Sergio Leone Web Board

Other/Miscellaneous => Off-Topic Discussion => Topic started by: titoli on May 15, 2016, 06:17:03 AM



Title: Beware My Lovely (1952)
Post by: titoli on May 15, 2016, 06:17:03 AM
Excellent thriller, but not a noir, of course. Because if this is noir, then The Spiral Staircase is a noir, which is not. And the whole spate of manic assassins like Halloween, Texas Chainsaw and what else would be neo-noir. Which I don't think is the case.  Anyway, it's 8/10. For once I like Lupino, but Ryan is, as usual, perfect in a difficult role.


Title: Re: Beware My Lovely (1952)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 15, 2016, 04:57:10 PM
I want to see this very much.


Title: Re: Beware My Lovely (1952)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 27, 2016, 09:44:15 AM
A mysterious benefactor sent me a disc of this (probably some wretch with a bad conscience). Anyway, my brief take:
Quote
Beware, My Lovely (1952) - 8/10. Psycho handyman Robert Ryan menaces isolated widow Ida Lupino, and it's all over too quickly! Man, does Ryan give a performance. Lupino is good too, never less than convincing. And although all the action takes place in a single location, I never felt I was watching a filmed stage play. Best of all, character actions are always plausible. No one does stupid things merely to oblige the plot.

There are some visual embellishments that are kind of fun. One in particular: the film is set during the Christmas season. Lupino thinks she is alone in her house, but Ryan is upstairs. As he comes down the stairs Lupino doesn't see him at first, but he is reflected in the Christmas ornaments on the tree and the audience sees several images of Psycho Ryan as he descends. A very clever bit that had me shouting with Christmas glee.


Title: Re: Beware My Lovely (1952)
Post by: titoli on May 27, 2016, 10:36:58 AM
"It's all over too quickly"?  :o I think it is just the right timing. Your steady diet of hollywooden crap persuaded you of the rightfulness of recent  practices which dilute the same amount of effects in 150', aiming to create the illusion that you're watching a serious movie and managing instead to create boredom.
But the question is: is this a noir?


Title: Re: Beware My Lovely (1952)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 27, 2016, 10:54:39 AM
"It's all over too quickly" is just an expression that means "I wish my period of ecstasy could have been prolonged indefinitely." Of course, the runtime is appropriate for the simple subject. More characters would have had to be introduced if the filmmakers had wanted a longer movie. And more characters is what a modern Hollywood movie would have had. No, I agree with you, Beware My Lovely is just right as it is.

People do call it a noir, don't they? Well, I agree with you again, for the very reasons you state. It is not a noir.

Ryan is the greatest American screen actor of the 50s, followed by Mitchum, and then Holden.



Title: Re: Beware My Lovely (1952)
Post by: titoli on May 27, 2016, 11:43:12 AM
I don't know if Mitchum is second to Ryan. They're different: Ryan plays characters, Mitchum plays Mitchum. 


Title: Re: Beware My Lovely (1952)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 27, 2016, 01:16:30 PM
I don't know if Mitchum is second to Ryan. They're different: Ryan plays characters, Mitchum plays Mitchum. 
I don't disagree. But I value acting over posing, even when the poseur is as interesting as Mitchum.