Sergio Leone Web Board

Films of Sergio Leone => Duck, You Sucker => Topic started by: Nobody on September 22, 2004, 10:40:38 AM



Title: Bogdanovich
Post by: Nobody on September 22, 2004, 10:40:38 AM
As most die hard Leone fans probably know, Peter Bogdanovich was supposed to direct this film with Leone producing. Now, my memory is is a bit rusty here, did Sergio take over before shooting started, or shortly after it had begun?

Would be interesting to hear Bogdanovichs thoughts on this project. Perhaps on the rumoured upcoming MGM special edition dvd?


Title: Re:Bogdanovich
Post by: DJIMBO on September 22, 2004, 11:06:22 AM
i was under the impression it was after a couple of days after leone pissed him off 2 much (according to frayling), and after leone tried 2 get someone else Rod Steiger demanded that Leone direct it, although he didnt really want 2.


Title: Re:Bogdanovich
Post by: Jon on September 22, 2004, 11:56:20 AM
In Oreste de Fornari's book 'Sergio Leone, the Great Italian Dream Of America', there is a section where Bogdanovich describes working with Leone which is very amusing. For example  Leone and Bogdanovich would meet for discussions about the story and Leone  

"would begin each new sequence with a rush of English and much acting, all of which he did in the middle of the room accompanied by dramatic gestures. "Two BEEEG green eyes?", he would usually begin, one hand leveled above his eyes, the other below to indicate what we would be seeing on the screen".

According to Bogdanovich, him and Leone fell out when Bogdanovich said he didn't like close-ups! He says he left the film just before Leone was about to fire him. Leone found another Italian  director [not named] to take Bogdanovich's place, but after two weeks Steiger and Coburn demanded that Leone direct it himself.


God knows what the film would have been like directed by Bogdanovich, has anyone here actually seen any of his films?
 


Title: Re:Bogdanovich
Post by: The Smoker on September 22, 2004, 03:12:31 PM
I think Leone got Bogdanovich (a replacement for his real goal Peckinpah) of the back of Targets, a Roger Corman cheapie he made around the same era as OUATITW. It has a similiar feel in how the charactors move around each other. Very simple. Its about a Sniper... and ofcourse his targets (the main one. a Boris Karloff in his twilight years)

But by time Leone got to him he was a different creature. A New Hollywood Kid. Made alot of Americana films with Cybil Shepard... remade his 'Last Picture Show' about 3 or 4 times through the seventies in different forms.

And there was supposidly some egos and mud been thrown about.

Its like this.. 15 years later....
- Leone was Shooting DeNiro in a NY 1930s dream like oriental opium den.
- Bogdanovich was making  Weepy 'Oscar Fodder' with Cher.  No contest ;D


Title: Re:Bogdanovich
Post by: DJIMBO on September 23, 2004, 09:25:08 AM
well, seeing as Bogdanovich loved Ford and thought Leone films were fascist, when in fact they are largely apolitical, with a touch of Marxism, and Leone thought Ford's films were sentimental, i think Leone probably had one over on Bogdanovich, lol.  ;D


Title: Re:Bogdanovich
Post by: Nobody on September 24, 2004, 07:32:33 AM
Speaking of Bogdanovich, I recently bought The Alfred Hitchcock Signature Collection, and each film comes with a documentary were Bogdanovich (among others) is interviewed. He also appears, occasionaly, on Sopranos.

By the way, The Last Picture Show is a great film, worth checking out. Haven't seen any of his other films though.


Title: Re:Bogdanovich
Post by: Concorde on September 30, 2004, 06:29:39 AM
Bogdanovich was sort of the Tarantino of the '70s, a brash youngster with an encyclopedic memory of scenes from the older films that Big Hollywood had forgotten, along with the ego & bravura to bluff his way through a few projects which recycled the best bits from the golden oldies he treasured. Unlike Leone, he NEVER showed any real originality or vision, although the two share a love for homage and visual quotations of earlier classics.

According to Peter Biskind's excellent book on '70s Hollywood, Bogdanovich apparently spent lots of time sitting on his couch, watching old movies on TV while he sucked on fudge-sicles and tossed the licked-clean wooden sticks over his shoulder behind the furniture. (Ick!!)

Bogdanovich quit the DUCK YOU SUCKER project before a foot of film was rolled. (Maybe he was disappointed to learn it was not about a hero whose goal is avoid vollies of flying fudge-sicle sticks!)  Another Italian director began shooting it, but Steiger & Coburn got fed up with him right away and insisted Leone take over as director. Which of course is what happened.

I talked to someone at MGM who said Bogdanovich was approached to participate in the DVD "extras" on the forthcoming DYS:Special Edition, but he declined. I bet he regrets not having proceeded with directing DYS, as it's certainly a more memorable film (and one that holds up a lot better) than the ones he DID direct. Although THE LAST PICTURE SHOW won Oscars and PAPER MOON and WHAT'S UP DOC? made money, Bogdanovich's career is littered with disasters such as DAISY MILLER, AT LONG LAST LOVE, NICKELODEON, THEY ALL LAUGHED and TEXASVILLE (a desperate, misguided sequel to THE LAST PICTURE SHOW). By the mid-'90s he was reduced to shooting made-for-TV fluff such as TO SIR WITH LOVE II.


Title: Re:Bogdanovich
Post by: General Sibley on September 30, 2004, 11:01:12 AM
Touche', you blowed him up real good Concorde  ;D


Title: Re:Bogdanovich
Post by: Concorde on September 30, 2004, 08:53:09 PM
Well, the fudgesicle-sucker was overrated at the time and paid the price later. Hard.  :-\


"Son, I had twenty years in this outfit, when your idea of a good time was sittin' in front of the TV tube, watchin' Bugs Bunny and gnawing on your fudgcicle."
-- Warren Oates in BLUE THUNDER (1983)


Title: Re:Bogdanovich
Post by: Il Tramonto on October 20, 2004, 10:37:29 AM
So what parts of the film did Leone not direct? Anybody know?


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: Juan Miranda on July 09, 2005, 05:10:50 PM
According to Frayling, Giancarlo Santi began directing the film when it reached production stage. There, sadly,  any certainty ends, as both Leone and scriptwriter Donati fail to agree for how long he was employed in this post. Leone says 10 days. Donati not even a whole day.

Santi, like Leone when he got his big break, was known as a top assistant director at the time. If you've ever been on a movie set, you'll know that nobody seems to have a tougher production job than these guys. They run around everywhere yelling, keeping the film on schedual, while the director (these days anyway) spends most of his time slumped in a chair watching a little TV monitor. Santi had worked on Leone's two previous features.

I've watched and enjoyed a lot of Bogdanovich's movies, the early ones anyway. TARGETS is a fine little film, with a great performance by Boris Karloff. THE LAST PICTURE SHOW is excellent, but much of that is due to its arresting black and white (mostly wide angle lensed) cinematography. Hell, I even enjoyed NICKLEODEON. But. Did Bogdanovich have the cohones to direct a film with a script like GIU LA TESTA? Never in a million years. Indeed, despite his credentials as a great critic and admirer of John Ford's, I'm not sure he even understood Western's very well at all.

"Leone's pictures are cynical, which Ford never was. And there's no poetry in them." he tells Frayling. No poetry in Leone!!? Is this man blind? Clearly, judging by how bad his directing has been for the last couple of decades.

In old age now he seems to be purely living off the fact that he once knew many of the American greats like Orson Welles and John Ford. All a bit pathetic really, and he merely comes accross as a waspish little prick in a bow tie.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: cigar joe on July 09, 2005, 06:37:19 PM
Quote
In old age now he seems to be purely living off the fact that he once knew many of the American greats like Orson Welles and John Ford. All a bit pathetic really, and he merely comes accross as a waspish little prick in a bow tie.


Don't think you can say it any better than that, lol.
I've caught him a few times now on TCM, I think its the essential film series that he hosts.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: Walton on July 11, 2005, 12:27:36 AM
Not that I wildly disagree with any of this, but in some small defence of Bogdanovich, he put together an essential book on Orson Welles (pretty much a whole book of interviews - a great read) and publicly defended Welles against unjust attacks like Pauline Kaels scabrous, full-of-lies book on Citizen Kane which cost Welles financing on two movies. Bogdanovich has also been actively attempting to have Welles last film, The Other Side of the Wind, finished and released. I think Bogdanovich is probably a better film historian than director, but at least his heart seems to be in the right place.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: cigar joe on July 11, 2005, 04:22:07 AM
Good for that. At least that sounds as if he's making amends, now, I'd like to hear what he now has to say about Leone in retrospect.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: cowboy-cine on July 22, 2005, 10:22:18 PM
[quote author=Walton liI think Bogdanovich is probably a better film historian than director, but at least his heart seems to be in the right place.

Let's not get too carried away here. Artists (directors probably most of all),  usually care about their work more than anything (except themselves), and will sacrifice everything/everyone else to bring about their "vision".

Bogdonavich used his work and relationship  with Welles to gain respect  in Hollywood and first heard about "Picture Show" from actor Sal Mineo while writing about John Ford on location for "Cheyenne Autumn"

Mineo had hoped produce/star in the film, and ended up on the outside.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: Walton on July 23, 2005, 12:19:02 AM
Well, I base that particular opinion on books I've read, interviews, dvd's etc. However, as I've never actually met the man, I'm left to draw my conclusions from the evidence available to me.

I do agree with your observation that directors will often sacrifice everything/everyone to bring about their vision, but it's not a blanket description that can be applied to everybody. Of the four working film directors I personally know, I could only apply that particular description to one of them - the other three are reasonable human beings who treat the people they collaborate with in a respectful way. Like anything, it depends on the individual and how they operate. That said, of course, that's just my personal experience in the film business and maybe I'm lucky to know decent people.

If anything, the people in the film industry I've found to be the worst are actually the distributors, who lie, cheat, steal and burn bridges like there's no tomorrow... but that's a whole other discussion. (Oh, and critics and journalists aren't a particularly wonderful mob either, I'd be attacking them far more readily than artists)



Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: grandpa_chum on July 24, 2005, 01:40:18 AM
I don't know why some of you have such disrespect for bogdanovich... in my mind ONE great film is enough for me to respect a director, and the last picture show is a great film and it's even mostly due to the direction, surprisingly.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: KERMIT on July 28, 2005, 07:22:45 AM
which is your least favorite leone film grand pa ?  :-\
and, what do you think would have saved it to make it a better film ?


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: grandpa_chum on July 28, 2005, 01:48:15 PM
for a few dollars more, nothing can really save it... the other 5 are just better... no i take that back, if the flashbacks were as good as the other films it'd be up there


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: grandpa_chum on July 28, 2005, 04:27:39 PM
To keep this somewhat on track, and not get sidetracked by grandpa_chum's tastes

hey i was as sideswiped by the question as anyone... i just answered it.

as far as santi, that would make sense, but you'd have to have more than just recycled cast to believe a rumor that he directed it, assuming what you refer to is just a rumor.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: grandpa_chum on July 28, 2005, 06:08:10 PM
I guess what i'm asking is...

is there any proof that even indicates that santi was present during the filming of the movie... he's certainly not crediting with anything. or is it just an out of the blue myth because santi had worked with leone before?


Title: Re:Bogdanovich
Post by: Leonardo on August 01, 2005, 11:15:19 AM

By the way, The Last Picture Show is a great film, worth checking out. Haven't seen any of his other films though.

Right  you are, Nobody! The Last Picture Show was definitely a good movie, but as far as his other films are concerned, take my word: you didn't miss much at all.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: Johny_Exhale on August 01, 2005, 11:52:51 AM
The Last Picture Show is definitly great, They All Laughed is excellent aswell, you definitly check that one out


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: Juan Miranda on August 01, 2005, 08:21:34 PM
I don't think there is any concrete evidence at all regarding what may or may not have been directed by Santi in GIU LA TESTA.

Nobody as far as I know has ever published shooting scheduals, wage slips, memos or even clapper board frame blow ups supporting any real info as to his input. All we have to go on is a conflicting "few days" from Leone to "one day" from Donati.

I guess some people, based on this info, put 2 and 2 together to make 5 and say that "the stagecoach" sequence wasn't directed by Leone.

But then you have to look at that sequence as a whole and ask "which part of it"? I guess because many folk have no idea how films are actually made, they assume they are always shot in sequence, therefor they come to the conclusion that because "the stagecoach" stuff  happens at the start of the film, Santi must have directed that bit.

But as these scenes, (before the arrival of Coburn) are split up into 4 different exterior locations shot in different parts of Almeria and 1 interior sequence filmed  in (I'm guessing) Cineccita and Almeria, that ads up to more work than Donati, or even Leone allows for Santi's time on the pic. Untill somebody roots around in some very old, dusty paperwork which may or may not still exist in a Roman archive someplace, we'll only have fanboy speculation to go on. ???

As for Santi working on other Leone movies, the evidence is there at imdb.com, but we all know how useless that often is. Frayling says Santi worked with Leone before, in his book, and if you have time to check on your DVD credits, let us know if he's there.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: Belkin on August 03, 2005, 03:48:57 PM
Bogdanovich's TARGETS is a classic. First saw it in the late 60's/ early 70's as part of a double bill alongside NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD! That night scared the bejayzus out of me until.....THE EXORCIST rolled into town!
Check out his SAINT JACK (1979). Neat little character driven movie!


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: cigar joe on June 13, 2007, 10:57:35 PM
The now infamous Michael Richards (Kramer) from Seinfeld used to do a hilarious Bogdanovich impersonation. Of What I've seen Bogdonovitch's Paper Moon & Last Picture Show are very good, but I don't see how he would have filmed DYS anything like a Leone film.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: The Peacemaker on June 14, 2007, 01:44:34 PM
but I don't see how he would have filmed DYS anything like a Leone film.

Exactly why he wasn't hired. And just because of that he held a personal grudge against Leone, commenting on how his films were savage. Yet he's a guest on The Sopranos, go figure.


Speaking of which, the series finale to The Sopranos sucked big time.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: moviesceleton on June 14, 2007, 02:02:45 PM
Speaking of which, the series finale to The Sopranos sucked big time.
No spoilers, please! Or at least warn before you make any. See, it's not here until the fall. :P


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: The Peacemaker on June 14, 2007, 02:52:03 PM
No spoilers, please! Or at least warn before you make any. See, it's not here until the fall. :P

I'm sorry, it was just incredibly bad. You'll see.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: T.H. on June 15, 2007, 07:01:12 PM
Bogdanovich even takes a shot at Leone's looks by saying something along the lines of him having a smallish, feminine looking chin when he was clean shaven. He also didn't enjoy Once Upon a Time in the West b/c he felt you had to see all the films that inspired it. This is the same man who claims to have seen thousands upon thousands of movies, so one would assume that West caters to the Bogdanovichs of the world. Although having knowledge of the Hollywood westerns that West draws from certainly elevates the overall experience (atleast imo), it is certainly not a pre-req. for being able to appreciate or even enjoy the movie. Then again, this guy dons a purple scarf around his neck and has been irrelevant for three decades.





Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: moviesceleton on June 16, 2007, 04:27:42 AM
Then again, this guy dons a purple scarf around his neck and has been irrelevant for three decades.
Any man who wears a scarf, not just to keep cold away, is trying to look smarter than he is. At least that's my impression.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: The Peacemaker on June 16, 2007, 11:57:43 AM
I never liked Bogdanovich because of his prejudice towards Leone. Any so called film buff who completely hates one director's  body of work just because of a personal grudge is no film buff. I don't like Bogdanovich but I really enjoyed Paper Moon. Never saw any of his other work.

And besides, he always came across as some pompous ass for some reason.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: The Firecracker on June 16, 2007, 12:52:40 PM
including a pretty good early 70s SW called "the Grand Duel", which recycles some of the supporting cast from the stagecoach sequence of DYS (I don't know if that's why some of the SW geeks feel that he probably handled the stagecoach sequence or what).

This is incorrect. Not one actor on the Stagecoach, in the stagecoach sequence of DYS, is from "The Grand Duel".


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: uncknown on June 19, 2007, 04:41:24 PM
Did anybody mention that he married the younger sister of his murdered wife?

Bogdonavich had ONE film in him: TARGETS.

A classic but that's about it.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: The Peacemaker on June 19, 2007, 04:46:51 PM
I just plain don't like the guy.


I heard many things about Targets but never saw it. The only one of his films I saw was Paper Moon, and I enjoyed it. But I still don't like the guy.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: cigar joe on June 19, 2007, 08:45:38 PM
He comes across as a pompus ass.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: mike siegel on June 20, 2007, 03:58:23 AM
I always liked him.

I'm sure he is a pompus ass, but I don't have to live/work with him. I think he enriched my movie-life by really caring about Ford, Welles & Hawks. I have all his books, they're fine. DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD was one of the earliest docs about a film maker. He did retrospectives and studied those cats because he liked them and their work. That work dates back to the silent era so I think Leone was just too hip for him. I heard here Bogdanovich was in a way a 'Tarantino of that time'. I'd rather say Leone was a Tarantino of that time (bigger of course :)): His films were popular but too strong, like some of Peckinpah's too, to be regarded at what they were: masterpieces. Visual feasts, new ground in terms of telling the 'old story' their own new way. And what a way! For Tarantino it was slightly easier, he went away with an Oscar and the Palm immediately. But I still have discussions with people who can't see that KILL BILL 1 for example is not to be judged by the (non existing) story, but by the way he directed / presented the scenes. Awesome. A reason why actors/directors like him so much, he celebrated the medium and he is the right man for it. Just like his hero Leone.

Bogdanovich comes from a complete different background. He worships the big American masters. Rightly so. I don't held it against him, that he never got all of what the film history has to offer. I work a bit like him too: I write for magazines & books, make features and documentaries. So I have to concentrate on certain people, of course the ones I like best, like Peckinpah, Leone, McQueen, Polanski and many more :).

I'm sure I'm missing a lot that way. I like Fulci & Damiani for instance, but loath Franco & Castellari, so far. And I'm sure those made a couple of films too I could like... But to find those I won't screen their 50 films.

So the coupling of Bogdanovich and Leone was a big mistake from the start. Leone probably saw TARGETS when he was with Paramount the same year and probably DIRECTED BY JOHN FORD. He was guided by his heart I assume. An American, no matter the heritage, could never make an Italian western. Not even Tarantino. You can copy the food, but not the films. So they both just tried I guess. And Leone could never 'produce another director'. That's for sure. Another naive idea of Leone. To think another film maker would make a Leone-film while he was producing. Valerii tried nevertheless though, but then again he is Italian and could shout back in the same language.

One can dislike him because of the way he spoke about Leone, but he was never diplomatic about his speech. I kind of liked that, I like his interviews. And he does great imitations of Ford & Hawks. Awesome.

TARGETS is a favorite of many independents. Great story of how it was made. Come off very well too.
SHOW & PAPER MOON are great of course. As many of the New Hollywood pack he became arrogant and his projects mirrored that with failures. His private life surely helped messin' up his career: he fell in love with Sheppard during SHOW and left his long-time associate Polly Pratt. He then made movies for Cybill, thinking she was his Grace Kelly or Maureen O'Hara. His next girlfriend was murdered by her ex-lover. So I'm sure he was a little mixed-up. THose 70's were different, baby. Scorsese was so down he almost stayed down. But he came back. Others, like Bogdanovich and Friedkin, never really came back. Others even died, like Peckinpah.

He may be a prick. But I rather listen to him than to so-called movie-experts who never held a camera in their hands.
Just to dislike him because of the GIU LA TESTA incident would be too easy. Hawks didn't like THE WILD BUNCH, my favorite film. Then again RIO BRAVO is my No.3. One has to accept the fact that there are so many ways of doing your thing. Many dishes are not to be meant to be served at the same time.
His scarf is probably like Peckinpah's sun glasses, Stroheim's stick or Romero's scarf: something to hide behind, a lucky charm or the try to create an image. Fashion anyway. I don't judge the Italians because the 'important ones' tend to carry a pull-over, mostly little girls colors like purple, around their shoulders. But they never wear it, just carry it...


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: Novecento on June 01, 2009, 05:54:05 PM
Would be interesting to hear Bogdanovichs thoughts on this project. Perhaps on the rumoured upcoming MGM special edition dvd?

Here's his original 1973 article in New York Magazine:

Two Beeg Green Eyes (http://books.google.com/books?id=yeYCAAAAMBAJ&printsec=frontcover#PPA78,M1)


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: uncknown on June 04, 2009, 02:51:57 PM
today's quiz:

didya know that Mike Siegel and I "collaborated" on an article about Italian Westerns- one in particular?.
It's true.
can you name the film?


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: T.H. on June 04, 2009, 11:20:00 PM
I really like Targets, I didn't think PB was capable of pulling that off (it doesn't hurt having Sam Fuller giving re-writes). That's not to say that Paper Moon, Show, or anything else is void of merit, they're more suited for his style. My opinion of him has softened a bit, but his treatment of Leone is still very bothersome.

The circumstances surrounding the making of Targets is unbelievable. Basically Roger Corman told PB that he needed a film with Boris Karloff on set for 12 days or something close. Also, he needed to incorporate 20 minutes of his last film made with Karloff into the picture. Bogdanovich had the idea for the opening (which is fantastic, even if borrows a bit from Contempt, maybe others I'm forgetting), was suggested by a colleague to make a film about the Austin, Texis Watchtower massacre, wrote the script and had Fuller re-write the thing for him. That's crazy.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: dave jenkins on April 25, 2015, 03:18:43 PM
http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film5/blu-ray_reviews_67/paper_moon_blu-ray.htm


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 26, 2015, 08:56:10 AM
I just read mike siegel's very interesting post on Bogdanovich.

But I believe mike is wrong in his implication that Bogdanovich only liked the American filmmakers. Sure, he loved Hawks and Welles and Ford, but he has said that the greatest of them all may be Renoir. His interview book may have been with almost all Americans (including many who began in Europe but then came (or fled) to America) but that's probably largely because he can't interview foreign filmmakers if he doesn't speak their language. Bogdanovich may have grown up with American films and disagreed with the nerdy critics of the time who thought only European movies were art, but I believe Bogdanovich is knowledgeable and admiring of European film(makers), not just American.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: mike siegel on April 27, 2015, 04:33:04 AM
Of course I don't think Bogdanovich only appreciates three single film makers...
Any serious cineast at least admires 100 people working with films. Or 200...
Yesterday I watched JEUX INTERDITES (Rene Clement, 1952) for the very first time.
One of the best films ever made. I'm happy I still have fantastic classic films to discover.

But you have to stop somewhere. I was even shocked when I saw HOW MUCH I wrote up there.
Must have been a lousy month work-wise for me, if I had THAT MUCH time left to defend ol' Peter :).

TARGETS is of course my favorite :). I saw it in a cinema in 1979, I was quite taken by it being 12 years old.
Great example of pure film making - without much money available, like DUEL... It was a great time for film making.
PAPERMOON, LAST PICTURE SHOW and THE MASK are great too. Too bad he lost it a little bit
in the mid 70s. But so did many of the other star directors of the 70s (NEW YORK,NEW YORK; CONVOY; QUINTETT...)


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: stanton on April 27, 2015, 05:18:31 AM
Yesterday I watched JEUX INTERDITES (Rene Clement, 1952) for the very first time.


Sheeet, I missed it. Completely forgot about it yesterday evening.


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: mike siegel on April 27, 2015, 09:08:56 AM
I bought the blu-ray hours later... a buy you won't regret!


Title: Re: Bogdanovich
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 27, 2015, 01:57:27 PM
Of course I don't think Bogdanovich only appreciates three single film makers...
Any serious cineast at least admires 100 people working with films. Or 200...
Yesterday I watched JEUX INTERDITES (Rene Clement, 1952) for the very first time.
One of the best films ever made. I'm happy I still have fantastic classic films to discover.

But you have to stop somewhere. I was even shocked when I saw HOW MUCH I wrote up there.
Must have been a lousy month work-wise for me, if I had THAT MUCH time left to defend ol' Peter :).

TARGETS is of course my favorite :). I saw it in a cinema in 1979, I was quite taken by it being 12 years old.
Great example of pure film making - without much money available, like DUEL... It was a great time for film making.
PAPERMOON, LAST PICTURE SHOW and THE MASK are great too. Too bad he lost it a little bit
in the mid 70s. But so did many of the other star directors of the 70s (NEW YORK,NEW YORK; CONVOY; QUINTETT...)

I used Hawks, Welles, and Ford as examples because those are three American filmmakers that Bogdanovich mentions frequently, those are among his favorite. Not that I thought you were saying he only liked those three.
it just seemed to me that you were implying that he wasn't as into the European filmmakers as he was the Americans, and I just don't think that's so. As I said, it makes sense that most of his interviews are with Americans because he can speak their language, but if you read his writings about the films and filmmakers he admires, it seems to me that he is as appreciative and knowledgeable of the Europeans as he is of the Americans.

he has an interesting story (I think in WHO THE DEVIL MADE IT) about how he went to Germany with Cybil Shepherd and found that some film archive had prints of NINE obscure Lubitch films (I guess that nobody had  seen them since their original theatrical run, but this German archive had prints of these nine films, they must have been deposited there decades earlier?.)
Anyway, the only open slot Bogdanovich could find in a cinema (or screening room?) was a single 13-hour slot. So he and Shepherd sat in that room for 13 hours and watched nine obscure Lubitch films.
Bogdanovich said, as I recall, that one of those movies was one of the five funniest films he has ever seen.
I don't recall the names of any of these movies or whether they have since been released on DVD.