Sergio Leone Web Board

Films of Sergio Leone => Duck, You Sucker => Topic started by: BeauButabi on June 20, 2006, 01:22:00 PM



Title: Historical question...
Post by: BeauButabi on June 20, 2006, 01:22:00 PM
Just wondering, what did the Germans have to do with the Mexican revolution? I've been doing some googling and I nothing I found about the Mexican revolution mentions Germany. I though it might have something to do with WWI. Anyone who knows the history better care to educate me a bit?


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Groggy on June 20, 2006, 05:31:23 PM
There have been a few other topics on this question, but to briefly answer it:

The Germans were engaged in extensive arms trades with the Huerta government in 1913, sending them rifles, machine guns, military advisors, and armored cars.  That was the main concern of the US over Mexico - that Germany would establish a sphere of influence there.  Notice the Zimmerman Telegraph, wherein Germany promised Mexico the Southwestern US if they joined the war on the side of the central powers.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Sackett on June 23, 2006, 06:27:26 PM
Absolutely.
Just finished watching Wind and the Lion again.  The Germans were in Morocco trying to establish a presence there in the early 1900s.  Comments from others about that film were suggesting that Germany was actually trying to instigate WW1.  Maybe so.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Groggy on June 24, 2006, 07:38:13 AM
Britain, France and Germany very nearly went to war over Morocco in 1905.  That probably would've been better, since the likelihood of Russia etc. jumping in would've been decreased.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Man with no dame on June 15, 2007, 07:19:17 AM
Actually , the Germns established a "sphere of influence" thru out Central and South America, which worked to their benefit after World War II.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Groggy on June 15, 2007, 07:39:52 AM
Germany, predictably given the history of their imperial endeavours, was very heavy-handed in their attempts to get involved in Latin American politics, so they didn't get a huge amount of influence. That's not to say they didn't try, but only Mexico and Argentina ever really supported the Germans (and Mexico only in WWI). The Germans tried to set up colonies in Venezuela and the Dominican Republic in the early 1900s but Teddy Roosevelt swatted them down with his big stick. During WWI they were engaged in all kinds of subterfuge and political manuveuring in Central and South America, with very limited results.


For any really interested, here's an article about Latin American involvement in WWI, which does a pretty good job of describing Germany's attempts to gain support in the region:

http://www.worldwar1.com/sfla.htm (http://www.worldwar1.com/sfla.htm)


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Man with no dame on June 15, 2007, 03:41:16 PM
Germany, predictably given the history of their imperial endeavours, was very heavy-handed in their attempts to get involved in Latin American politics, so they didn't get a huge amount of influence. That's not to say they didn't try, but only Mexico and Argentina ever really supported the Germans (and Mexico only in WWI). The Germans tried to set up colonies in Venezuela and the Dominican Republic in the early 1900s but Teddy Roosevelt swatted them down with his big stick. During WWI they were engaged in all kinds of subterfuge and political manuveuring in Central and South America, with very limited results.


For any really interested, here's an article about Latin American involvement in WWI, which does a pretty good job of describing Germany's attempts to gain support in the region:

http://www.worldwar1.com/sfla.htm (http://www.worldwar1.com/sfla.htm)
Interesting read! O0 There are quite a few German pocket communities scattered all over South America, according to friends I have from there.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Groggy on June 15, 2007, 04:12:11 PM
Interesting read! O0 There are quite a few German pocket communities scattered all over South America, according to friends I have from there.

Brazil has a pretty large German community, IIRC.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Man with no dame on June 15, 2007, 04:20:03 PM
Argetina, Venezuela and Peru also. Peru is rather a hornet's nest of all sorts of baddies. Not a good place to vacation.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Groggy on June 15, 2007, 04:24:54 PM
I can buy that. Though to be honest I'm kinda confused how so many Germans ended up in South America?  :-\

Then again, Brazil also has a large population of descendants of ex-Confederate soldiers/politicians, too.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Juan Miranda on June 15, 2007, 04:34:02 PM
I can buy that. Though to be honest I'm kinda confused how so many Germans ended up in South America?  :-\

Then again, Brazil also has a large population of descendants of ex-Confederate soldiers/politicians, too.

Hmm. Seems that Nazis through the ages have enjoyed the beach life. BOYS FROM BRAZIL, now there's a very silly film.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Man with no dame on June 15, 2007, 04:43:07 PM
I can buy that. Though to be honest I'm kinda confused how so many Germans ended up in South America?  :-\

Then again, Brazil also has a large population of descendants of ex-Confederate soldiers/politicians, too.
People of German heritage are the largest of all ancestries here in the states, followed by Irish. I'm sure that with the loot some of those Nazi's spirited out, they could pick and choose their destinations, but opted for places that would be hard to extract them from. The Mosad wont even go to Peru.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Groggy on June 15, 2007, 05:16:38 PM
People of German heritage are the largest of all ancestries here in the states, followed by Irish. I'm sure that with the loot some of those Nazi's spirited out, they could pick and choose their destinations, but opted for places that would be hard to extract them from. The Mosad wont even go to Peru.

That's a partial explanation, but a lot of these communities in South America have been around for 100+ years.


Title: Re: Historical question...
Post by: Man with no dame on June 15, 2007, 05:39:14 PM
That's a partial explanation, but a lot of these communities in South America have been around for 100+ years.
All the more fortuitous for the Nazis.