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Films of Sergio Leone => Other Films => Topic started by: cigar joe on December 11, 2004, 05:45:10 AM



Title: Warlock (1959)
Post by: cigar joe on December 11, 2004, 05:45:10 AM
Warlock, a quote for SL on right now on AMC!!! Sat morning 7:30 AM


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: cigar joe on December 12, 2004, 09:40:47 AM
Ok saw this BL wewstern on AMC (Henry Fonda, Richard Widmark, Anthony Quinn) had a few quotes used by Leone, it has the scene just after the part where in FAFDM when Lee Van Cleef strikes the match on Wild's hump. Warlock has a similar scene as the one where Wild goes for his gun and is prevented in doing so. Widmark does the same thing to one of his fellow ranch hands, (no match no hump).

Warlock also has a lot of backshooting attempt scenes where the attempts both out in the open and consealed under or behind things are foiled, think the end of AFOD. It has a markmanship target practice with bottles, where have we seen these before, a SW staple, lol.

Its very loosely based on the story of the Earps in Tombstone. Townies against cowboys

Fonda is a hired gun hired by the town to be the town Marshall, he has a reputation for cleaning up towns his getup also has twin gold handeled colts (based on Earp). (another SW qoute in another film)

Quinn is a crippled gunfighter gambler friend of Fonda(Doc Holliday anyone?) who sets up shop in Warlock

Fonda and Quinn are dressed similar to LVC, but the film also is incredibly slowed down by two love interests between Fonda with one, and  Quinn and Widmark with the other. Its just a good primer flic to see what things in the AW's were like "BL" Before Leone.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: spag fan on December 13, 2004, 03:16:22 PM
I caught this one a few months back and enjoyed it a good bit. With Fonda, Widmark and Quinn, how could you go wrong? :)


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 24, 2005, 02:37:54 AM
The new DVD version is out and it looks pretty good in Cinemascope. I watched it last weekend.

Hey, Groggy, you've seen this film before, right? Why didn't you mention that LQ Jones has a brief scene?(he's the guy who tips Quinn to the fact that Dorthy Malone and the guy gunning for Fonda are coming in on the stage). Man, Groggy, and I thought you were a Wild Bunch fan! lol


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Groggy on May 25, 2005, 05:12:29 PM
The new DVD version is out and it looks pretty good in Cinemascope. I watched it last weekend.

Hey, Groggy, you've seen this film before, right? Why didn't you mention that LQ Jones has a brief scene?(he's the guy who tips Quinn to the fact that Dorthy Malone and the guy gunning for Fonda are coming in on the stage). Man, Groggy, and I thought you were a Wild Bunch fan! lol

I said I saw the last hour of it, not the whole thing.  :P


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 26, 2005, 08:47:38 PM
Sorry. Just trying to bust your chops....lol


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: boardwalk_angel on June 20, 2005, 08:34:40 PM
I just finished watching this on Fox Movie Channel........& I have to say that I was impressed. I want to think about this one for awhile...but for now...yeah...I picked up on the Earp persona...a bit of Hickock too (If I remember correctly...Wild Bill was a faro dealer,...... like Fonda's character...among other things... as well).
An early (1959) somewhat revisionist western...myth breaking but doesn't hammer you over the head with it...adult....well played by Fonda & Widmark.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 20, 2005, 09:49:08 PM
According to some, this was Leone's favorite Western. SL certainly singled it out, and perhaps we can say at the very least it was his favorite non-Ford Western. Certainly the Fonda character resonated with him. Also, it is interesting to note that the film's final act has 3 separate showdowns; talk about value for money (and an early example of a film that follows Leone's 10-minute rule).


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: uncknown on May 09, 2009, 12:21:36 AM
i wanted to see this film since I remember reading it was one the westerns "quoted" in OUITW. SO, i just watched it on dvd.
There are a coupla scenes which might have influenced Leone:
- Widmark getting his hand smashed so he cant draw (FISTFUL)
- Quinn wanting to make sure Fonda is thought of as a great hero (NOBODY)
- Fonda's general attitude (OUTW)

but the film most inspired by is APPALOOSA. It is practically a remake!
and the gunman with the bum leg (Quiinn) turns up in 3:10 to YUMA (Bale).

agree/disagree?


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: cigar joe on May 09, 2009, 04:03:36 AM
Warlock also has the scene where a gunman is prevented from drawing his gun much like Kinsky is prevented by Brega from drawing on Van Cleef in the El Paso saloon .in For a few Dollars More.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Groggy on May 09, 2009, 06:41:12 AM
The film's influences on OUATITW were noted in the 30 Westerns In Once thread.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Dust Devil on February 13, 2010, 11:01:47 AM
I maybe missing something but I just don't see why is this movie supposed to be relevant to the later SWs? There are a few connections to Sergio Leone's Westerns but they do not work as catalysts to the upcoming entire sub-genre, or at least I don't see it that way. For me it's quite the contrary: this looks like (almost) the (very) best you can drain from the essence of AWs. Lavish sets, gorgeous cinematography, a bunch of superstars playing distinctive characters, a semi-daring script and a few cutie chicks to use in one or two forced romances. It's all there, and in this case it works fine. It could have been even better if the gunfights were handled with more attention.


7.7/10


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Groggy on February 13, 2010, 11:56:18 AM
I maybe missing something but I just don't see why is this movie supposed to be relevant to the later SWs? There are a few connections to Sergio Leone's Westerns but they do not work as catalysts to the upcoming entire sub-genre, or at least I don't see it that way.

I've never really heard it considered otherwise. Some homages and a neurotic portrayal of gunslingers.

Quote
It could have been even better if the gunfights were handled with more attention.

Dymytrk is a borderline hack. He has some good films under his belt but he can't be accused of having much in the way of style.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: stanton on February 14, 2010, 02:09:46 AM
A complex story is somehow wasted partly by over pretentious dialogues.

But with these great actors and a bunch of well staged gunfights is Warlock still a good film. 7/10

Maybe 8 with the Henry Fonda bonus.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Dust Devil on February 14, 2010, 07:59:20 AM
But with these great actors and a bunch of well staged gunfights is Warlock still a good film.

We maybe talking about two completely different movies? ???


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: T.H. on February 14, 2010, 09:42:36 AM
In my view, I'd say Leone was more influenced by the look of the movie than the content. The night scene with Quinn and Fonda--when Quinn shoots Fonda's hat--is referenced in FaFDM--the 'games' scene w/ Clint and LVC--and even feature similar lighting schemes. There are blue lights far off in the background; the scenes almost look identical. It's also a movie in which the characters move very slow or Leone-like from what I remember, not that this is something that is Warlock specific, but worth noting.

Groggs, I think your assessment of Dymtryk is way, way too harsh. I like his work, his movies look good for the most part; but I haven't seen as much from him as I would like.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on February 14, 2010, 10:29:30 AM
Groggs, I think your assessment on Dymtryk is way, way too harsh. I like his work, his movies look good for the most part; but I haven't seen as much from him as I would like.
Yeah, Groggy, WTF? This is the director who gave us Murder, My Sweet, Crossfire, and The Caine Mutiny.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Groggy on February 14, 2010, 10:49:20 AM
Fair enough, he deserves credit for The Caine Mutiny.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: T.H. on February 14, 2010, 11:12:12 AM
Yeah, Groggy, WTF? This is the director who gave us Murder, My Sweet, Crossfire, and The Caine Mutiny.

I'm going to watch The Sniper in the next week or so, is there anything else that rivals those three? I think I've only seen those + Warlock.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Dust Devil on February 14, 2010, 12:00:29 PM
but he can't be accused of having much in the way of style.

I think he, like many other directors (although being talented professionals), didn't quite understand that it's the gunfight that gives a Western that metaphysical (and at the same time (ironically?) - entertaining) aspect.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: stanton on February 14, 2010, 12:06:55 PM
We maybe talking about two completely different movies? ???

Ha ha I was thinking that too.

But the gunfights and the violence are surely amongst the best parts of Warlock.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on February 14, 2010, 12:08:19 PM
I'm going to watch The Sniper in the next week or so, is there anything else that rivals those three? I think I've only seen those + Warlock.
Probably not. But if you're a noir fan, Cornered, with wise-cracking tough guy Dick Powell, makes a good follow-up to Murder, My Sweet.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Dust Devil on February 15, 2010, 04:53:15 PM
Ha ha I was thinking that too.

But the gunfights and the violence are surely amongst the best parts of Warlock.

I'll probably give it another try in a couple of months or so, maybe I didn't pay enough attention. But the chances for that are rather slim, if I didn't see/feel it the first time I doubt I will the next time. :)


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on October 23, 2011, 08:47:41 PM
MOMA is putting this up on the big screen twice next month: Friday, Nov. 4 (@4:30) and Monday, Nov. 7 (@3:45). There's no way I can make a Monday showing, but Friday seems do-able. D&D, will I see you there?


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Groggy on October 24, 2011, 09:14:47 AM
I've been meaning to revisit this flick and this might be the incentive I need. O0


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on October 24, 2011, 10:38:19 AM
I've been meaning to revisit this flick and this might be the incentive I need. O0
You're coming to Manhattan?


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Groggy on October 24, 2011, 11:12:08 AM
No, but I can watch it on Netflix and be there in spirit.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on October 24, 2011, 02:48:24 PM
Do they deliver from McSorley's on Netflix? Otherwise . . .


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Groggy on October 24, 2011, 03:12:23 PM
I'll run over to Wal-Mart for some Heineken.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on January 23, 2012, 09:38:09 PM
As I said here http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=7500.msg154141#msg154141 this wasn't my kinda film, seemed like a queer Freudian psychodrama. I won't repeat those comments here, but add a few that i didn't mention:

A) there is a scene with a guy in a barbershop who runs out with half his face still full of shaving cream. Remind anyone of a somewhat similar scene in FAFDM? (Although, according to Frayling, that scene in FAFDM has a more direct reference to another movie I forget...)

B) I've always liked Fonda, Widmark, and Quinn, but I don't think this was Widmark's best role. Anyway, I am really surprised Widmark received top billing. Fonda was certainly the bigger star (I wasn't alive in 1959 but I'm sure he was bigger then as well, no? And his character was certainly the main character in the film as well.

A while ago, I saw a documentary on Fonda: in order to get the "role of his lifetime" in that (commie piece of shit  ;) ) The Grapes of Wrath, Zanuck said Fonda would have to do what he'd always resisted: sign a 7-year personal services contract with 20th Century Fox. Though he did get the "role of a lifetime," Fonda hated being under that contract, and nicknamed the studio "Penitentiary Fox"  ;D) Anyway, I was just wondering: maybe 2CF gave Widmark top billing cuz there was still some bad blood between 2CF and Fonda over that contract years earlier? This is totally a guess on my part, but what other reason can you think of fgor Widmark getting top billing in this movie? Heck, they even had Fonda introduce the movie on the trailer (included in the dvd's special features), so he musta been the bigger star....

C) I like the whole part theme of "the Law" and "committees" and "regulators." I often think about that whole concept, and about majority rule, and that stuff: how majority vote has often come to mean autonomy from basic human decency, (ie. politicians!). I think the movie pulled off that concept very, very well


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on February 02, 2012, 08:15:10 AM
A) there is a scene with a guy in a barbershop who runs out with half his face still full of shaving cream. Remind anyone of a somewhat similar scene in FAFDM? (Although, according to Frayling, that scene in FAFDM has a more direct reference to another movie I forget...)
My Darling Clementine, perhaps?


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on February 02, 2012, 09:14:32 AM
My Darling Clementine, perhaps?

No, I would have remembered if it was MDC. It was a movie I haven't seen. (In MDC, there is no face half full of shaving cream)


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on February 02, 2012, 08:35:18 PM
No, I would have remembered if it was MDC. It was a movie I haven't seen. (In MDC, there is no face half full of shaving cream)
Maybe Frayling refers to something else, but there certainly IS a scene in MDC with Henry Fonda with a face half full of shaving cream. He's in the process of getting lathered up when the barber is interrupted by the commotion caused by the drunk indian. Fonda then goes and subdues the indian, with his beard whiskers (but not his moustache) covered with cream.


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on February 03, 2012, 04:12:05 AM
Maybe Frayling refers to something else, but there certainly IS a scene in MDC with Henry Fonda with a face half full of shaving cream. He's in the process of getting lathered up when the barber is interrupted by the commotion caused by the drunk indian. Fonda then goes and subdues the indian, with his beard whiskers (but not his moustache) covered with cream.

my bad then, I must have forgotten.

The movie I am talking about is mentioned by Frayling in the FAFDM commentary. I'll post it here next time I listen to it


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: Groggy on October 08, 2012, 06:54:04 PM
Finally got to rewatch this yesterday. Full thoughts:

Quote
The '50s saw the emergence of the so-called "adult Western," oaters which place characterization and thematic baggage ahead of action. Edward Dymytryk's Warlock (1959) is a typical example. Long on ponderous talk, it's been subjected to more psycho-sexual dissection than any Western save Nicholas Ray's Johnny Guitar. The movie's interesting even if it doesn't quite hang together.

Warlock is a mining town terrorized by Abe McQuown (Tom Drake) and his gang. After McQuown's boys run Warlock's marshal (Walter Coy) out of town, the terrified townsfolk hire gunslinger Clay Blaisedell (Henry Fonda) and his sidekick Tom Morgan (Anthony Quinn) for defense. Clay and Tom set themselves up as lawmen while earning spare change through a faro game. The marshals start to wear out their welcome after Clay's rival dies in a hold-up, while McQuowan's gang starts encroaching on his territory. Reformed cowboy Johnny Gannon (Richard Widmark) becomes Deputy Sheriff and tries to prevent all-out war. Meanwhile, Clay's romance with Jessie (Dolores Michael) sends Tom over the edge.

Warlock is based on Oakley Hall's novel but plays as a deconstruction of the Wyatt Earp legend. Clay is a nastier Wyatt, buffaloing criminals and running vice rackets, with Tom a back-shooting, demented Doc. Writer Robert Alan Arthur even loosely re-stages bits of Earp lore: a shady stagecoach hold-up, the jurisdictional dispute between Clay and Sheriff Keller (Hugh Saunders), the uneven showdown between Clay/Tom and amateur cowboys. Warlock's anti-heroes are hired guns rather than "real" lawmen, tolerated without being liked. By film's end they're as unwelcome as McQuown's men. 

"Adult Westerns" are heavy on psychological baggage, from Anthony Mann's tormented heroes to the sexual weirdness of Johnny Guitar and Terror in a Texas Town. Warlock raises eyebrows with Tom, whose obsessive jealousy towards Clay implies an "unnatural" relationship. Perhaps I'd cotton to this if I hadn't heard critics claim just about every male film duo as "coded" lovers. If Tom is gay then Clay doesn't suspect it, least of all while pairing with Jessie. Perhaps we can call a spade a spade?

Warlock is a slow-burner but the powder dampens long before the climax. Arthur's script bogs down in talk and side characters: square Johnny Gannon doesn't fit the warped story, with love interests Jessie and Lily Dollar (Dorothy Malone) eating up valuable screen time. Dymytryk stages clever scenes like Clay's humiliation of a cocksure cowboy (DeForrest Kelly) and Gannon's torture by his old gang, while Joseph MacDonald provides stunning color photography. But Warlock lurches into silly melodrama with Tom's meltdown and Clay's ludicrous reaction. Dymytryk salvages things, though, with an inspired anti-climax.

Henry Fonda does fine, though his vaguely amoral Clay isn't noticeably different than his straight hero roles. Anthony Quinn is less successful, mixing a regrettable Southern accent with ham acting. Richard Widmark (Two Rode Together) navigates his conventional arc with finesse. Dorothy Malone provides a nice edge against Dolores Michaels' white bread princess. DeForest Kelly (Gunfight at the OK Corral) makes a sympathetic bad guy and Wallace Ford (The Man from Laramie) steals his scenes as a righteous Judge. The supporting cast brims with familiar faces: Vaughn Taylor (The Professionals), Whit Bissell (The Magnificent Seven), Joe Turkel (The Shining), Roy Jenson (The Wind and the Lion), Frank Gorshin and L.Q. Jones.

Warlock isn't quite the sum of its parts. Interesting in conception and full of great scenes, it lacks the cohesion to be a classic. 7/10

http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2012/10/warlock-1959.html (http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2012/10/warlock-1959.html)


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: dave jenkins on October 09, 2012, 06:22:55 AM
Quote
Warlock is based on Oakley Hall's novel but plays as a deconstruction of the Wyatt Earp legend. Clay is a nastier Wyatt, buffaloing criminals and running vice rackets, with Tom a back-shooting, demented Doc. Writer Robert Alan Arthur even loosely re-stages bits of Earp lore: a shady stagecoach hold-up, the jurisdictional dispute between Clay and Sheriff Keller (Hugh Saunders), the uneven showdown between Clay/Tom and amateur cowboys. Warlock's anti-heroes are hired guns rather than "real" lawmen, tolerated without being liked. By film's end they're as unwelcome as McQuown's men. 

Nicely observed. And succinct, too. O0


Title: Re: Warlock (1959)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on October 09, 2012, 05:51:23 PM
I enjoyed reading your review (as usual  ;)) although I don't rate this nearly as highly as you do. I found this pretty excruciating.

IMO there is no doubt whatsoever about the queer connotations, starting with the scene in which, after arriving in town and setting up their room, Quinn excitedly tells Fonda about how he has decorated the room, with the nice curtains, etc. I mean, come on. The queer references are as blatant as can be for 1959.