Sergio Leone Web Board

Films of Sergio Leone => Other Films => Topic started by: Banjo on November 21, 2005, 05:36:00 AM



Title: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Banjo on November 21, 2005, 05:36:00 AM
This ones a little bit like choosing between your mum and dad!In terms of enjoyment i rate all Sollima's SW's on par with Leone.As regards Corbucci,from what i've got Ringo & His Golden Pistol is very average,Navajo Joe and Hellbenders are pretty good,Django great,Great Silence fantastic,but i probably watch Companeros and the Mercenary more than Big Gundown or Face to Face.
OK, seeing that his movies exhibit a bit more fun(although Cuchillo's great fun in Run,Man,Run) and the missus  loves Franco Nero i'm plumping for Corbucci!


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Leone Admirer on November 21, 2005, 09:53:44 AM
I'm actually going to agree with you banjo. Corbucci is my choice at the moment but I really did enjoy Run Man Run.


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: grandpa_chum on November 21, 2005, 12:39:02 PM
If it were just the spaghetti westerns I would have to go with corbucci just slightly... but violent city and revolver are two of my favorite films and since sollima isn't lacking by much in the spaghetti category that means sollima gets the edge.


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Marco Leone on November 21, 2005, 01:53:16 PM
I think at his best it has to be Corbucci.  Great Silence, Django, Hellbenders, Companeros all sit proudly in my Top films.  But that Sollima fella had something going for him as well you know!!!   ;D


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: HEX on November 21, 2005, 04:10:15 PM
lol not many "intellectuals" here huh?

i too am in the majority

CORBUCCI all the way.


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: cigar joe on November 21, 2005, 10:10:06 PM
on the strength of Companeros, The Mercenary, The Great Silence,


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Banjo on November 22, 2005, 03:01:24 AM
Yeau,grandpa_chum when i eventually exhaust my SW wants i'd like to give Sollima's Violent City a look as i understand both Volonte and Milian star.
I'm quite surprised how this poll is panning out in favour of Corbucci.Although Sollima did just the three they are all of a very high standard.Big Gundown and Face to Face are in no way inferior to Great Silence and the Franco Nero trio but i guess,like myself,others have voted for the more inconsistent Corbucci because they enjoy ,slightly more than Sollima's, a select few of his westerns.
I watched The Big Country on TV last weekend and immensely enjoyed this very long and epic western from the late fifties.However i was surprised to read in A Pictorial History of Westerns by Michael Parkinson and Clyde Jeavons that this was universally panned by the critics but was still one of the most successful westerns of the era.This re-iterates that quality doesn't necessarily equate to the most enjoyable or vice versa!


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: boardwalk_angel on November 22, 2005, 04:08:46 AM
Gotta go w/ Corbucci...based on the quantity & quality of his work...the innovations that were copied again & again...the influence on the direction, content, & style of Italian Westerns.
Sollima did only 3.......although 3 very good ones.....& was also an innovator.....and influential..adding a political element to Italian Westerns that was copied by many others.

Don't have much respect for either of 'em.

Why?


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Banjo on November 22, 2005, 05:38:28 AM
I'm aware that both Corbucci and Sollima made numerous other movies in different genres.Apart from being knowing that Sollima made at least a couple of classic thrillers including Violent City and Corbucci did some comedy with Terence Hill and Bud Spencer i know nothing about the relative merits of their non-western efforts and it would be very interesting if someone could shed some light on this here?


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Banjo on November 22, 2005, 08:54:32 AM
OK Derringdo do admire any other SW directors apart from Sergio Leone?


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: grandpa_chum on November 22, 2005, 01:02:30 PM
Yeau,grandpa_chum when i eventually exhaust my SW wants i'd like to give Sollima's Violent City a look as i understand both Volonte and Milian star.

actually Violent City stars Charles Bronson and Telly Savalas... revolver is also highly recomended if you haven't seen it, that one stars oliver reed and fabio testi.... also two of the best morricone scores, if the pot needed any sweetening.


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Banjo on November 23, 2005, 04:58:15 AM
Thanks grandpa_chum,i was confusing the movie with The Violent Four(1968) directed by Carlo Lizzani which does star Milian and Volonte-sorry about that!
   Derringdo,i respect that you find Sollimas westerns pretentious and i guess this is in reference to the social and political comment being made.Personally i sometimes like to see a western offer more than just the usual brainless shoot 'em up especially if they can still deliver on the action front in which Sollima's certainly do.Its interesting that you don't like OUATITW and in some quarters this has also been called pretentious as well as the whole SW genre.By the way would you consider DYS in any way pretentious because of social and political content in evidence here for which Leone took some stick?
I'm not sure about what hype you are referring to regarding Corbucci's westerns.As regards the situation in the UK i wasn't born until 1967 but having looked into this a little ,any overhyping of Corbucci's movies wasn't always reflected in box office takings ,certainly in the English speaking nations where Django and Great Silence failed to get a distributer.I only became aware of these two movies when they suddenly appeared from nowhere on a late Saturday night 15/20 years ago.
I agree that the Mercenary must have been well publicised in both the UK and USA because this was Corbucci's most successful western in both countries but Companeros didn't fare as well!
My idea of overhyping is Lord of the Rings,Harry Potter,Star Wars and any major blockbuster starting with Jaws in 1976-well after the SW heyday.
The only place SW's are being hyped is where they should be-in SW books and websites like this.How else is someone gonna manage choosing between the Mercenary and Bad Mans River ?


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Banjo on November 23, 2005, 08:15:21 AM
I see what you are getting at Derringdo but if people want to rave about one or two directors then this is the place to do it.I can't waffle on about Leone indefinately without it getting tiresome and its great we have this "other films" thread so we can spread our horizons a bit.I get the impression that many SW fans have about a couple of dozen films of which(apart from Leone) Corbucci and Sollima form the main core and its inevitable that they're going to get talked about alot.
Many SW's are pretty cool,but personally my collection is more down to obsession dating back to when i watched SWs on TV as a kid rather than any street cred
and at 38(i know not that old!) i've gone a little bit beyond that stage!


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: cigar joe on November 23, 2005, 05:22:29 PM
I was living in New York City & vicinity until 1972 and I never remember seeing any advertizing or hearing any advertizing for any Corbucci films, the only non Leone SW's that I remember seeing adverts for were "The Big Gundown", "Death Rides A Horse", "The Stranger", "Sabata" and "The Ugly Ones". Also non SW but shot in Almeria "El Condor".


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: HEX on November 23, 2005, 05:45:27 PM
the only non Leone SW's that I remember seeing adverts for were  "The Stranger",

the STRANGER as in TONY ANTHONY'S a STRANGER IN TOWN? or THE STRANGERS GUNDOWN(AKA DJANGO THE BASTARD)?


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Banjo on November 24, 2005, 02:29:28 AM
With such an overwhelming support for Corbucci i think i'm gonna do the unthinkable and conduct a new poll suggesting that Corbucci's westerns are more enjoyable than Leones!!!(i can sense a huge mass of  deadly hushes away in the distance).


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: cigar joe on November 24, 2005, 05:17:14 AM
Stranger in Town


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: HEX on November 24, 2005, 12:24:46 PM
Stranger in Town

thanks JOE

HAPPY THANKSGIVING.


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: grandpa_chum on November 24, 2005, 07:02:51 PM
plus I simply don't have alot of respect for cinematic nihilism, which alot people claim is his core schtick.  One of my acquaintances here kind of talked me into giving him another chance-we shall see.

I am curious what exactly you mean by cinematic nihilism? Are you refering to the film's content, like philosophy, or are you refering to the actual method of direction(how he uses his camera)... I've heard the term used before but usually the director is definitively on one end or the other, corbucci qualifies for both


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Banjo on November 25, 2005, 02:57:25 AM
Probably referring to the apocalyptic(for lack of a better word!) vision of his westerns(well Django anyway!),the blood and guts and the fact that once the good guys lose out to the baddies for a change.


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: HEX on November 25, 2005, 12:32:52 PM
Probably referring to the apocalyptic(for lack of a better word!) vision of his westerns(well Django anyway!),the blood and guts and the fact that once the good guys lose out to the baddies for a change.


well all of his westerns(that i have sceen) are very "apocalyptic", not just DJANGO. the mexican revolution seen in COMPANEROS feels as if it is almost the end of the world. there are different fractions and small individual gangs wanting control over mexico, they torture, hang , shoot and rape anyone who opposes them. almost like the whole world has gone mad!


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Leone Admirer on November 25, 2005, 02:35:12 PM
The Mexican Revolution I've seen in Spaghetti's is like that of the Vietnam war in Apocalypse Now. It is happening around the main characters, it may affect them in a large way (they may have one point been fighting it) but most of the time its a horrific obsticle in the way of the overall goal.


Title: Re: Sergio Corbucci versus Sergio Sollima
Post by: Banjo on November 26, 2005, 02:22:01 AM
I find Mercenary & Companeros too much in comedy territory to be apocalyptic-but i know what you're saying!
I would say that Great Silence and Navajo Joe are probably closer in feel to the original Django vision.