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Films of Sergio Leone => Other Films => Topic started by: cigar joe on March 31, 2006, 07:55:17 PM



Title: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on March 31, 2006, 07:55:17 PM
Ok got this yesterday in trade for "Jubal" watched probably about 10 minutes so far and it's interesting, Its like Corbucci doing Anthony Mann, the Alps fill in pretty good for the Rockies, they actually look more like the Rockies in Montana and British Columbia, a bit more glaciated than the Rockies in Colorado.

More tomorrow......


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on April 01, 2006, 10:03:13 AM
<Some Spoilers>

The Specialist (Gli Specialisti) 1969 Dir. Sergio Corbucci, I watched it all the way through today, and I guess the best way to describe this film is that its frusrating.

Corbucci to me, remains an enigma he was able to make some almost flawless top notch Westerns, The Mercenary, The Great Silence & Companero's I consider the best. The Mercenary can compete with and beat most of the best American Westerns.

This should have been a great epic Corbucci film but it has serious flaws that serve to pull you right out of the story. The score for the most part is passable, though the title sequence however seems like it should be from a comedy flick about the French Riviera, it does not fit in.


The Specialist has got a few things that I personally really enjoyed seeing in a film, and other things that were absolutely out of context and continuity.

The great pieces of this film are the absolutely stunning backdrops of the Alps, like I mentioned in my first impression its like watching Corbucci do Anthony Man, reminds one of "The Far Country". One particular sequence has Halliday and the sheriff crossing a beautiful trout stream.

One little side story I enjoyed was Corbucci's addition of an interesting side story that had nothing to do with the main plot and that's the depiction of the town sherrif (Gastone Moschin) as a fisherman we see in in one section he is carrying his rod as he rides off on horse back, in another he has a stringer of trout, and another we see him standing in a stream & fishing.

The Town of Blackstone, Nevada is perched high in the Sierras, the townfolk hung the brother of famous gunfighter Hud (Johnny Halliday). The town thought he had stolen a cashbox of bills that he was entrusted with. Hud returns to seek vengence.

The real town boss is a wiley widow woman banker (Francois Fabian) who's name is, get this, Virginia Policutt, she uses sex just as much as cash to control the town.

There is also a Mexican Revolutionary band terrorizing the countryside, (though they do look a bit out of place, it may have worked if the film was set in the Sierra Madres of Mexico but its just a flaw of its distant Euro origins).

The towns center of action is the fancy saloon/brothel run by Sheba (Sylvie Fennec) complete with a red fez wearing bartender and a small orchestra.

The biggest, wierdest, and most frustrating inclusion in the film is the four street urchins of which its no exageration to call them Hippies, one of them has on a "Sergent Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band" overcoat with golden epalets and has an afro, another a pancho with big chains around his neck, the female wears a bandana around her forhead. One sequence has them smoking a huge joint, lol, WTF is up with this?

The character Hud looks cool he got a long dark overcoat (like a duster), a black hat with a silver hat band a weird sort of silver choaker (that's kind of out of place) and a chain mail vest that must be made out of "mithril" from Lord Of The Rings, it does make sence to wear during his knife fights , but its a bit ridiculous to ask us to believe it will repell bullets. Halliday is a bit lightweight in the part.

El Diablo (Mario Adorf) is a cool one armed Mex bandit, but seems a bit off in the high country. He flapps this arm (that has a sharpened spur attached to its end) menacingly.
 
The action sequences are top notch, except for the bullet deflecting chain mail, the film is just seriously flawed by its unbelievability. It has more nude sequences with Francois Fabian (ff and topless) than any previous Corbucci film I've seen .

I can't see what the motives of this film were, was it made for a ton money that was thrown at Corbucci for the promotion of Johnny Halliday, who knows, Corbucci can be hit or miss, this is a big miss, but it is worth seeing to see how it could have been another hit if it had been done differently.

Its a bit sloppy at places in its cinematography, one noticeable sequence is the "riding off into the sunset sequence" you see Hud ride off under a gate post the red sun a disk setting in the distance then you get a close shot of Hud against the sun and you see a turreted castle in the background  ;D.

Somebody has got to write a book on Corbucci so we can figure these inconsistancies out, I'd pay to find out WTF was going on in this man's head.

Django 1966 (ok)
Navajo Joe 1966 (eh)
The Hellbenders 1967 (not seen)
The Mercenary 1968 (great his GBU)
The Great Silence 1968 (great is FAFDM)
The Specialist 1969 (WTF, lol)
Companero's 1970 (great)


Shobary, is seriously out to lunch on this baby with his ranking maybe a 50 by my opinion, but then again you have to look at Shobary's criteria.

Django Kill did a good job fitting subs to the film, but this is definitely a film for Corbucci afficianados only, if its ever avilable here, try to rent first.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on April 01, 2006, 02:46:18 PM
so out of the two you have just required("And God said to cain" and the "specialist") which was your favorite?


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on April 01, 2006, 02:54:20 PM
Well, they are both very different films, one is definitely more cinematic (The Specialist), the other is more like a TV program (And God Said To Cain), if you like something more realistic get AGSTC if you don't mind fantasy Westerns TS.  8)

I was really hoping that The Specialist was a lost Corbucci Masterpiece, it ain't, lol.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on April 01, 2006, 02:57:04 PM
Well, they are both very different films, one is definitely more cinematic (The Specialist), the other is more like a TV program (And God Said To Cain), if you like something more realistic get AGSTC if you don't mind fantasy Westerns TS.  8)

I was really hoping that The Specialist was a lost Corbucci Masterpiece, it ain't, lol.


I'll be getting both.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on May 15, 2006, 12:40:59 AM
I shall be reviewing this pretty soon so I figured I would bump it back to the front page for easier access.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on May 15, 2006, 11:39:36 PM
Firecracker's review of "The Specialist".


Wow! And I thought Corbucci couldnt get any stranger. "The Specialist" is Corbucci's third entry to his "Mud and Blood" trilogy which began with "Django" and  which was followed by "The Great Silence". The Specialist himself Hud(played by pop French singer Johnny Halliday) is just as unique a hero as Silence and Django. Django had his coffin, Silence was a mute and Hud wears chain mail that can repel bullets(an inspiring and genius idea :D ). Out of the three, in the supposed trilogy, "The Specialist" is easily the weakest of the trio(but still a good spag).
The story is about Hud seeking revenge on the people who killed his brother. The culprits responsible are several "respectable" towns people including a widowed Bank owner who uses her sexuality to keep the town under her thumb. The film has alot of strange ideas like a gang of kids who dress like hippies and smoke pot, and a band of mexican "revolutionaries" that are led by El Diablo, a one armed bandit. El Diablo has a hook or a spur of some kind that is attached to where his right arm should be(unfortunatly it is never used).

The Plot is rather simplistic so I will not get into it, I will only mention that it plays out like a murder mystery with our Hero Hud playing detective. The plot does suffer from a lack of continuity. Some key elements are never explained while others ARE explained but fail to make sense. Take one example...

The sheriff is captured by the bandit El Diablo but later we see that he has some how escaped, this is never explained. It is things like this that really bring the film down. The whole time I was thinking that if this were done properly it could have been one of Corbucci's best. However what we have left is a wonderful spaghetti western with TOP-NOTCH action scenes(notice the emphasis on "top notch"). Unfortunatly there is not enough of it. The Gunplay is rather light weight for a Corbucci movie, there should have been a few more gunfights to keep the audience aroused throughout. But what IS there packs a punch so I am not complaining.

as for the brutality factor, it is the usual(unusual?) Corbucci stuff...

*warning spoilers ahead!*

A man's chest is crushed by a cashier register during a well done fist fight in a saloon.

The second to last gunfight of the film is pretty bloody.

and the the climax has the hippie kids force the towns folk to strip naked and crawl across the street.

*Spoiler's end*

The setting is in the high mountains of Arizona(which makes one wonder what El Diablo and his gang are doing there) which was filmed in the Alps. This makes for beautiful landscapes which Corbucci makes good use of throughout. The editing is a lot more alive and fast paced then the usual Corbucci oater, which gives the film more energy than any of his other westerns. This spag has placed itself on my top 30 list for sure. If I were shobary I would have given this an easy 85%. It could have easily reached 100% but it has far to many flaws. One of the flaws has to be the annoying hippie kids, they just hang around and do nothing until they finally pull a quick hostage situation towards the end(which is probably te best scene in the film!).

The Music: The Soundtrack is a mix of trippy and festive. It is not the best spag western music you can hear but it gets the job done. One wonders as to why Morricone was not called in to do some tunes. Him and Corbucci were already on speaking terms during Mercenary(which was made a year prior to Specialist) so why not make a another partnership during this movie? I guess he was called away on another film at the time.


overall: It is a shame that it has so many short comings because if they were non existant this could have been quite a classic. Either way Great spaghetti western! I would recommend this to any fan of the genre!

I can rewatch this again and again for sure. :)


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on May 15, 2006, 11:44:02 PM
didnt want to write this on my review so I will mention it here...

Shobary is nuts to have this as a higher ranking than The Mercenary and Django. I dont know what he was thinking!

also I would like to mention the hippie kids are a bit annoying. And what bugs me the most is...

*Spoiler*


they turn on Hud at the last second during the climax of the film and they want to kill him . The whole time I was thinking they were on his side. The film never gave me the idea that they were evil in any way. It just gave out the impression that they were rebellious teens just looking for a good time.

*spoiler end*


Joe did you feel the same way about the hippie brats?


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on May 16, 2006, 04:38:36 AM
Yea about the brats and the way they turned, but just their inclusion, and the "mithril" chain mail bullet deflecting vest  is enough to put this film in fantasy land for me.

You also didn't mention the out of place score.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on May 16, 2006, 10:26:40 AM
Yea about the brats and the way they turned, but just their inclusion, and the "mithril" chain mail bullet deflecting vest  is enough to put this film in fantasy land for me.

You also didn't mention the out of place score.


The chain Mail(as I mention in my review) was a brilliant idea that sets Hud apart from any other spaghetti anti-hero. I really liked it. And all of Corbucci's films are set in fantasy land anyway so what are you talking about?

The score didnt seem out of place to me. I think the whole movie seemed out of place ;D so the music fit properly.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on May 16, 2006, 10:37:41 AM
Also I would like to mention that DjangoKILL's restoration of this film looks wonderful. However his "fan subtitles" are a bit off sometimes and also the film suffers from audio drop outs every now and again(it wont ruin the experience though).
Also the dialogue on the subtitles is usually off, especially with the character El Diablo. He is a very funny character but if you dont know italian to well and have to read the subtitles he loses his humor because of the translation problems.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on May 16, 2006, 12:40:25 PM


The towns center of action is the fancy saloon/brothel run by Sheba (Sylvie Fennec)


the whore house is not run by Sheba. Sheba is the girl whom Hud befriends after he kills her father.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on May 19, 2006, 11:51:45 PM
spoiler!!!!!!!!

Watching it again last night I realized at the end when Hud chases away the kids with his empty gun that he takes the sheriff's advice from earlier and uses his head rather than resorting to violence. :)
Can this be a reference to "hippie" philosophy in the film?
   


spoiler end!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I must say this is slowly creeping up to be in my top twenty list :)

it grows on you.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on May 21, 2006, 05:05:10 AM
Quote
I must say this is slowly creeping up to be in my top twenty list


Never for me, lol, at least Leone in AFOD showed Eastwood have a reaction to being hit by bullets, Hud barely flinches, its fantasy land.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on May 21, 2006, 12:13:49 PM


Never for me, lol, at least Leone in AFOD showed Eastwood have a reaction to being hit by bullets, Hud barely flinches, its fantasy land.


I thought that was cool :(


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: Banjo on June 18, 2006, 06:04:34 AM
I just got through the second half of this movie having watched the first part one late evening last week(i'm afraid the Football World Cups been taking precedence over everything just recently).I'm gonna have to watch the whole thing through again but on first impression i veer a bit more towards Firecrackers opinion than CJ.
Despite the flaws i love the stunning look of the movie,the characters(the hippys were ludicrous but fun) ,the storyline and i didn't have a problem with Huds bullet proof chainmail-well they have similar vests nowadays!Though not Morricone i thought the music provided an excellent accompaniment to the movie which definately has a similar feel and atmosphere to the Great Silence as well as the snowy(well thawed out) appearance of the Alps.The ending also reminds me of Silence in that the townsfolk are all bundled out together at the point of being slaughtered-and the romantic fool of a badly wounded hero walks out to confront the bad guys.
However i did have a problem with the lack of a proper gun duel in the ending-after the hippies had fully unloaded their ammo on Huds chainmail they scarper and Hud rides off into the sunset-very unsatifactory!
The Specialist is not as good as Django,Silence,The revolution trilogy but i enjoyed it more than the earlier non-Django Corbucci-i'd give it at least an 80% rating-highly recommended and essential for sw and Corbucci fanatics.
   


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on June 18, 2006, 10:31:33 AM

However i did have a problem with the lack of a proper gun duel in the ending-after the hippies had fully unloaded their ammo on Huds chainmail they scarper and Hud rides off into the sunset-very unsatifactory!

   

SPOILER

I felt the same. but that ending grows on you. After a second view you see its brilliance. remember he didnt have any bullets. He used his head instead of his gun like the sheriff(when drunk) advised him to do.
I think this whole feature grows on you in time. right now it is on my top 30. next week it could be closer to top 20. what did you think of the gunfight with Diablo's gang? hardly "satisfactory".

Banjo I also think you should announce that your post contains spoilers.



Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: Banjo on June 19, 2006, 05:22:51 PM

I think this whole feature grows on you in time. right now it is on my top 30. next week it could be closer to top 20.
I agree-its a very worthy end to Corbucci's "mud 'n' blood" trilogy-the oddness makes it unique and Corbuccis class shines through unlike that other oddity Django Kill-well at least the British piss artist dubbers(according to Alex Cox ;D ) had the sense to try and improve that sham of a movie.
From the stills i didn't think i'd like Johnny Halliday as the Great Hud but to the contrary i was very impressed-much cooler than the Silence character i reckon.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on June 19, 2006, 07:30:39 PM

From the stills i didn't think i'd like Johnny Halliday as the Great Hud but to the contrary i was very impressed-much cooler than the Silence character i reckon.

yeah I have no problem with Halliday at all. He is cool. I wish he would have done more spags.

He's a bit scrawny dont you think?


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: Banjo on June 20, 2006, 04:05:29 AM
Yeah how'd he manage the weight of that chainmail all the time? ;D


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: titoli on September 18, 2006, 01:03:55 PM
I agree with CJ's review (it seems that we agree too much lately, don't we?). I would like to point at some things. The original title is in the plural: so I expected some stuff like the Professionists or the Wild Bunch. I think the title was put there as a decoy. The english-language  distributor was more honest, though the title he chose still leaves much to be desired.
Angela Luce is the brothel mama.
Johnny Hallyday was a good choice: he could have done better than Trintignant in Silence.
Moschin is perfect: he dubbed himself in the original and that adds to his character. The only problem is that he doesn't look like an american sheriff: too round a face: I think that a black wig and moustaches could have done the trick.
I didn't see so much nudity: a fault of my italian version ? (I'll check the french one, in case).
And all that zombie-like resurrection of the hero (doubled by Adorf's) is really unacceptable. Still the movie lets itself be watched, though I don't think it ranks with Corbucci's best. And though here CJ might disagree with me, I think even Django is better.





Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on September 18, 2006, 05:30:15 PM

And all that zombie-like resurrection of the hero

don't mean to offend, but the what?
Do you mean when he goes outside to greet the hippie kids who have acquired firearms?


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: titoli on September 18, 2006, 05:49:42 PM
Where's the offence? Anyway, I mean that he gives the impression to be half dead already before shooting Adorf, who also is miraculolusly resurrected (BTW, I can't understand all his bs before giving the chance to be killed  to Hallyday whom one (me, at least) expects to pronounce the  Tuco bathtub line. He hadn't given before the impression he was a sportsman). And then he's just a hair this side of death before challenging the hippies.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on September 18, 2006, 05:56:44 PM
Anyway, I mean that he gives the impression to be half dead already before shooting Adorf, who also is miraculolusly resurrected (BTW, I can't understand all his bs before giving the chance to be killed  to Hallyday whom one (me, at least) expects to pronounce the  Tuco bathtub line. He hadn't given before the impression he was a sportsman). And then he's just a hair this side of death before challenging the hippies.


I never really got the impression he was slowly dying. I felt that he was just limping from the knee wound. When he sits down to open the safe he just lies down to rest his knee.
Then again when burning the money he does collapse.

I guess I didn't see much of a problem with it.

when he faces the hippies he has already been "fixed up" by the Hooker and Sheba.
He uses his brain against the hippies. Who was it that said to him he should use his brain over his gun?
Well...all that matters is that he takes the advice.


As for Adorf all of the sudden being honorable in the gunfight... I guess he always wanted to be fair when facing Haliday. He makes many references in the film about wanting to "shoot it out" with him.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: titoli on September 18, 2006, 06:07:28 PM
Sheba went desperately looking for a doctor. She didn't and couldn't fix anything.
About Adorf wanting to shoot it out with Hallyday, that makes all the more incomprehensible his bs and his distraction which allows H. to shoot him. 


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on September 18, 2006, 06:10:07 PM
Sheba went desperately looking for a doctor. She didn't and couldn't fix anything.

My  mistake. Forgot. haven't seen it in a few months. But the hooker knew how to fix him with the aid of the afro lady.

Adorf tried to pull a fast one when speaking to his personal note taker and pull his gun out. Halliday got wise to this and killed him.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on September 18, 2006, 06:11:33 PM

I didn't see so much nudity: a fault of my italian version ?





No but it's more nudity then Corbucci has shown in his westerns.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: titoli on September 18, 2006, 06:20:58 PM
I didn't see any pair of nude female buttocks like those shown in the Mercenary. Or (small) boobs like those in Silence.

I didn't see Adorf pull any fast one: he just lets Hallyday kill him. I'll rewatch the scene though. But keep in mind that Adorf was the one we saw a few minutes earlier shoot cold-bloodedly right between the eyes Moschin, who didn't have any gun.   


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on September 18, 2006, 06:30:28 PM


I didn't see Adorf pull any fast one:

He does. He tells his writer boy to write down what he says (escribe escribe) then grabs his gun without turning to face Hallyday.

As for the nudity there is far more then any other Corbucci film (haven't seen "White, yellow and black").

Apache (the girl hippie) reveals her breast from under her rags during the doobie scene,  then you have the reflection of Fabian's completly nude body (backside) passing by a mirror before getting into a tub. Then in the tub you can see her breast over the water.
That's more then Vonetta Mcgee's quick boob flash in TGS. I dont't even recall two female butts in "The Mercenary".
"Companeros" has a bit of nudity in the beginning.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: titoli on September 18, 2006, 06:58:54 PM
Quote
He does. He tells his writer boy to write down what he says (escribe escribe) then grabs his gun without turning to face Hallyday.

I don't call that a fast one, but a dumb one, as Hallyday's been waiting for it all the time, exactly like any experienced viewer is waiting for too. Actually he gives Hallyday the advantage of having him always in his line of vision while he has to do a half turn and aim before shooting.

Quote
Apache (the girl hippie) reveals her breast from under her rags during the doobie scene,


Didn't notice. I'll rewatch it. Not that I care, though.

Quote
then you have the reflection of Fabian's completly nude body (backside) passing by a mirror before getting into a tub.

Listen, I've been waiting to see Fabian's nude body not only in this movie and never made it (though I haven't been through her whole filmography). In the bathtub scene she passes in front of the mirror but I only saw her naked back, not the buttocks. Her right nipple is maybe half visible before she dies; and in the bathtub scene I didn't notice any naked breast:if it's there it is subliminal. On the contrary, in GS the breast are prolongedly exposed (but as I don't like the actress I couldn't care less). IN The Mercenary a beautiful pair of buttocks are kept visible for a long time, giving Nero the pretext to make a speech. There's nothing like that here. I don't remember the nudes in Companeros, though they might have been there.   










Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on September 18, 2006, 07:03:23 PM


Listen, I've been waiting to see Fabian's nude body not only in this movie and never made it (though I haven't been through her whole filmography). In the bathtub scene she passes in front of the mirror but I only saw her naked back, not the buttocks. Her right nipple is maybe half visible before she dies; and in the bathtub scene I didn't notice any naked breast:if it's there it is subliminal.  











I honestly don't know what version you saw then. You must have seen a cropped version.
I can see her nipples just rising above the bathtub water (not to mention her butt in the mirror).

If you like...I can send you a copy of my copy so you don't miss out.

I honestly didn't find her that attractive to be honest. I would have rather seen Sheba nude.

The nudity in Companeros is very quick. Milian exposes the female revolutionary's breast in the very frist 10 minutes of the film.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: titoli on September 18, 2006, 07:11:28 PM
Quote
I would have rather seen Sheba nude.

On that I agree: she's beautiful. But also Angela Luce boobs, to me, would have had their share of interest. As to Fabian, she not pretty but very sexy.
Anyway I'll check the french version.   


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on September 18, 2006, 07:15:15 PM

Anyway I'll check the french version.   
I believe that is the version I have.
I traded with shobary a bit ago and got the "djangokill" fan made version. It's widescreen and the language switches from French to Italian throughout the film. You should probably acquire that version as the boobs are intaked.

Or you could wait for the english language version xploitedcinema will be getting soon.

CJ and I have the same copy, he can vouch for me.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on September 18, 2006, 07:30:24 PM
Yes Fabian nude in mirror and in tub as per Firecracker's description. Also Hippy girl flashes.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: titoli on September 19, 2006, 02:21:25 AM
Quote
CJ and I have the same copy, he can vouch for me.

I believe you even without his word. We're not at a trial. And the various versions of the same movie are common fare. Anyway, when I get time, I'll rewatch both the italian version and the french.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on September 19, 2006, 09:07:19 AM
I believe you even without his word.


I'm flattered :)


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: pixelated on January 11, 2007, 07:59:57 PM
can anyone tell me about the releases for this one?

xploited cinema's site only has one release, and it says it is french only audio.. it doesn't state anything about subtitles.. on sundances.net it shows a release has japanese subtitles, but not english..

so what release should i be looking for and where can i find it? really wanting to see this one


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on January 12, 2007, 04:29:36 AM
I barely remember somebody mentioning a possible South African release that will have English, if that helps.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on April 27, 2007, 03:17:07 AM


The character Hud looks cool he got a chain mail vest that must be made out of "mithril" from Lord Of The Rings, it does make sence to wear during his knife fights , but its a bit ridiculous to ask us to believe it will repell bullets.


from the SWWB:


in regards to the chain-maille vest---those actually did exist and were used by some law enforcement folks in the period after the Civil War. However, they were cumbersome and heavy. That was why they ceased using them, moreso than their inability to stop bullets.
Also, keep in mind we aren't talking about modern day firepower here. It really doesn't take much to stop a .44 or .45 slug fired from a period-authentic pistol (especially if that firearm is discharged at a distance of more than 10 or 12 feet away from its target). Shotguns and rifles are another story altogether, though.

Oh, and it wasn't exactly firearms that propigated the kiss goodbye to armoured warriors. It was the awkwardness and bulk of the armour (same reason the AZ rangers and pinkertons stopped using armour). Leaders of various armies found it was better for their men to be "light-weight" and therefore easier and faster to deploy. It became apparent to many of the Knights you speak of that these barbarians without armour were out-maneuvering them on the battlefields thanks to their armour.

But, then again...we have Ramon piercing that suit of armour in FISTFUL OF DOLLARS.....
But, he is doing so with rifle.
If you will notice, when Eastwood fires at the same suit, he shoots at the threaded portion below which losens the bonds holding the armoured skirting--he doesn't even try to shoot through the armour.



Hope this makes the chain mail Haliday wears less of a bother for you Joe :)


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: Banjo on April 27, 2007, 04:12:03 PM
Whats this ,CJ not doing his homework properly? ;D


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on April 27, 2007, 04:50:05 PM
actually I'd ask you to wear it to prove it defleted bullets.  It still looks like BS O0

A quick search brings up silk as the first use.

http://inventors.about.com/od/bstartinventions/a/Body_Armor.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulletproof_vest

http://www.tech-faq.com/inventor-of-the-bullet-proof-vest.shtml


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: Banjo on April 27, 2007, 05:00:07 PM
In all honesty i have grave doubts that chain mail would deflect bullets especially after seeing an episode of Mythbusters where they proved that not only wouldn't the cliched metal cigar box prevent the penetration of a bullet but neither would a complete automobile.

Also i learned in school history lessons that the simple reason that armour plate and chain mail died out after medieval times was down to the advent of gunpowder.



Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on April 27, 2007, 05:24:47 PM
But on Mythbusters weren't they using modern powder loads?


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on April 27, 2007, 05:55:42 PM
But on Mythbusters weren't they using modern powder loads?


exactly. Bullets during the time the film takes place were rather easy to deflect.


And besides I don't see how this has any baring of the movie being crap (which it isn't). It's a fantasy film and has fantasy elements.
FOD has that scene with Joe wearing a plate of iron that can deflect rifle shots at very close range. I don't hear any complaints about this.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on April 27, 2007, 07:58:11 PM
Quote
FOD has that scene with Joe wearing a plate of iron that can deflect rifle shots at very close range. I don't hear any complaints about this.

No complaints because its about a 1/4 inch or more thick, which makes a difference.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on April 27, 2007, 08:28:15 PM
No complaints because its about a 1/4 inch or more thick, which makes a difference.


but it's a long range weapon that, at one point, is used at very close range.


Wouldn't that make a difference?


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on April 28, 2007, 10:50:44 AM
I don't think it would make too much of a difference, I'd rather be behind plate iron than chain male.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: Banjo on April 29, 2007, 05:30:32 AM
But on Mythbusters weren't they using modern powder loads?
Haven't seen it in awhile so I'm not sure.

I think they were trying to debunk the metal cigar box or medallion shield cliche which are normally in the domain of westerns but i recall them using all sorts of ammo  and every time the bullet got through.

Anyway i agree with what FC says about The Specialists being a fantasy film with its fantasy elements,and The Specialists is a very good movie.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on May 25, 2007, 08:57:45 PM
This has a few reviews elsewhere on the board but if we want to be the largest spaghetti western information bank on the web (which we are already slowly achieving) we need to keep everything about one particular film on one thread.


Also this excellent SW needs to be seen by everybody. It's a flawed masterpeice by Corbucci.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: Banjo on May 26, 2007, 04:12:00 AM
Well all multi-threads for sw's have already been merged (hopefully) but  i'll keep an eye out for any rogue Specialist reviews that may be hiding somewhere.   ;)



Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: Arizona Colt on October 08, 2007, 06:57:11 PM
THE SPECIALIST 1969 aka GLI SPECIALISTI

Johnny Halliday (Hud), Mario Adorf (El Diablo), Sylvie Fennec (Sheba), Gaston Moshin (Sheriff), Gino Pernice (Romero)

Directed by Sergio Corbucci; Music by Angelo Lavagnino

*****POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD*****


I HAD TO BREAK MY REVIEW UP INTO TWO POSTS AS THE POST COUNT WILL NOT ALLOW ME TO POST THE ENTIRE REVIEW. I POSTED THIS ON ANOTHER SITE AND AT THE BEHEST OF BANJO, I'M POSTING IT HERE AS WELL...

Hud (Halliday), a famous gunman across the US has returned to Blackstone to learn what led to his brother's hanging. A woman named Virginia Pollywood had her bank robbed of all its money and the guilty party was thought to have been Charlie, Hud's brother. Now, the townspeople believe that Hud has come back not just for revenge, but also to recover the stolen bank money. The sheriff (Moshin) requires that no one in Blackstone can carry a gun but problems still arise as assassins try to snipe Hud upon his arrival as well as townsfolk attempting to take his life inside the saloon. Hud goes in search of a bandit named El Diablo (Adorf), a friend from Hud's past who may have some information on Charlie's death. The sheriff pursues Hud keeping a close eye on him until the truth and Charlie's killer is revealed.

I've never seen the actor Halliday before and he reminds me of a very skinny Franco Nero. He is quite intimidating in the gun action sequences and he seldom shows any real emotion other than when anyone mentions his brother you can almost sense in the way he turns his head, he is saddened at the mention of it. He is satisfactory enough and as I said, he's an imposing figure in his long trenchcoat and his actions in the numerous gun battles. Many times however, he comes off as little more than a hoodlum but in light of the way the townsfolk gossip and plot his death or arrest, this is warranted. His treatment of the people in the town reminds me of Eastwood in HIGH PLAINS DRIFTER (1973). It's subtle but the Eastwood film came to mind instantly.

Adorf AGAIN steals the movie away from everyone else even Halliday when both are on the screen at the same time. Adorf seems to always put everything into his roles and here he plays the one-armed nutty Mexican bandit leader El Diablo who grew up with Hud. Diablo has a spur implanted into his stump where his arm used to be and he has his personal secretary of sorts in a little boy named Chico. Every time Diablo has an epiphany or a sudden intuitive idea, he says, "Chico, write this down...On this day..." It's hilarious and it comes to a head during the final moments when he finally confronts Hud after all the secrets are made public. Diablo tells Chico to write down that at that moment he and Hud will now trade bullets with their left hands and he, El Diablo, is the fastest gun. It's not difficult to guess how it turns out but Diablo's final note to Chico is blackly comical in itself.

Moshin again impresses as the good natured sheriff whom you are led to believe (for awhile anyway) that he has something to do with Charlie's execution. He is a strictly by-the-book lawman similar to Frank Wolff's interpretation of the sheriff in Corbucci's major classic THE GREAT SILENCE (1968). He is somewhat bewitched by Virginia Pollywood who fancies herself a seducer of men. You get the impression early on that she is involved much more than is unveiled at the time. Moshin wants to believe that Hud's brother was innocent and at one point in the film you do think that his brother did in fact steal the townspeople's finances. The scenes with Moshin and Halliday are quite good especially their first meeting leading up to their arrival in the town and their uneasy "relationship" when Hud takes off to meet up with El Diablo where things take a turn for the worse for the sheriff.

Corbucci obviously had an eye for action and was far better at it then the more famous (in America anyways) Sergio Leone. All the action scenes are very well handled with special mention of the opening and the big burst of violence towards the end sure to grab the attention of anyone suffering from ADD. He also had a penchant for having characters with deformities or maiming his heroes in some way. In DJANGO, the informer has his ear cut off before being forced to eat it, and Django having his hands crushed underfoot by horses. In GREAT SILENCE, Silence has had his throat cut in a flashback to his childhood not to mention his love of shooting his enemies thumbs off. Also, a Mexican baddie has his face buried in hot coals and the hero again has his hands mutilated. Here, Hud is shot several times and has a pitchfork ran through his leg. Also, Diablo is missing an arm. An arm which he details how he lost as well as offering up what he did to gringo's captured by him and he didn't stop at arms and legs. This maiming of the body could be seen as a more violent and visceral response to Leone and his method of populating his films with characters whom you never get to know but you remember their faces. You never hear them speak but they have such memorable visages that stand out.

In a scene typical of Corbucci, Hud is shot in the back late in the film. In the scene, he has figured out the location of the cash box and just as he is about to open it, the sheriff shows up having survived his contest with the one armed bandit, El Diablo. Once the Sheriff opens the box, Hud sees something that grabs his attention. He steps towards the Sheriff prompting the deputy to shoot him. However, Hud is wearing a chain mail vest which saves him. Once the sheriff returns to the town, the townsfolk, like animals, demand their money returned leading to further trouble for the sheriff when a couple of twists are revealed late in the film. In keeping with Corbucci's insistence to keep his heroes vulnerable all the while maintaining a facade of invincibility, Hud does not escape the film unscathed and an alternate ending reveals that Hud does indeed die in another version.

Also of note is the aforementioned violent and sudden climax when all is revealed. Again, like Corbucci's DJANGO (1966) and THE GREAT SILENCE (1968), a woman is yet again at the center of the film. Here, it's not known exactly the length of said female's involvement until the final 15 minutes but Corbucci slaps you in the face with a rapid fire scene of violence that alternately ties up loose ends and lays waste to the bulk of the cast members. After learning what led to his brother's demise and the towns total lack of concern for him, Hud burns their money in front of them infuriating them further. The band of hippies who have been watching the action on the sidelines through most of the film decide now is the time to take advantage of the situation and Hud in his weakened state especially after he has shunned them on several occasions earlier in the film.They call out the injured Hud in an effort to kill him. In fact, the hippies had thought of him as an invincible gunslinger. Only when he is brought into town layed out on a wagon do they see that he is human after all. If they had not seen this, it is doubtful they would have gotten the courage to call him out during the final moments. With no bullets, Hud goes out to meet them. Their inability to accurately hit him shows their greenhorn skills with the gun. The bullets that do hit their mark bounce off his bullet proof vest. The group of vagrants then run away. Hud also leaves the town having satisfied his search for his brother's killer and eventual murder.

CONTINUED BELOW...


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: Arizona Colt on October 08, 2007, 06:57:45 PM
CONTINUED...

Speaking of the hippies, I'm not sure what exactly their reason for being in the film is unless Corbucci was trying to make a statement about the Hippy movement of the time and their "war" against the establishment and government. Here, when the law is summarily eradicated, the put upon outcasts take it upon themselves to take control and start their own "law" so to speak. They force the uncaring and callous townsfolk to strip off their clothes in an attempt to humiliate them as they had been humiliated throughout the movie. There is also a scene in which the group of gypsies try and force a young girl into smoking what appears to be a marijuana cigarette before Hud shows up and runs them off.

Maybe this was Corbucci's way of visualizing his thoughts on these kinds of people. People who more or less were vagabonds living off of what others gave them not so much because they couldn't make a living for themselves but because they didn't want to. Maybe Corbucci wasn't trying to say anything at all. Maybe he just threw these few characters in to add a quirky element representative of his other films with offbeat characters and situations.

Corbucci also lends this film an air of dread although not quite as much a gothic horror atmosphere as his GREAT SILENCE (1968), but a fairly melancholic feel which permeates the film and also through the many characters. The only really sympathetic one is Sheba, the young girl Hud befriends. The film also feels like a continuation of themes Corbucci explored previously in his MUD TRILOGY as I like to call it, DJANGO (1966), THE GREAT SILENCE (1968) and this film. All three are fairly downbeat affairs filled with vengeful, self-centered or callous individuals and some sadistic villains. The locations in THE SPECIALIST also impress. Apparently shot in the Alps, Corbucci takes full advantage of the surroundings and these only enhance the film. There seems to be a constant stream of fog in the background over the mountaintops replete with snow and several somewhat eerie graveyard scenes add to the bleak atmosphere.

This DVD was apparently a fansub of the French disc. There are several times where the film switches to French so I assume these bits weren't in the Italian original. There is also at least two bits where there is no dialog at all. Lips are moving but no sound is heard. The only problem is that often the subs either appear too late or too soon but then it's great to have this film subbed at all as I've never heard of an English version of this released anywhere.

Another awesome Corbucci movie, another quirky Corbucci movie that is highly enjoyable with possible subtext from the man and I'm further convinced that Corbucci was as good if not better than Leone as he made just as many great films as the forever praised Leone did and it's a shame, a real shame that Corbucci will remain an unknown and unappreciated director in America as with such films as HELLBENDERS (1966), THE GREAT SILENCE (1968), THE MERCENERY (1968) COMPANEROS (1970) and the genre defining DJANGO (1966; which was probably just as responsible for the propulsion and continuation of the spaghetti western movies as FISTFUL OF DOLLARS was) were true classics. Even films like JOHNNY ORO (1966) and NAVAJO JOE (1966) are testaments of Corbucci's skill at putting on a feast of shockingly violent displays of mindless action that provide what movies are supposed to do in the first place-be entertaining.


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: Novecento on November 10, 2017, 11:18:11 AM
A behind-the-scenes short with interviews (you can even hear Corbucci speaking French):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yay1wp773ks&ab_channel=LaurentGosselin


Title: Re: Gli specialisti aka The Specialist/Specialists (1969)
Post by: mike siegel on November 10, 2017, 03:51:25 PM
Plus de tournage de Corbucci! Merci bien!

Also a pain: Now I have about one hour of behind the the scenes footage
on Corbucci films 1968-1972, but only ONE minute on Leone. A pain :).