga, which is scheduled to be released in December 2017.

Winning the admiration of countless fans, Ms. Fisher never played Leia as helpless. She had the toughness to escape the clutches of the monstrous gangster Jabba the Hutt and the tenderness to tell Han Solo, as he is about to be frozen in carbonite, “I love you.” (Solo, played by Harrison Ford, caddishly replies, “I know.”)

Offscreen, Ms. Fisher was open about her diagnosis of bipolar disorder. She gave her dueling dispositions the nicknames Roy (“the wild ride of a mood,” she said) and Pam (“who stands on the shore and sobs”). She channeled her struggles with depression and substance abuse into fiercely comic works, including the semiautobiographical novel “Postcards From the Edge” and the one-woman show “Wishful Drinking,” which she turned into a memoir.

For all the attention she received for playing Princess Leia, Ms. Fisher enjoyed poking wicked fun at the character, as well as at the fantastical “Star Wars” universe. “Who wears that much lip gloss into battle?” she asked in a recent memoir, “The Princess Diarist.”

Having seen fame’s light and dark sides, Ms. Fisher did not take it too seriously, or consider it an enduring commodity.

As she wrote in “The Princess Diarist”:

“Perpetual celebrity — the kind where any mention of you will interest a significant percentage of the public until the day you die, even if that day comes decades after your last real contribution to the culture — is exceedingly rare, reserved for the likes of Muhammad Ali.”

Carrie Frances Fisher was born on Oct. 21, 1956, in Beverly Hills, Calif. She was the first child of her highly visible parents (they later had a son, Todd), and said in “Wishful Drinking” that, while her mother was under anesthetic delivering her, her father fainted.

“So when I arrived,” Ms. Fisher wrote, “I was virtually unattended! And I have been trying to make up for that fact ever since.”
Times Talks: Carrie Fisher

Ms. Fisher discussed her life and career, including the legendary Star Wars Holiday Special, with The Times's David Carr as part of the Times Talks series.
By THE NEW YORK TIMES on January 12, 2010. Photo by Chris Pizzello/Associated Press. Watch in Times Video »

In 1959, Ms. Reynolds divorced Eddie Fisher in the wake of his affair with Elizabeth Taylor, whom he married that same year. (Ms. Taylor later left him to marry Richard Burton.)

Any semblance of a normal childhood was impossible for Ms. Fisher. At 15, she played a debutante in the Broadway musical “Irene,” which starred her mother, and appeared in Ms. Reynolds’s Las Vegas nightclub act. At 17, Ms. Fisher made her first movie, “Shampoo” (1975), Hal Ashby’s satire of Nixon-era politics and the libidinous Los Angeles culture of the time, in which she played the precocious daughter of a wealthy woman (Lee Grant) having an affair with a promiscuous hairdresser (Warren Beatty).

She was one of roughly two dozen young actresses considered for the role of Princess Leia in Mr. Lucas’s marathon casting sessions for “Star Wars.” (Cindy Williams, Amy Irving, Sissy Spacek and Jodie Foster were among those who also read for the part.)

Many of Ms. Fisher’s line readings from that film have since become part of the cinematic canon: her repeated, almost hypnotic exhortation, “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi, you’re my only hope”; her wryly unimpressed reaction when Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) arrives in disguise to rescue her from a detention cell: “Aren’t you a little short for a storm trooper?”

“Star Wars” became a financial and cultural phenomenon, launching more movies and a merchandising machine that splashed Ms. Fisher’s likeness on all manner of action figures and products while casting her into an uneasy limelight.

She partied with the Rolling Stones during the making of “The Empire Strikes Back,” hosted “Saturday Night Live” and had romantic relationships with Dan Aykroyd (with whom she appeared in “The Blues Brothers”) and Paul Simon. She and Mr. Simon had a marriage that lasted less than a year, and he was inspired to write his song “Hearts and Bones” about their time together.

As its lyrics go:

    Two people were married
    The act was outrageous
    The bride was contagious
    She burned like a bride.

In “The Princess Diarist,” she admitted what many fans had long suspected: During the filming of the first “Star Wars” movie, she and Harrison Ford (who was married at the time) had an affair.

Ms. Fisher acknowledged taking drugs like LSD and Percodan throughout the 1970s and ’80s and later said that she was using cocaine while making “The Empire Strikes Back.”

In 1985, after filming a role in Woody Allen’s “Hannah and Her Sisters,” she had a nearly fatal drug overdose. She had her stomach pumped and checked herself into a 30-day rehab program in Los Angeles. Those experiences later became grist for her caustic, comic novel “Postcards From the Edge,” whose chapters are variously presented as letters, diary entries, monologues and third-person narratives.

As the main character, Suzanne, writes of her rehab stay: “Mom brought me some peanut butter cookies and a biography of Judy Garland. She told me she thought my problem was that I was too impatient, my fuse was too short, that I was only interested in instant gratification. I said, ‘Instant gratification takes too long.’”

The book was later made into a movie, directed by Mike Nichols from a script by Ms. Fisher. Released in 1990, it starred Meryl Streep as Suzanne and Shirley MacLaine as her movie-star mother.

On film, Ms. Fisher also played the scene-stealing best friend of Meg Ryan’s title character in the 1989 romantic comedy “When Harry Met Sally…” On television, she played satirical versions of herself on shows like “Sex and the City” and “The Big Bang Theory.” She had a recurring role on the British comedy “Catastrophe” (seen here on Amazon) as the mother of the character played by Rob Delaney, one of the show’s creators.

Her survivors include her mother; her brother, Todd; her daughter, Billie Lourd, from a relationship with the talent agent Bryan Lourd; and her half sisters, Joely Fisher and Tricia Leigh Fisher, the daughters of Eddie Fisher and Connie Stevens.

Ms. Fisher had a Dorothy Parker-like presence on Twitter, where she ruminated on the inexplicable mania surrounding “Star Wars” and on her French bulldog, Gary, in playful messages filled with emoji.

Last year, after the release of “The Force Awakens,” she wrote, in part: “Please stop debating about whether OR not [eye emoji] aged well. unfortunately it hurts all 3 of my feelings. My BODY hasn’t aged as well as I have.”


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on December 28, 2016, 06:53:58 PM
Quote
Her survivors include her mother
Er, not so fast.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: noodles_leone on December 29, 2016, 04:35:56 AM
Er, not so fast.

 ;D






 :'( :'(


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on December 29, 2016, 10:36:49 AM
Debbie was serviceable in Singin' In the Rain, and she did her bit for How the West Was Won. I saw The Unsinkable Molly Brown is a drive-in in 1964 or '65 and have never felt the need to return to it since. I've in fact never felt the need to seek out any of her other films. If she'd never had a career I would not have missed it. She was a pleasant enough presence on the chat show circuit, I guess. Johnny Carson was a good friend.

Her daughter's acting career was equally unimportant (I hear her writing is worthwhile, though). Anyone could have played Princess L, and anyone would have been made a celebrity by the role. The movie was a phenomenon, but not due to the acting.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on December 29, 2016, 11:32:20 AM
obituaries for Debbie Reynolds in The New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/movies/debbie-reynolds-dead.html?_r=0

Debbie Reynolds, Wholesome Ingénue in 1950s Films, Dies at 84
By Anita Gates

Debbie Reynolds, the wholesome ingénue in 1950s films like “Singin’ in the Rain” and “Tammy and the Bachelor,” died Wednesday, a day after the death of her daughter, the actress Carrie Fisher. She was 84.

Her death was confirmed by her son, Todd Fisher, according to her agent, Tom Markley of the Metropolitan Talent Agency. Ms. Reynolds was taken to a Los Angeles hospital on Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Fisher told the television station ABC 7 Los Angeles that she had suffered a stroke.

According to TMZ, she had been discussing funeral plans for Ms. Fisher, who died on Tuesday after having a heart attack during a flight to Los Angeles last Friday.

“She’s now with Carrie, and we’re all heartbroken,” Mr. Fisher said from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, where Ms. Reynolds was taken by ambulance, The Associated Press said. He said the stress of his sister’s death “was too much” for his mother.

On Tuesday, Ms. Reynolds had expressed gratitude to her daughter’s fans on Facebook.

“Thank you to everyone who has embraced the gifts and talents of my beloved and amazing daughter,” she wrote. “I am grateful for your thoughts and prayers that are now guiding her to her next stop.”

Ms. Reynolds’s career peak may have been her best-actress Academy Award nomination for playing the title role in “The Unsinkable Molly Brown” (1964), a rags-to-riches western musical based on a true story.

Her best-remembered film is probably “Singin’ in the Rain” (1952), the classic MGM musical about 1920s moviemaking, in which she held her own with Gene Kelly and Donald O’Connor, although she was only 19 when the movie was shot and had never danced professionally before. Her fans may cherish her sentimental good-girl portrayals, like the title role in “Tammy and the Bachelor” (1957), in which she played a Louisiana moonshiner’s wide-eyed granddaughter who spouted folksy wisdom.

Her greatest fame, however, may have come not from any movie role but from the Hollywood scandal involving her husband and a glamorous young widow.

In 1955, Ms. Reynolds married Eddie Fisher, the boyish music idol whose hits included “Oh! My Pa-Pa” and “I’m Walking Behind You,” and the young couple were embraced by fan magazines as America’s sweethearts. Their best friends were the producer Mike Todd and his new wife, the femme-fatale film star Elizabeth Taylor.

When Mr. Todd died in a private-plane crash in 1958, Ms. Reynolds and Mr. Fisher rushed to comfort Ms. Taylor. Mr. Fisher’s comforting, however, turned into a very public extramarital affair. He and Ms. Reynolds were divorced early the next year, and he and Ms. Taylor were married weeks later. That marriage lasted five years. Ms. Taylor left Mr. Fisher for Richard Burton, whom she had met in Rome on the set of “Cleopatra” (1963).

Almost 40 years later, in an interview with The Chicago Sun-Times, Ms. Reynolds said of Ms. Taylor, “Probably she did me a great favor.” In her 1988 autobiography, “Debbie: My Life,” she described a marriage that was unhappy from the beginning.

“He didn’t think I was funny,” Ms. Reynolds wrote of Mr. Fisher. “I wasn’t good in bed. I didn’t make good gefilte fish or good chopped liver. So what did he have? A cute little girl next door with a little turned-up nose. That was, in fact, all he actually ever said he wanted from me. The children, he said, better have your nose.”

Mary Frances Reynolds was born on April 1, 1932, in El Paso. Her father, Ray, worked for the railroad and struggled financially during the Depression. Her mother, Maxene, took in laundry to help make ends meet. As Nazarene Baptists, they considered movies sinful.

With the promise of a better job, Ray moved to California when Mary Frances was 7, and the family soon followed. Her career dream was to go to college and become a gym teacher, she often said, but when she was named Miss Burbank 1948, everything changed. Two of the judges were movie-studio scouts, and she was soon under contract to Warner Bros., which changed her name.

In 1950, she made her movie debut in “The Daughter of Rosie O’Grady,” a musical comedy starring June Haver and Gordon MacRae. The same year, she played Helen Kane, the 1920s singer known as the boop-boop-a-doop girl, in “Three Little Words” and also appeared in “Two Weeks With Love,” in which she sang “Aba Daba Honeymoon” with Carleton Carpenter. The song became a huge novelty hit.

Her roles seemed to mirror 1950s attitudes toward love, marriage and family. In 1955, she played a marriage-minded all-American girl opposite Frank Sinatra in “The Tender Trap.” In 1956, she starred with her new husband, Mr. Fisher, in “Bundle of Joy,” a musical remake of the 1939 comedy “Bachelor Mother.”

After the Taylor-Fisher-Reynolds scandal, Ms. Reynolds rode on a crest of good will and was a popular co-star in a long string of films, mostly lighthearted romantic comedies, including “The Gazebo” (1959), “Say One for Me” (1959) and “The Pleasure of His Company” (1961). She also played the title role in “The Singing Nun” (1966), appeared in “Divorce American Style” (1967) and was part of the all-star ensemble cast of “How the West Was Won” (1963), a rare drama among her more than three dozen movie credits.

“Drama’s unhappy, and playing someone unhappy would make me unhappy,” she told The Boston Globe in 1990. “Ain’t for me, honey.”

She took a stab at series television with a sitcom, “The Debbie Reynolds Show” (1969), in which she played a wacky Lucy Ricardo-like wife who wanted to be a journalist like her husband. It lasted only one season. But she soon achieved a kind of immortality as the voice of Charlotte the selfless spider in the animated film version of E. B. White’s children’s classic “Charlotte’s Web” (1973).

She had married Harry Karl, a wealthy shoe manufacturer, in 1960, but by the time they divorced in 1973, he had gambled away or otherwise misspent his fortune and hers. Ms. Reynolds set out to re-establish herself financially.

She headed to New York that year to make her Broadway debut in a revival of the 1920s musical “Irene,” for which she received a Tony Award nomination for best actress in a musical. In 1976, she had a short-lived one-woman Broadway show, “Debbie.” She made her last Broadway appearance in 1983, taking over the role originated by Lauren Bacall in the musical version of “Woman of the Year.” She later toured the country with stage shows including “Annie Get Your Gun” and a new version of “The Unsinkable Molly Brown.”

She had taken her musical and comedy talents to Las Vegas as early as 1960 and became a fixture there in the ’70s and ’80s. She and her third husband, Richard Hamlett, a Virginia real estate developer, established their own hotel, casino and movie-memorabilia museum there. But there were financial problems, and the property had to be sold in the ’90s.

A decade or so later, it looked as if Ms. Reynolds would finally find a permanent home for her Hollywood memorabilia museum, this time in Pigeon Forge, Tenn., the home of Dolly Parton’s theme park, Dollywood. But that, too, fell through, and in 2011, a large portion of her collection was auctioned at the Paley Center in Beverly Hills.

Two sales, the first in June and the second in December, took in a little more than $25 million, including $4.6 million for the dress Marilyn Monroe wore in the famous subway-grate scene in “The Seven Year Itch.”

For a while, Ms. Reynolds seemed to be better known as the mother of Ms. Fisher — who shot to stardom as Princess Leia in the “Star Wars” movies and wrote semiautobiographical novels — than as an actress or singer. Ms. Fisher’s 1987 book, “Postcards From the Edge,” made into a film starring Meryl Streep and Shirley MacLaine, reflected the sometimes difficult relationship between her and her famous mother.

Ms. Reynolds’s career took something of a back seat to her personal life when she married Mr. Hamlett in 1984, but they divorced 12 years later.

In 1996, Ms. Reynolds made an attention-getting big-screen comeback when Albert Brooks cast her as his often-clueless yet admirably self-possessed widowed mother in “Mother.” Her uncharacteristically low-key comic performance earned her a Golden Globe nomination, though not the Oscar nomination that many had predicted.

The next year, she played Kevin Kline’s mother in the sexual-identity film comedy “In & Out.” And beginning in 1999, she won new fans with a recurring role on the NBC sitcom “Will & Grace” as Bobbi Adler, the Debra Messing character’s gregarious, uninhibited mother, who had a tendency to burst into song (show tunes, of course).

Ms. Reynolds continued acting and doing voice work in both films and television into her late 70s. In 2013, she appeared as Liberace’s strong-willed mother in the HBO movie “Behind the Candelabra,” with Michael Douglas as Liberace. She appears in the documentary “Bright Lights: Starring Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds,” which was shown at the New York Film Festival in October, and of which her son, Mr. Fisher, is a producer.

She is survived by Mr. Fisher and a granddaughter, Billie Lourd.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on December 29, 2016, 11:35:37 AM
obituary for Debbie Reynolds in Variety

http://variety.com/2016/film/news/debbie-reynolds-dead-dies-carrie-fisher-mother-1201949432/

Debbie Reynolds, ‘Singin’ in the Rain’ Star and Carrie Fisher’s Mother, Dies at 84
By Carmel Dagan

Debbie Reynolds, the Oscar-nominated singer-actress who was the mother of late actress Carrie Fisher, has died at Cedars-Sinai hospital. She was 84.

“She wanted to be with Carrie,” her son Todd Fisher told Variety.

She was taken to the hospital from Carrie Fisher’s Beverly Hills house Wednesday after suffering a stroke, the day after her daughter Carrie Fisher died.

The vivacious blonde, who had a close but sometimes tempestuous relationship with her daughter, was one of MGM’s principal stars of the 1950s and ’60s in such films as the 1952 classic “Singin’ in the Rain” and 1964’s “The Unsinkable Molly Brown,” for which she received an Oscar nomination as best actress.

Reynolds received the SAG lifetime achievement award in January 2015; in August of that year the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences voted to present the actress with the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award at the Nov. 14 Governors Awards, but she was unable to attend the ceremony due to an “unexpectedly long recovery from a recent surgery.”

Reynolds had a wholesome girl-next-door look which was coupled with a no-nonsense attitude in her roles. They ranged from sweet vehicles like “Tammy” to more serious fare such as “The Rat Race” and “How the West Was Won.” But amid all the success, her private life was at the center of one of the decade’s biggest scandals when then-husband, singer Eddie Fisher, left her for Elizabeth Taylor in 1958.

Reynolds handled it well personally, but got more tabloid coverage when she divorced her second husband, shoe manufacturer Harry Karl, claiming that he had wiped away all of her money with his gambling. The 1987 novel “Postcards From the Edge,” written by Carrie Fisher, and the film adaptation three years later, were regarded as an embellishment on Reynolds’ up-and-down relationship with her actress daughter. In 1997, Reynolds declared personal bankruptcy after the Debbie Reynolds Hotel & Casino closed after years of financial troubles.

She continued to work well into her 80s, via film and TV work, guesting on “The Golden Girls” and “Roseanne” and drawing an Emmy nomination in 2000 for her recurring role on “Will and Grace” as the latter’s entertainer mother. She also did a number of TV movies, including an almost-unrecognizable turn as Liberace’s mother in Steven Soderbergh’s “Behind the Candelabra” for HBO in 2013. Younger audiences treasured her in the role of Aggie Cromwell in Disney Channel’s “Halloweentown” and its three sequels. She also frequently did voice work for “Kim Possible” and “Family Guy.”

For movie fans, she was always the pert star of movies, TV, nightclubs and Broadway. But to industry people, she was known for her philanthropy, including more than 60 years of working with the organization the Thalians on mental-health care. She was also known for her energetic battles to preserve Hollywood heritage. She bought thousands of pieces when MGM auctioned off its costumes and props, including Marilyn Monroe’s “subway dress” from “The Seven Year Itch,” a Charlie Chaplin bowler hat and a copy of the ruby slippers from “The Wizard of Oz.” Reynolds spent decades trying to get these items showcased in a museum.

Marie Frances Reynolds was born in El Paso, Texas; when she was 8, her carpenter father moved the family to Burbank. At age 16, “Frannie” entered the Miss Burbank Contest, winning in 1948 for her imitation of Betty Hutton singing “My Rockin’ Horse Ran Away.” She was spotted by Warner Bros. talent scout Solly Baiano, who signed her to a $65-a-week contract. Studio head Jack Warner renamed her Debbie — against her wishes, she said.

Reynolds languished at the studio, often having to perform errands such as escorting visitors on tours or addressing envelopes; she appeared in front of the cameras only for a bit part in “June Bride” and then a flashier role as June Haver’s sister in “The Daughter of Rosie O’Grady.”

When the contract lapsed, MGM picked her up at $300 a week. The studio, where she would reside for the next 20 years, first assigned her a role lip-synching Helen Kane’s voice as the original Betty Boop in the musical “Three Little Words.” In romantic musical “Two Weeks With Love,” she used her own voice to put across “Aba Daba Honeymoon,” and she was also given a supporting role in “Mr. Imperium,” starring Lana Turner.

After the studio insisted on her as the romantic lead in “Singin’ in the Rain,” Gene Kelly put her through rigorous dance training, which she admitted she needed. “They took this virgin talent, this little thing, and expected her to hold her own with Gene and with Donald O’Connor, two of the best dancers in the business,” she once told an interviewer. Many years later, “Singin’ in the Rain” was No. 1 on AFI’s 100 Years of Musicals list, and ranked No. 5 in its 2007 list of the greatest American films.

She was 20 when the film opened and her career kicked into high gear. She was next given the female lead in “The Affairs of Dobie Gillis,” co-starring Bobby Van, and segued into another musical comedy, “Give a Girl a Break,” with Marge and Gower Champion.

On loan to RKO, she impressed in the comedy “Susan Slept Here,” with Dick Powell as a screenwriter who must deal with a juvenile delinquent, played by Reynolds, on Christmas Eve. After the film became a hit, Reynolds’ contract was renegotiated. While she was assigned to lackluster musicals such as “Athena” and “Hit the Deck,” the comedies were better, such as “The Tender Trap,” with Frank Sinatra.

And she made a big impression in her dramatic turn as Bette Davis’s daughter in Gore Vidal’s adaptation of Paddy Chayevsky’s “The Catered Affair” (1956).

In 1956, she also starred in RKO’s “Bundle of Joy” (a musical remake of “Bachelor Mother”) opposite crooner Eddie Fisher, whom she had recently married.

“Tammy and the Bachelor,” which featured her million-selling single of the ballad “Tammy,” defined Reynolds and may have limited her to roles as the wholesome all-American type. She went on to play essentially the same part in such films as “The Mating Game” and “The Pleasure of His Company,” with only the occasional tart turn in movies such as “The Rat Race.”

Reynolds had one of the principal roles in 1962’s all-star Cinerama epic “How the West Was Won.” And in the 1960s she remained a star, despite the ho-hum box office performances of  “Mary, Mary,” “Goodbye Charlie” and “The Singing Nun.”

When Shirley MacLaine dropped out of 1964’s “The Unsinkable Molly Brown,” Reynolds got her best chance to shine centerstage in a musical comedy about the real-life woman who went from rags to riches and survived the Titanic sinking. (One of the show’s signature songs, “I Ain’t Down Yet,” became an unofficial anthem for the actress as she survived all the turmoil in her life.)

She had two of her best roles in “Divorce, American Style,” directed by Bud Yorkin and co-written by Norman Lear; and the 1971 black-comedy suspenser “What’s the Matter With Helen?” with Shelley Winters. But her movie roles were slowing down and the actress tried series television; “The Debbie Reynolds Show” lasted only one season on NBC from 1969-70.


continued next post


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on December 29, 2016, 11:36:04 AM
continued from previous post


In 1973, the actress divorced Karl and discovered she was almost $3 million in debt as a result of his gambling losses. She worked it off by appearing 42 weeks a year in nightclubs and Las Vegas and Reno.

She also established the Debbie Reynolds Professional Studios in Burbank. She went to Broadway in a revival of “Irene,” drawing a 1973 Tony nomination for best actress in a musical, which gave daughter Carrie Fisher one of her first roles. After doing “Annie Get Your Gun” on tour, Reynolds returned to Broadway in a short-lived turn in “Woman of the Year.” She toured with Meredith Willson’s stage musical “The Unsinkable Molly Brown” in 1989, 25 years after the film debuted.

Reynolds appeared in a number of successful exercise tapes for older women, “Do It Debbie’s Way,” and co-authored the autobiography “Debbie, My Life” in 1987.

That same year, Reynolds’ private life was again in the spotlight when Carrie Fisher’s novel “Postcards From the Edge” debuted. The work centered on the stormy relationship between an actress and her showbiz-star mother. Though many were convinced this was a roman a clef, Reynolds laughingly pooh-poohed comparisons with the self-centered mom. (MacLaine, the original choice for MGM’s “Molly Brown,” played the mother in the 1990 film adaptation.)

In 1993, the Debbie Reynolds Hotel & Casino opened in Vegas, where she appeared for most weekends in the showroom with Rip Taylor. The next year she opened her Hollywood Movie Museum in Vegas. Reynolds said she got the idea for the hotel as an afterthought, as she was looking for a permanent home for her collection of movie memorabilia.

Reynolds appeared in a number of films in the 1990s, including the title character in the Albert Brooks comedy “Mother.” She also cameo’d as herself in “The Bodyguard”; appeared in Oliver Stone’s “Heaven and Earth”; and played a mother determined to marry off her son whether he’s gay or not in the 1997 “In and Out.” She also appeared in a broadly comic role as the grandmother in Katherine Heigl vehicle “One for the Money” in 2012.

Reynolds also did voice work for many animated film and TV works, starting with the title character in 1973’s “Charlotte’s Web.” and providing voices for the English version of anime “Kiki’s Delivery Service” and for “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Movie,” “Rugrats in Paris” and “Light of Olympia.”

In 2005 she won the President’s Award at the Costume Designers Guild Awards “for her collection and conservation of classic Hollywood costumes.” However, a deal for placement of the collection fell through, and Reynolds was forced to auction off most of the collection, which was valued at almost $11 million.

In 1955 Reynolds was among the young actors who founded the Thalians, a charitable organization aimed at raising awareness and providing treatment and support for those suffering from mental health issues; Reynolds was elected president of the organization in 1957 and served in that role for more than five decades, and she and actress Ruta Lee alternated as chair of the board. Through Reynolds’ efforts, the Thalians donated millions of dollars to the Mental Health Center at Cedars-Sinai (closed in 2012) and to UCLA’s Operation Mend, which provides medical and psychological services to wounded veterans and their families.

Reynolds was married to third husband Richard Hamlett, a real estate developer, from 1984-96.

Daughter Carrie Fisher died Dec. 27, 2016; Reynolds is survived by her son Todd, a TV commercial director from her marriage to Eddie Fisher; and granddaughter, actress Billie Lourd.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Cusser on December 30, 2016, 08:25:16 AM
Debbie Reynolds was a great talent, impeccable in Singin' in the Rain, and she held How the west was Won together.

And no one can ever top her encore !!!


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Big Boss 1971 on January 11, 2017, 10:55:29 PM
After Zsa Zsa (Minerva in final Batman episode) comes Francine York (Lydia Limpet , Bookworms moll) , gone to the great Bat Cave in the sky.

Also Bill Christopher aka father Mulcahy , MASH.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on January 14, 2017, 05:08:17 PM
Hymie's Circuits Have Finally Fused: Dick Gautier, Gone at 85. I will always remember his work in Get Smart.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on January 15, 2017, 01:49:29 PM
Hymie's Circuits Have Finally Fused: Dick Gautier, Gone at 85. I will always remember his work in Get Smart.

Hiollywood Reporter: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/dick-gautier-dead-get-smart-actor-was-85-964369

LA Times http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/la-et-st-dick-gautier-get-smart-hymie-death-20170114-story.html


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on January 19, 2017, 03:20:51 PM
Miguel Ferrer, dead from cancer at 61. He was great as Bob Morton in RoboCop.
http://variety.com/2017/film/news/miguel-ferrer-dead-dies-ncis-los-angeles-1201964233/


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on January 20, 2017, 04:00:33 AM
Miguel Ferrer, dead from cancer at 61. He was great as Bob Morton in RoboCop.
http://variety.com/2017/film/news/miguel-ferrer-dead-dies-ncis-los-angeles-1201964233/

RIP


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on January 22, 2017, 06:38:49 PM
http://pitchfork.com/news/71067-can-drummer-jaki-liebezeit-dead-at-78/?mbid=social_facebook

Pneumonia. A real shame.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on January 22, 2017, 06:48:39 PM
Miguel Ferrer, dead from cancer at 61. He was great as Bob Morton in RoboCop.
http://variety.com/2017/film/news/miguel-ferrer-dead-dies-ncis-los-angeles-1201964233/

Looked just like his dad.

RIP


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on January 25, 2017, 01:08:57 PM
Mary Tyler Moore dies at 80

RIP

https://www.yahoo.com/tv/mary-tyler-moore-pioneer-on-and-off-the-screen-has-died-194733054.html


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on January 25, 2017, 04:37:25 PM
RIP


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on January 26, 2017, 11:30:36 AM
Mary Tyler Moore dies at 80
https://www.yahoo.com/tv/mary-tyler-moore-pioneer-on-and-off-the-screen-has-died-194733054.html
Her greatest achievement was wearing black leotards on TV is the 60s.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on January 28, 2017, 09:49:22 AM
The Final Hurt: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-38778145?

Sir John was the greatest Caligula ever. Also the greatest Winston Smith. But even his presence could not save Heaven's Gate. Seventy-seven is too young for this great actor to leave us. A pity.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on January 28, 2017, 11:20:00 AM
https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2017/jan/28/peter-bradshaw-on-amour-star-emmanuelle-riva-cinematic-icon-in-two-different-eras

Drive Amour from your memory, Drink, and focus on the early triumphs: Hiroshima Mon Amour, Leon Morin, etc.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on January 28, 2017, 11:28:31 AM
http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/barbara-hale-dead-perry-mason-secretary-della-street-1201971817/

No TV show has meant more to me than the noir-informed Perry Mason; now on DVD, I watch episodes from 8 of the 9 seasons (the last season is a total loss) over and over. Hale is not the best female actress or the prettiest, just the one I've watched more than any other. I shall continue to do so.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on January 28, 2017, 04:25:35 PM
So much sad news  :'( RIP

John Hurt had one of the greatest voices ever.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on January 29, 2017, 03:52:10 AM
He was great as the scheming lunatic Caligula in I, Claudius


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on January 31, 2017, 11:27:55 AM
http://www.nbcmiami.com/entertainment/entertainment-news/Musician-John-Wetton-Asia-Dies-412261063.html

Saw Wetton live in 2011: he was the picture of beefy good health. A weak ago a friend showed me a recent picture: his 2-year fight with cancer left him so emaciated, today's news doesn't come as much of a shock. He was still a young man, though. A shame.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on January 31, 2017, 02:21:09 PM
Re: John Hurt

I remember seeing him - actually HEARING him - in 10 Rillington Place, with Richard Attenborough as the necrophile. As good as Attenborough was, I liked Hurt even more. What a great voice! And good actor, too.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Dust Devil on January 31, 2017, 02:28:09 PM
Re: John Hurt

I remember seeing him - actually HEARING him - in 10 Rillington Place, with Richard Attenborough as the necrophile. As good as Attenborough was, I liked Hurt even more. What a great voice! And good actor, too.

Sad news...  :'(

R.I.P.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on January 31, 2017, 02:57:54 PM
Re: John Hurt, he was great as Caligula in I, Claudius


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on February 19, 2017, 07:09:50 PM
http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-richard-schickel-dies-20170219-story.html


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Dust Devil on February 21, 2017, 01:48:43 AM
R.I.P.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on February 21, 2017, 04:19:43 AM
R.I.P.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on February 21, 2017, 05:59:32 AM
Sad to hear about Schickel. I will try to write a little more about him sometime I have a chance. RIP


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on February 22, 2017, 06:47:09 AM
Seijun Suzuki at 93: https://www.facebook.com/nikkatsu.co/posts/1665343290147993:0

Still love Youth of the Beast.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on February 22, 2017, 07:12:51 AM
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/japanese-auteur-seijun-suzuki-dies-at-93-978387


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on February 26, 2017, 11:12:10 AM
Bill Paxton Dies at 61  :'(

My memory of him is from the spectacular neo-noir A Simple Plan (1998)


NY Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/26/arts/bill-paxton-dead.html?_r=0

NBC: http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/actor-bill-paxton-dead-61-due-complications-surgery-n725776

Hollywood Reporter: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/bill-paxton-aliens-titanic-actor-dies-at-61-980169

Variety: http://variety.com/2017/film/news/bill-paxton-dead-dies-1201996712/


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Dust Devil on February 26, 2017, 11:15:50 AM
Bill Paxton Dies at 61  :'(

My memory of him is from the spectacular neo-noir A Simple Plan (1998)


NY Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/26/arts/bill-paxton-dead.html?_r=0

NBC: http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/actor-bill-paxton-dead-61-due-complications-surgery-n725776

Hollywood Reporter: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/bill-paxton-aliens-titanic-actor-dies-at-61-980169

Variety: http://variety.com/2017/film/news/bill-paxton-dead-dies-1201996712/

I was just writing about him... Really sad news: although I haven't seen anything of his recently, he was one of the faces I always remembered most fondly from my (movie) childhood. :'(

May he rest in peace. :'(


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Dust Devil on February 26, 2017, 11:18:48 AM
This time for real: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsx2vdn7gpY


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on February 26, 2017, 12:54:50 PM
This is a shock, because 61 is young.

Love, loved, loved him in True Lies. And he was an essential element of Nightcrawler. He was capable, it seemed, of years more of good work. A shame.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on February 26, 2017, 02:23:44 PM
This is a shock, because 61 is young.

Love, loved, loved him in True Lies. And he was an essential element of Nightcrawler. He was capable, it seemed, of years more of good work. A shame.

yeah, I saw him in Nightcawler as well. He was real good.

And we all saw him in Titanic, though none of us will admit to watching Titanic  ;)

He was a very good actor.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on February 26, 2017, 02:44:01 PM
And we all saw him in Titanic, though none of us will admit to watching Titanic  ;)
Never seen it. Hey, I thought you didn't watch comedies!


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on February 26, 2017, 05:43:25 PM
Never seen it. Hey, I thought you didn't watch comedies!

Sharon and I once decided to try watching it all the way through. We never made it. And not because it was a bad movie; just cuz we kept getting ... distracted


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Big Boss 1971 on March 24, 2017, 10:00:22 PM
Fred Weintraub (Enter Dragon producer)

Antonio Casale (GBUs Bill Carson)

Weintraub : "I guess Raymond doesn't want you to do a Hwood movie ?"

Bruce Lee , tad angry : "Sign the contract , Raymond"

 :P


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on March 28, 2017, 11:07:50 AM
Darlene Cates, the mother in What's Eating Gilbert Grape, dies at 69

AP: https://goo.gl/oEkJEv

MSN: https://goo.gl/dk5Oih


People: https://goo.gl/Dxo9PH

Variety: https://goo.gl/AYCWyv



Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 06, 2017, 01:10:54 PM
very sad news: the great, legendary comedian Don Rickles has passed away at the age of 90  :'(

Rest In Peace

Hollywood Reporter http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/don-rickles-dead-legendary-comic-was-90-720153

Variety http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/don-rickles-dead-dies-comedian-insult-vegas-1202025068/

---

Here is a 2004 profile of Rickles in The New Yorker http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2004/08/02/dont-call-me-sir

Just a few of the numerous Rickles videos on YouTube:


Rickles on Johnny Carson 1973 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i0Xx8m7c3xA

Rickles on Johnny Carson 1978 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUI72AWj-pc

Rickles on Jay Leno 1994 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6PIxqW_l4PI

Rickles on Jay Leno 2010 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fTPXAL5__dM


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on April 06, 2017, 01:52:42 PM
R.I.P. Don :'(


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on April 06, 2017, 02:37:19 PM
Because of his importance to cinema, he needs his own thread.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: stanton on April 06, 2017, 03:05:14 PM
Never heard of him.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 06, 2017, 10:58:23 PM
A couple more videos of Rickles:

At Ronald Reagan's second inaugural:  https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=K3kJ7VPJnmI

At Milton Berle's funeral  https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=u_87ZoEaUs4

I particularly think that the funeral one is appropriate, as, now that Rickles has passed, in this video shows us how - when someone dies who has lived a long and rich life, it's ok to laugh and celebrate his life even as you mourn his passing



----

Here is a great story that Rickles used to say about KELLY'S HEROES. The movie was filmed in Czechoslovakia: Rickles wanted to ensure that he would have good hotel accommodations, so he had written into his contract that he had to have the same accommodations that Clint Eastwood - the star of the movie - had.

So, he shows up on the first day and  is shown to his room – a shithole with a sheet down the middle: Eastwood had one half and Rickles had the other!


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on April 12, 2017, 12:00:33 PM
Michael Ballhaus ist tot. http://www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/kino/kameramann-michael-ballhaus-ist-tot-14969955.html


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: noodles_leone on April 12, 2017, 11:33:31 PM
Michael Ballhaus ist tot. http://www.faz.net/aktuell/feuilleton/kino/kameramann-michael-ballhaus-ist-tot-14969955.html

:(

Some of his films now look quite dated, and sometimes, he completely screwed up (last temptation....)... but his work on the Goodfellas and the Departed make him one of the great.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: stanton on April 13, 2017, 02:25:02 AM
Which ones look dated?


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on April 13, 2017, 09:02:55 AM
http://www.indiewire.com/2017/04/martin-scorsese-remembers-cinematographer-michael-ballhaus-goodfellas-gangs-of-new-york-1201805071/
Quote
“For him, nothing was impossible,” the director continued. “If I asked him for something difficult, he would approach it with enthusiasm: he never told me we couldn’t do something, and he loved to be challenged. If we were running out of time and light, he would figure out a way to work faster. And if we were behind schedule and getting into a situation where we had to eliminate set-ups, he would sit down with me calmly and we would work it out together: instead of getting frustrated about what was being taken away, he would always think in terms of what we had. Really, he gave me an education, and he changed my way of thinking about what it is to make a film. He was a great artist. He was also a precious and irreplaceable friend, and this is a great loss for me.

"Some people online are saying now that his work looks dated. That's envy talking. It comes from industry low-lifes who haven't a tenth of the talent Michael had. You get this kind of thing every time a great man passes. A lion dies and the jackals immediately start barking. I don't pay any attention, except that I write down the guy's name and put him on my shit list. I refuse to work with such people."


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 23, 2017, 02:00:01 AM
Erin Moran, Who Played Joanie on ‘Happy Days,’ Dies at 56

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/22/arts/television/erin-moran-dead-happy-days.html?_r=0


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: kjrwe on April 23, 2017, 02:39:17 AM
Erin Moran, Who Played Joanie on ‘Happy Days,’ Dies at 56

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/22/arts/television/erin-moran-dead-happy-days.html?_r=0

That's really too bad. She died WAY too young. May she rest in peace.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on April 25, 2017, 11:54:48 AM
http://www.repubblica.it/spettacoli/cinema/2017/04/22/news/e_morto_enrico_medioli_sceneggiatore_di_visconti_leone_e_zurlini-163610852/


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on April 25, 2017, 11:56:14 AM
R.I.P.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 26, 2017, 10:54:46 AM
Jonathan Demme dies at 73  :'( RIP

NY Times https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/26/movies/jonathan-demme-dead-movie-director-oscar-winner.html?_r=0

Chicago Tribune http://www.chicagotribune.com/entertainment/movies/ct-jonathan-demme-dead-20170426-story.html


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: greenbudgie on May 02, 2017, 06:53:40 AM
As there are lot of western fans on the Sergio Leone site I would like to report the passing of Lorna Gray at the age of 99 on April 30 just gone. She was female lead in some 1940 B-westerns by Republic etc.

She was in films with Monte Hale, Roy Rogers and Wild Bill Elliott as their female lead. She was mainly known for her comedy so she was used for the more light-hearted westerns. She was in Red River Range with John Wayne in the 1930s.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on May 04, 2017, 02:12:19 PM
https://deadline.com/2017/05/daliah-lavi-dies-casino-royale-actress-74-1202084123/
In her prime, a very desirable piece of ass. She adds a lot of interest to The Silencers. Her best role was probably in her best picture: Two Weeks in Another Town.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: greenbudgie on May 05, 2017, 03:10:50 AM
https://deadline.com/2017/05/daliah-lavi-dies-casino-royale-actress-74-1202084123/
In her prime, a very desirable piece of ass. She adds a lot of interest to The Silencers. Her best role was probably in her best picture: Two Weeks in Another Town.

Daliah Lavi was very attractive. I haven't seen many of her films. But my instant recall of her is being whipped by Christopher Lee in 'The Whip and the Body.'


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Jessica Rabbit on May 05, 2017, 08:21:06 AM
I remember Lavi more as a singer, but greenbudgie, that scene is what stands out in my mind from her acting career.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: greenbudgie on May 06, 2017, 02:57:25 AM
I never knew that she was a singer until I saw a DVD extra for 'The Whip and the Body' Jessica. Another film I have of hers is the 1965 version of 'Ten Little Indians' which is an adaptation of an Agatha Christie story.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: noodles_leone on May 10, 2017, 11:01:44 AM
http://www.slashfilm.com/michael-parks-dead/

 :'( :'( :'(


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on May 10, 2017, 12:14:04 PM
http://www.slashfilm.com/michael-parks-dead/

 :'( :'( :'(
Oh no! And just when I'd finally figured out who he was, too.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: noodles_leone on May 11, 2017, 03:45:31 AM
I'm not sure why, but it took me a few years to notice that Michael Parks and Robert Forster weren't the same person.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on May 15, 2017, 05:43:11 AM
Powers Boothe dead at 68. http://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/news/powers-boothe-agents-of-shield-and-sin-city-actor-dies-at-68/ar-BBB8w9l?OCID=ansmsnnews11


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on May 15, 2017, 05:56:33 AM
Powers Boothe dead at 68. http://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/news/powers-boothe-agents-of-shield-and-sin-city-actor-dies-at-68/ar-BBB8w9l?OCID=ansmsnnews11

Sad R.I.P.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on May 18, 2017, 08:13:53 AM
I spent the 90s outside the country so I missed grunge and I have no idea of the true significance of Chris Cornell's passing (at 52), but "You Know My Name" from Casino Royale wasn't bad, one of the few Bond title songs of recent years that has stayed with me.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: PowerRR on May 18, 2017, 02:47:18 PM
For young Roy, one of the only 'famous person' passings I've ever cared about, along with Phil Hoffman


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on May 23, 2017, 12:35:54 PM
Dina Merrill Dead at 93

NY Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/22/movies/dina-merrill-dead-actress-and-heiress.html?_r=0

AP: https://goo.gl/TgIvpC

LA Times: http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-dina-merrill-20170523-story.html


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on June 10, 2017, 11:21:28 AM
My favorite show in 1966 was Batman. https://variety.com/2017/tv/news/adam-west-dead-dies-batman-1202461532/


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: titoli on June 10, 2017, 12:34:43 PM
My favorite show in 1966 was Batman. https://variety.com/2017/tv/news/adam-west-dead-dies-batman-1202461532/

Wish I could have said the same. Unfortunately the show wasn't aired over here until the '80's. So I had to content myself at the time  with  a snippet of a few seconds caught on TV in B&W  in a cultural program (!!!)  and, in 1967, with the  movie. RIP.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on June 10, 2017, 01:24:02 PM
RIP


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on June 10, 2017, 05:23:13 PM
Unfortunately the show wasn't aired over here until the '80's. So I had to content myself at the time  with  a snippet of a few seconds caught on TV in B&W  in a cultural program (!!!)  and, in 1967, with the  movie. RIP.
We all have disadvantages to manage. My family didn't get a color TV until the 70s, so I saw all the originally aired shows in B&W. I loved them anyway.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: titoli on June 10, 2017, 10:36:38 PM
Of course, it was not the same. The colours were half the show. On the other hand,  I could appreciate Lorenzo Samples Jr. jokes and double-entendre's as an adult, but to have watched the show as a preteen it would have been a unique experience.  Still, I keep wondering why the show wasn't aired over here. It is true we had only two channels in 1966 and so a choice of import series had to be made, I guess the colour could have been a decisive item, as we had no colour tv programs until 1976.   


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on July 16, 2017, 03:28:26 PM
George A. Romero: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-me-george-romero-20170716-story,amp.html
If there's any justice, he'll be back as a zombie.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on July 16, 2017, 08:22:44 PM
George A. Romero: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-me-george-romero-20170716-story,amp.html
If there's any justice, he'll be back as a zombie.

RIP


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on July 16, 2017, 09:19:13 PM
Martin Landau: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/martin-landau-dead-ed-wood-811318?utm_source=twitter
Ed Wood, of course, but mostly I'll remember him from TV: Mission: Impossible and Space 1999.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on July 16, 2017, 11:30:35 PM
Martin Landau: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/martin-landau-dead-ed-wood-811318?utm_source=twitter
Ed Wood, of course, but mostly I'll remember him from TV: Mission: Impossible and Space 1999.

A very memorable face.

RIP

here is an obituary from the LA Times http://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/la-me-martin-landau-20170716-story.html


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on August 08, 2017, 03:37:06 PM
Glen Campbell died at 81. Legendary musician entertainer. Also had a movie appearance in True Grit

Washington Post https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/glen-campbell-superstar-entertainer-of-1960s-and-70s-dies/2017/08/08/c707482c-7c7a-11e7-b2b1-aeba62854dfa_story.html

NY Times https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/08/arts/music/glen-campbell-dead.html


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on August 08, 2017, 09:59:23 PM
Glen Campbell died at 81. Legendary musician entertainer. Also had a movie appearance in True Grit
I just learned today that Campbell was a native of Arkansas, which is interesting because, although he plays a Texan in the film, True Grit is set in Arkansas (and Oklahoma).


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on August 09, 2017, 01:20:27 PM
Haruo Nakajima, original Godzilla, dies at 88

Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/haruo-nakajima-monster-suited-actor-who-originated-godzilla-dies-at-88/2017/08/08/b7979712-7c51-11e7-83c7-5bd5460f0d7e_story.html


NY Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/08/world/asia/godzilla-actor-haruo-nakajima-japan.html


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on August 20, 2017, 01:21:44 PM
RIP Jerry Lewis

NY Times https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/20/movies/jerry-lewis-dead-celebrated-comedian-and-filmmaker.html

Variety http://variety.com/2017/film/news/jerry-lewis-dies-dead-nutty-professor-1202533899/

Washington Post https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/jerry-lewis-comedy-king-and-master-of-slapstick-dies-at-91/2017/08/20/8230cd72-85d0-11e7-a50f-e0d4e6ec070a_story.html


Title: Sonny Landham
Post by: Spikeopath on August 21, 2017, 07:28:03 AM
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0484739/reference


Title: Re: Sonny Landham
Post by: XhcnoirX on August 21, 2017, 07:58:39 AM
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0484739/reference

I can't say I've seen much of his work but loved him in Predator, as a teenager watching that movie his character was far more impressive and intimidating than the rest of the team. RIP.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on August 21, 2017, 10:05:12 AM
R.I.P.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on August 27, 2017, 04:02:20 PM
Tobe Hooper.

Lifeforce, Lifeforce, Lifeforce! (His three greatest pictures).


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on September 06, 2017, 09:16:38 AM
https://www.theguardian.com/music/2017/sep/06/holger-czukay-bassist-with-can-dies-aged-79


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on September 15, 2017, 05:57:51 PM
Harry Dean Stanton R.I.P. http://variety.com/2017/film/news/harry-dean-stanton-dead-dies-big-love-twin-peaks-1202560703/ (http://variety.com/2017/film/news/harry-dean-stanton-dead-dies-big-love-twin-peaks-1202560703/)


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: XhcnoirX on September 16, 2017, 04:07:55 AM
Harry Dean Stanton R.I.P. http://variety.com/2017/film/news/harry-dean-stanton-dead-dies-big-love-twin-peaks-1202560703/ (http://variety.com/2017/film/news/harry-dean-stanton-dead-dies-big-love-twin-peaks-1202560703/)

F*ck... RIP.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: noodles_leone on September 16, 2017, 04:24:02 AM
 :'(

(https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DJzQsMMW0AEB5Vi.jpg:large)


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on September 16, 2017, 06:16:54 AM
Who will ever forget his contribution to The Avengers? But even more significantly . . . made it to 91. Way to go, Harry!


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on September 16, 2017, 06:11:54 PM
Who will ever forget his contribution to The Avengers? But even more significantly . . . made it to 91. Way to go, Harry!

Most importantly, he made it to FOD!  ;)


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Dust Devil on September 17, 2017, 10:19:46 AM
R.I.P. HDS!


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on September 17, 2017, 03:56:16 PM
Most importantly, he made it to FOD!  ;)
LOL! I forgot about that.  O0 O0 O0


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on September 20, 2017, 10:03:45 AM
Jake laMotta Born: July 10, 1921, The Bronx, New York City, NY, Died: September 19, 2017 R.I.P.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on October 03, 2017, 11:50:28 AM
Chuck Low, who most famously played Morrie the wig salesman in Goodfellas, has passed away at 89. R.I.P.

There's also a Leone connection: Low had an uncredited role in OUATIA as the father of Debra and Fat Moe. I believe he has just one scene, on the morning of the Pesach holiday, where he hands Debra the key to watch the store as he walks with Moe to the synagogue.

Low had a significant supporting role in The Mission.

According to IMDB, he appeared in 8 films and 4 TV series (in one of those series, Tribeca, he appeared in multiple episodes). http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0522797/



NY Daily News: http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/movies/chuck-played-morrie-goodfellas-dead-89-article-1.3538097

Associated Press: https://apnews.com/242d066d0e5d418a9cd38ccde6be25b3/'Goodfellas'-actor-Charles-Low,-Robert-De-Niro's-buddy,-dies



Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on October 03, 2017, 02:08:29 PM
Wow, when he gets whacked in Goodfellas there's not a dry pant leg in the house! A real talent. And to think that originally he was De Niro's landlord! :o


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on October 05, 2017, 09:56:20 AM
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/05/anne-wiazemsky-french-actor-novelist-and-muse-to-jean-luc-godard-dies-aged-70


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: stanton on October 05, 2017, 12:45:32 PM
I read Wiazemsky's book about the shooting of Au hasard Balthasar a year ago.

She had a quite interesting face, and I wished she had played in some more films.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on October 06, 2017, 06:19:05 AM
I read Wiazemsky's book about the shooting of Au hasard Balthasar a year ago.
Thanks for the tip. I wonder if there's an English translation.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: stanton on October 06, 2017, 06:35:25 AM
Thanks for the tip. I wonder if there's an English translation.

It's very much about Bresson (as a human being). About a complex relation, not about filmmaking (which it also is to a certain extent).

Her book about Godard was not translated here, actually it seems only one more of her novels exists in German language. She met Godard at the set for the first time, when he visited, and behaved strangely. More an irritation than love on first sight.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on October 06, 2017, 06:54:46 AM
It's very much about Bresson (as a human being).
As I surmised. Hence my interest.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: stanton on October 06, 2017, 08:30:05 AM
Of course ...


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Big Boss 1971 on October 08, 2017, 03:20:22 AM
HDS was a buddy of Walken.......

Frank Vincent (Goodfellas , Casino , Sopranos)


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on October 10, 2017, 07:03:29 AM
R.I.P Jean Rochefort (1930-2017) I remember him from The Tall Blond Man with One Black Shoe and Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? and others.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on October 10, 2017, 08:44:37 AM
HDS was a buddy of Walken.......

Frank Vincent (Goodfellas , Casino , Sopranos)

Get out your fuckin’ shinebox! RIP


What’s never explained in that movie is why Pesci had to die for killing the made man but De Niro and Liotta didn’t. Pesci is the one that Vincent was harassing (“Shine you shoes ... look like fuckin’ mirrors!”), which led to the murder, but all three of them were equally involved in the murder.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: noodles_leone on October 10, 2017, 10:33:26 AM
R.I.P Jean Rochefort (1930-2017) I remember him from The Tall Blond Man with One Black Shoe and Who Is Killing the Great Chefs of Europe? and others.

National mourning.
I would have absolutely loved to see him in Gilliam's Don Quixote film, it's a shame they had to stop production after he fell from his horse.

What’s never explained in that movie is why Pesci had to die for killing the made man but De Niro and Liotta didn’t. Pesci is the one that Vincent was harassing (“Shine you shoes ... look like fuckin’ mirrors!”), which led to the murder, but all three of them were equally involved in the murder.

My bet is that everybody knew Pesci was batshit crazy and everybody knew he clashed with Pesci while DeNiro was publicly trying to make things ok for everybody. Nobody knew DeNiro and Lliota were starting to go crazy too ("hubris is a bitch" could have been the title of half of Martin's movies). I would have put the blame on Pesci too.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on October 10, 2017, 11:44:53 AM
More than that, when it came time to investigating who was responsible, blame would have to fall somewhere. If you were the De Niro character you would figure this out and also a way to throw shit on someone while being very, very careful not to get any on yourself. The best person to bear the blame would be someone who was actually involved. But not everyone who was guilty had to pay up--mob justice doesn't require that. Personal betrayal, on the other hand, yeah.

It's been my contention that the De Niro guy had the whole thing set up all along. While Vincent was in the joint, De Niro was running his operations (including the bar where the killing is done). Vincent's return means surrendering things back to him, but De Niro has a good thing going, and wants to keep everything. He knows about the animosity between Vincent and Pesci and arranges them to run into each other at the welcome-home party. Nature takes its course. De Niro helps get rid of Vincent because he wants to keep things as they are. But someone is going to have to pay for Vincent's death and from the start De Niro has been planning to dump it Pesci. We don't see how he does that, but I'm confident that's what happens.

At an event where Nicholas Pileggi was present I ran this scenario by him and he told me it sounded plausible (he couldn't recall all the particulars of the events by then and didn't want to commit himself). Good enough for me.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on October 10, 2017, 12:18:19 PM
I never read the book. But it’s my understanding that the real-life guy that Pesci was based on (Tommy DeSimone, I think?) was a crackpot who just disappeared and that the movie’s depiction of what happened to him is simply one possible scenario. Is this correct? That could explain why in the movie only Pesci gets punished – because in real life he’s the only one of the three who disappeared. So the movie decided to invent a reason for how/why he died, without properly explaining why the same fate did not fall to his co-conspirators.


As to your theory, DJ, and your discussion with Pileggi:  did he seriously say that this is a plausible theory? Or is it just one of those, “we don’t know, so anything is possible” deals? If the former, was he referring to the real-life or the movie or both?

So you say that when De Niro keeps calling on the payphone to find out if Pesci was “made,” he’s really calling to find out if Pesci was killed. And when he goes crazy and is distraught upon hearing that Pesci is dead, it’s all an act?


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on October 10, 2017, 01:23:24 PM
I was talking to Pileggi about what actually happened. We never discussed the movie at all.

The movie is (mostly) from Liotta's POV, so not realizing DeNiro has set the whole thing up would be part of his limited understanding of events. And DeNiro on the pay phone would necessarily be an act if he had really been arranging things. But there's no reason to assume that the character would have had to be the actor DeNiro was to pull it off. This performance could be the result of Liotta projecting back on the event from a distant future.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on October 10, 2017, 07:23:38 PM
I was talking to Pileggi about what actually happened. We never discussed the movie at all.

The movie is (mostly) from Liotta's POV, so not realizing DeNiro has set the whole thing up would be part of his limited understanding of events. And DeNiro on the pay phone would necessarily be an act if he had really been arranging things. But there's no reason to assume that the character would have had to be the actor DeNiro was to pull it off. This performance could be the result of Liotta projecting back on the event from a distant future.

in a way it kind of makes sense, actually: De Niro is the one who informs Liotta that Pesci will be made, as if De Niro was in on the plan and Liotta was not. Then, on the big day, De Niro is constantly calling, extremely nervous, supposedly to hear the MOMENT Tommy gets made. I know that being made is the most significant event in the life of a gangster, but why is it so important for De Niro to know the MOMENT Tommy gets made? Can't he wait for Tommy to return triumphantly? It kind of makes sense: De Niro set it all up. And it's understandable that he'd be nervous until the moment the dirty deed was carried out.

Of course, not likely that Pileggi/Scorsese were thinking that. But it works out well, anyway  O0


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on October 11, 2017, 06:50:18 AM
in a way it kind of makes sense, actually: De Niro is the one who informs Liotta that Pesci will be made, as if De Niro was in on the plan and Liotta was not. Then, on the big day, De Niro is constantly calling, extremely nervous, supposedly to hear the MOMENT Tommy gets made. I know that being made is the most significant event in the life of a gangster, but why is it so important for De Niro to know the MOMENT Tommy gets made? Can't he wait for Tommy to return triumphantly? It kind of makes sense: De Niro set it all up. And it's understandable that he'd be nervous until the moment the dirty deed was carried out.

Of course, not likely that Pileggi/Scorsese were thinking that. But it works out well, anyway  O0
Dude, you've convinced me! Now I think I'm ready to hear about the OUATIA dream theory again . . .


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on October 12, 2017, 09:47:41 AM
Skip Homeier June 25, 2017 (age 86) we missed this one he was in some memorable films. R.I.P


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on October 19, 2017, 05:56:55 AM
Danielle Darrieux est morte.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on October 19, 2017, 09:49:45 AM
Danielle Darrieux est morte.

 :'(

RIP Madame de ....


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on October 19, 2017, 10:07:24 AM
R.I.P


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: dave jenkins on October 19, 2017, 10:27:08 AM
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/19/danielle-darrieux-obituary


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on October 19, 2017, 11:02:35 AM
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/oct/19/danielle-darrieux-obituary

wow, I did not know this:

Although she did not make any films during the occupation, Darrieux entertained German troops with the cabaret act she had perfected, and went on a publicity trip to Germany with a group of other French stars. Now married to the Dominican diplomat and polo player Porfirio Rubirosa, she became a target for criticism, but was exonerated after the liberation.

There's no explanation of why she was exonerated.

An unsourced item on her wikpedia page https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danielle_Darrieux says:

Under the German occupation of France during World War II, she continued to perform, a decision that was severely criticized by her compatriots. However, it is reported that her brother had been threatened with deportation by Alfred Greven, the manager of the German run film production company in occupied France, Continental. She got a divorce and then fell in love with Porfirio Rubirosa, a Dominican Republic diplomat and notorious womanizer. They married in 1942. His anti-Nazi opinions resulted in his forced residence in Germany. In exchange for Rubirosa's freedom, Darrieux agreed to make a promotional trip in Berlin.



Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: cigar joe on October 25, 2017, 09:24:21 AM
Fats Domino R.I.P.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/25/522583856/fats-domino-architect-of-rock-and-roll-dead-at-89 (http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/25/522583856/fats-domino-architect-of-rock-and-roll-dead-at-89)


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: drinkanddestroy on October 25, 2017, 07:17:36 PM
Fats Domino R.I.P.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/25/522583856/fats-domino-architect-of-rock-and-roll-dead-at-89 (http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/25/522583856/fats-domino-architect-of-rock-and-roll-dead-at-89)

Blue Wednesday ....


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: kjrwe on October 29, 2017, 04:30:00 PM
Fats Domino R.I.P.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/25/522583856/fats-domino-architect-of-rock-and-roll-dead-at-89 (http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/10/25/522583856/fats-domino-architect-of-rock-and-roll-dead-at-89)

Ain't that a shame. May he rest in peace.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Big Boss 1971 on November 12, 2017, 04:48:59 AM
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=60QDPPISeq0

Karin Dor  :'(


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: Jessica Rabbit on November 12, 2017, 08:58:45 AM
Higgy Baby, John Hillerman.


Title: Re: In Memoriam
Post by: kjrwe on November 12, 2017, 03:21:22 PM
John Hillerman was great in a handful of the Ellery Queen episodes which he did.

May he rest in peace.