Sergio Leone Web Board

Other/Miscellaneous => Off-Topic Discussion => Topic started by: noodles_leone on March 29, 2017, 05:59:07 AM



Title: Cannes 2017
Post by: noodles_leone on March 29, 2017, 05:59:07 AM
Claudia Cardinal is on the poster:

(http://www.jeanmarcmorandini.com/sites/jeanmarcmorandini.com/files/corps/capture_decran_2017-03-29_a_13.39.52.jpg)

Of course, people are complaining because of the photoshoped silhouette to make her look thinner:

https://twitter.com/Limportant_fr/status/847054663602065408


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: dave jenkins on March 29, 2017, 03:26:48 PM
Here's something in English on the controversy: https://www.yahoo.com/news/cannes-festival-accused-airbrushing-stars-thighs-165848157.html


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Novecento on March 29, 2017, 06:40:46 PM
Quote
The actress, now 78, was unimpressed by watched she called a "fake row".

Weird typo - it makes it seem like the article was dictated into a machine rather than typed....


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: drinkanddestroy on March 29, 2017, 11:45:16 PM
I think airbrushing is stupid. Sure, it happens all the time. I don't pay any attention to fashion magazines or celebrity magazines or any of that crap.

Oh, and btw, I do not find ultra-skinny girls attractive. I prefer nice curves  :-*


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: noodles_leone on March 30, 2017, 12:38:44 AM
I think airbrushing is stupid. Sure, it happens all the time. I don't pay any attention to fashion magazines or celebrity magazines or any of that crap.

Oh, and btw, I do not find ultra-skinny girls attractive. I prefer nice curves  :-*

#nofilter #ilovemycurves #sorrynotsorry


(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2016/04/06/21/32E9048200000578-0-image-m-14_1459975808608.jpg)


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: dave jenkins on March 30, 2017, 09:16:16 AM
Is that supposed to be Trump or Richard Linklater?


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: noodles_leone on March 30, 2017, 09:17:20 AM
That is supposed to be Mr President.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: drinkanddestroy on March 30, 2017, 07:36:33 PM
It's too bad it's blurred. I wanted to find out if Marco Rubio was correct about Trump's small hands indicating a small cock.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: noodles_leone on March 31, 2017, 04:51:59 AM
The non blurred version is easy to find (just google "Trump naked"). The artist trusts Rubio's depiction.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: PowerRR on March 31, 2017, 07:26:44 AM
Is that supposed to be Trump or Richard Linklater?
hahaha


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: dave jenkins on March 31, 2017, 10:35:04 AM
Hey, Roy picked up on that one!


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: noodles_leone on April 01, 2017, 08:05:30 AM
Hey, Roy picked up on that one!

What did you expect? He's the only other guy here watching Linktaker's films!
Also, he's probably jerking off now because of you.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: PowerRR on April 01, 2017, 04:03:16 PM
HEY YOU TWO

SHUT UP!!!!!!!!


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: drinkanddestroy on May 14, 2017, 01:54:30 PM
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_CANNES_FILM_FESTIVAL_PREVIEW?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

This year's Cannes Film Festival is quaking with change
NEW YORK (AP) -- The Cannes Film Festival, which celebrates its 70th anniversary this year, has historically been about as fond of change as day-old baguettes.

As much as its screens light up with the world's most daring, adventurous cinema, the French Riviera festival protects its traditions more closely than its dapper hosts guard the famous Cannes red carpet. But this year, even as Cannes prepares for a lavish birthday celebration, the Croisette is quaking with transformation.

This year's festival, which opens Wednesday with French director Arnaud Desplechin's "Ismael's Ghosts," contains films from Netflix (Bong Joon-ho's "Okja" and Noah Baumbach's "The Meyerowitz Stories"), movies from Amazon (including Todd Haynes' "Wonderstruck"), two high-profile television series (David Lynch's "Twin Peaks" revival and Jane Champion's "Top of the Lake"), and virtual-reality exhibits, including a multi-media installation by Alejandro Inarritu.

But trying to keep pace with today's fast-changing media landscape has come with plenty of challenges for a time-honored institution like Cannes. While unveiling this year's lineup, Cannes director Thierry Fremaux acknowledged the festival's internal hand-wringing over such issues. The festival, he concluded, is "a lab."

Yet some of the festival's experiments have already proven highly combustible. After an outcry from French theaters, organizers announced last week that beginning next year, films without the intentions of a theatrical release in France won't be eligible for Cannes' prestigious Palme d'Or competition - the festival's main slate of about 20 films. The move effectively bars Netflix releases from Europe's answer to an Oscar race. Netflix chief executive Reed Hastings bitterly called it "the establishment closing ranks against us."

It's not that such clashes aren't happening throughout the movie industry. But like everything else at Cannes, they're inflated at the festival, arguably the most passionate standard-bearer of cinema.

Sofia Coppola has been coming to Cannes since she was a child, accompanying her father when he debuted "Apocalypse Now." This year, she'll premiere one of the most anticipated films there, "The Beguiled," her fourth at Cannes and second in competition.

"It's still a place that's celebrating and loves international cinema, and the idea of cinema," said Coppola. "I feel like that's at the heart of it."

Cannes has often come under criticism for a lack of female directors - not to mention occasionally turning away women without high heels from red-carpet premieres. There are 12 female-directed films among the 54 official selections this year, including three in competition. (The other two are Lynne Ramsay's "You Were Never Really Here," with Joaquin Phoenix, and Naomi Kawese's "Radiance.")

"I guess there's three instead of two this year," said Coppola. "I think they have more there than we do here. There's always been more of a tradition of female filmmakers in France and internationally."

Coppola's film is its own kind of correction. It's a remake of Don Siegel's 1971 Civil War drama about a Union soldier (Clint Eastwood, who will also be at Cannes to teach a masterclass) hiding out in a Southern girls school. Coppola wanted to flip the story to a female point of view.

Like many other filmmakers, Coppola was racing last week to put the final touches on her film before the festival. But Inarritu was arriving in Cannes days early to finish building the space for his "CARNE y ARENA (Virtually Present, Physically Invisible)," a three-part installation about immigrants and refugees.

"I'm very curious to see how people from cinema will react to this," said Inarritu. "It's an individual experience. It's one-by-one and it's six minutes-and-a-half. This is not a community experience. That will give the festival something extraordinary to experience and see what people think about it."

Inarritu said he always envisioned the piece in a museum (it will launch later in Milan's Fondazione Prada). But he said after he showed it to Fremaux, the Cannes director was "very insistent" that he bring it to the festival. "I thought it was an interesting proposition," said Inarritu. "Let's see what happens."

While virtual reality is now widespread on the festival circuit, Cannes has been more reluctant to embrace it. It has, though, sometimes showcased TV works, notably Steven Soderbergh's HBO Liberace drama "Behind the Candelabra" and Olivier Assayas' miniseries "Carlos."

The dust-up with Netflix has put a brighter spotlight on "Okja" and "The Meyerowitz Stories."

"It's an interesting issue and it's going to continue," said Joon-ho, "Okja's" director. "While that was all happening, I was focused on post production in Los Angeles. That's really where my focus is. These other bigger industry-wide issues will naturally get resolved with time."

"Okja," starring Tilda Swinton and Jake Gyllenhaal, is the South Korean director's follow-up to "Snowpiercer." It's a fantasy about the gulf between humans and animals, individuals and corporations.

"After all this talk has come and gone," said Joon-ho, "I hope people just focus on the film itself and the story and the images."



Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: dave jenkins on May 14, 2017, 02:55:50 PM
zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz . . .


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Novecento on May 15, 2017, 10:00:41 AM
Yet some of the festival's experiments have already proven highly combustible. After an outcry from French theaters, organizers announced last week that beginning next year, films without the intentions of a theatrical release in France won't be eligible for Cannes' prestigious Palme d'Or competition - the festival's main slate of about 20 films.

I can see where the Cannes festival is coming from with this. It's Cinema Paradiso versus binge watching.

The move effectively bars Netflix releases from Europe's answer to an Oscar race.

"Europe's answer..."  ??? Last time I checked, the Cannes film festival went back a little further in time than the founding of the EU. I think "version" rather than "answer" would be a better choice of words here.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: drinkanddestroy on May 15, 2017, 10:05:19 AM

"Europe's answer..."  ??? Last time I checked, the Cannes film festival went back a little further in time than the founding of the EU. I think "version" rather than "answer" would be a better choice of words here.

How can you compare the Oscars, in which all (American) films compete, and a festival in which only 20 films compete?


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Novecento on May 15, 2017, 12:06:12 PM
How do you mean? Aren't the films with a chance of winning a Best Picture Oscar (currently set at 10) and those with a chance of winning a Palme D'Or (set at 20) all pre-selected regardless?


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: drinkanddestroy on May 21, 2017, 02:50:45 PM
How do you mean? Aren't the films with a chance of winning a Best Picture Oscar (currently set at 10) and those with a chance of winning a Palme D'Or (set at 20) all pre-selected regardless?

point is, not every film premieres at Cannes. There are many great films that never premiere at Cannes and therefore are ineligible for the Palme d'ore. Every movie is eligible for Oscar contention.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: drinkanddestroy on May 21, 2017, 02:51:40 PM
Clint Eastwood at Cannes for 25th anniversary of Unforgiven

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/E/EU_FRANCE_CANNES_CLINT_EASTWOOD?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Novecento on May 22, 2017, 07:58:33 AM
point is, not every film premieres at Cannes. There are many great films that never premiere at Cannes and therefore are ineligible for the Palme d'ore. Every movie is eligible for Oscar contention.

Every movie is eligible for Cannes. You just need to submit it and then cross your fingers. Of course if you choose to show it somewhere else first then you miss your opportunity, but that's your choice.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Milan NS on May 22, 2017, 03:49:35 PM
Looking forward to Polanski's new film.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: stanton on May 23, 2017, 02:31:12 AM
Looking forward to Polanski's new film.

Really?

He was great in the 60s, and in the 70s he made his best film Chinatown, but the others were already not that interesting in this decade, and since then his films are not very interesting for me. Then, suddenly, his last one was a positive surprise. But I still don't expect anything from him.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Novecento on May 23, 2017, 07:40:01 AM
Really?

Yes, really.

His last big-budget release "The Ghost", which was horribly renamed "The Ghost Writer" in North America, was absolutely fantastic ("Carnage" and "Venus in Fur" were much smaller scale affairs).


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: stanton on May 23, 2017, 10:06:47 AM
Yes, really.

His last big-budget release "The Ghost", which was horribly renamed "The Ghost Writer" in North America, was absolutely fantastic ("Carnage" and "Venus in Fur" were much smaller scale affairs).

Wasn't Ghost Writer the original title?

It was good, but nothing special (maybe 7/10), and Carnage was comparatively awful (4/10), and Venus in Furs the big surprise (8,5/10)


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Novecento on May 23, 2017, 10:48:40 AM
Wasn't Ghost Writer the original title?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ghost_(Harris_novel) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Ghost_(Harris_novel))

It was stylish and very atmospheric. I haven't read the novel, but the conversion into a screenplay was deftly handled.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: stanton on May 23, 2017, 01:03:34 PM
The The Ghost is the book title, The Ghost Writer is the film's original title.

Can't remember that much style.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Novecento on May 23, 2017, 02:57:45 PM
It had the original title in the UK release:

(http://www.trespassmag.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/ghostwriter_poster-535x4011.jpg)


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: stanton on May 23, 2017, 03:19:15 PM
But in France and in Germany, the other co-producer countries, it was The Ghost Writer, and that is everywhere cited as the original title.

It seems the Brits changed it to correspondent with the book.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Novecento on May 23, 2017, 10:07:28 PM
But in France and in Germany, the other co-producer countries, it was The Ghost Writer, and that is everywhere cited as the original title.

It seems the Brits changed it to correspondent with the book.

I would argue that the working title of "The Ghost" was changed for release in other English-speaking regions through another unfortunate case of dumbing down that destroyed the ambiguity of the original title. Perhaps it was only kept in the UK due to the popularity of the original book there? Translations into other languages aren't really valid since rarely do words match 100% across different languages however closely related, although I would note that some other countries (e.g. Denmark, Russia, Lithuania) went with a straight translation of "The Ghost" too according to IMDb.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: stanton on May 24, 2017, 02:12:23 AM
Yes, but The Ghost Writer is everywhere given as the film's original title. Wiki, IMDB, film papers etc


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Novecento on May 24, 2017, 05:21:29 AM
Probably because that is what it was called in the US, not because it was the original name.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Milan NS on May 24, 2017, 12:50:50 PM
... and in the 70s he made his best film Chinatown, but the others were already not that interesting in this decade...

No love for "The Tenant"?

(https://mraybould.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/nightsweats.jpg)

Trelkovsky rules!


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: stanton on May 24, 2017, 02:01:04 PM
No love for "The Tenant"?



Unfortunately not, it was for me already already a pale variation of his 60s work. But I know that it has its admirers.


Title: Re: Cannes 2017
Post by: Milan NS on May 24, 2017, 04:06:31 PM
Red carpet 2017. Nice to see Roman standing next to David Lynch, having a great time.  O0

https://www.facebook.com/festivaldecannes/videos/1485224674831797/?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE