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Other/Miscellaneous => Off-Topic Discussion => Topic started by: The Peacemaker on July 30, 2006, 02:35:51 PM



Title: The Train (1964)
Post by: The Peacemaker on July 30, 2006, 02:35:51 PM
I've seen this movie even when I was a kid but I saw it again last night and it really is a great film. Burt Lancaster is so cool as Labiche, the French Resistance member trying to stop the art train bound for Germany. All the explosions and train wrecks are real, none of this CGI crap! It even has SW veteran Donald O' Brien as a Nazi Sargeant.

If you haven't seen this film, you're missing out on one of the greatest action films of all time.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: boardwalk_angel on July 30, 2006, 02:43:43 PM
Yes...one fine movie... 8)


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Juan Miranda on July 30, 2006, 05:59:53 PM
Farnkenheimer's career was certianly an odd one. At one point he seemed to be the major dissident voice in Hollywood, making extremely Expressionist looking movies with an ultra-sour outlook on the American way of life, yet doing so in big budget prductions with big star names.

THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE, BIRD MAN OF ALCATRAZ, SEVEN DAYS IN MAY and (especially) SECONDS are incredible films. SECONDS, made following THE TRAIN is an unclassifyable oddity, an experimental art film starring (of all people) Rock Hudson. It's ending is on a par with LA DOLCE VITA, in the way images and sound convay a meaning reaching beyond the limits of languge, in a similar coastal setting.

THE TRAIN is indeed a fabulous action picture, with it's undoubted highlight the huge set piece arial boming scene of the rail-yard, with much of the action captured in a single, spectacular long take. The film's bleak ending, with it's seeming futility was so typical of Frankenheimer at that time.

Then he made the massivly budgeted GRAND PRIX, and his films seemed to go all to hell. It was such a flop he struggled to recover artistically, with the small film triumph of THE GYPSY MOTHS (possibly Burt Lancaster's finest performance, SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS excepted) and a credible sequil in THE FRENCH CONNECTION II.

Apart from that, a long string of anonimous failures which any hack could have turned out. Good he suddnly found his form again on RONIN, one of his last ever movies, but it'll be for his extraordinary work in the 1960's that he'll always be remembered.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: The Peacemaker on July 30, 2006, 06:06:18 PM
Farnkenheimer's career was certianly an odd one. At one point he seemed to be the major dissident voice in Hollywood, making extremely Expressionist looking movies with an ultra-sour outlook on the American way of life, yet doing so in big budget prductions with big star names.

THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE, BIRD MAN OF ALCATRAZ, SEVEN DAYS IN MAY and (especially) SECONDS are incredible films. SECONDS, made following THE TRAIN is an unclassifyable oddity, an experimental art film starring (of all people) Rock Hudson. It's ending is on a par with LA DOLCE VITA, in the way images and sound convay a meaning reaching beyond the limits of languge, in a similar coastal setting.

THE TRAIN is indeed a fabulous action picture, with it's undoubted highlight the huge set piece arial boming scene of the rail-yard, with much of the action captured in a single, spectacular long take. The film's bleak ending, with it's seeming futility was so typical of Frankenheimer at that time.

Then he made the massivly budgeted GRAND PRIX, and his films seemed to go all to hell. It was such a flop he struggled to recover artistically, with the small film triumph of THE GYPSY MOTHS (possibly Burt Lancaster's finest performance, SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS excepted) and a credible sequil in THE FRENCH CONNECTION II.

Apart from that, a long string of anonimous failures which any hack could have turned out. Good he suddnly found his form again on RONIN, one of his last ever movies, but it'll be for his extraordinary work in the 1960's that he'll always be remembered.

The Train was an artistic movie, but Rock Hudson wasn't in it. That was Burt Lancaster!


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Juan Miranda on July 30, 2006, 06:36:55 PM
As I said, SECONDS, (made after THE TRAIN) stars Rock Hudson. A few typo's sure, but I thought my grammer was pretty sound.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060955/


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: cigar joe on July 30, 2006, 09:35:22 PM
Yes a great film, especially for railroad buffs, and one of Frankenheimers best. Saw it at Loews Triboro in Astoria Queens on the big screen.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 31, 2006, 08:18:37 AM
Lancaster is nobody's idea of a Frenchman, but setting that aside, The Train is a remarkable action film. Since Lancaster did his own stunts, and the special effects are all practical ones, the action has an authenticity rarely seen in films. Friedkin learned everything from Frankenheimer.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: titoli on July 31, 2006, 09:03:01 AM
SECONDS is one of those movies one wonders whether he is the only one to appreciate. Then one discovers that they are just vanished, for no apparent reason. In Italy it passed just once on the public channel about 15 years ago and never had the chance to watch it again. I remember though that after a brilliant start the movie dragged a little bit in the middle part.
About Ronin, I don't think it can compare with Frankenheimer's best.




Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 31, 2006, 09:27:55 AM
I hate, hate, hate Ronin.

Seconds I like, except for the ending. Okay, so it's frightening, but it leaves a lot of questions unanswered, especially: why does Seconds Inc. do what it does? Where does the money come from? Before Rock Hudson went all un-cooperative, what did they expect to get out of him?

A puzzled viewer is not a satisfied viewer!


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Tim on July 31, 2006, 11:55:09 AM
Quote
I hate, hate, hate Ronin.

  Any reason?  Cause I'm getting the feeling you didn't like it too much.  Just a guess though.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Juan Miranda on July 31, 2006, 05:40:11 PM
I'm not especially a "fan" of RONIN either, I was just glad to see, on the only occasion I've watched it, that Frankenheimer had regained some of the power he once commanded so effortlessly. Starring Rock Hudson Bay Company and Burk Lanchaster Bomber of course.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Noodles_SlowStir on April 26, 2008, 05:00:35 PM
I've seen The Train a couple of times, but I didn't know too much about the production itself.  I didn't realize that John Frankenheimer was a replacement director.  Arthur Penn was the original director of the film and actually shot one day.  Lancaster didn't like his vision of the film and replaced him with Frankenheimer.  Lancaster had worked with Frankenheimer before on The Young Savages and Birdman Of Alcatraz.  Besides having some kind of comfort level, Lancaster felt that he could have greater control over the production with Frankenheimer at the helm.   

Maybe some were already aware of that.  I found some comments by Penn in a recent newspaper interview.  When I was looking at the site for the Museum Of Modern Art for OUATITW information, I noticed they had another film exhibition series on films that have notable jazz scores.  One of the films featured is Mickey One (1965) by Arthur Penn.  I think that film has already been shown.  In the New York Sun, they had an article that included a recent phone interview with Penn.  He talks a little about the undertaking of Mickey One and how it was a rebound project for him.  Apparently, he was quite upset with having been replaced as director on another film.  Sounds like it's still a sore spot for him. 

Quote
The film was very much a reaction to its times, Mr. Penn said. "I was pissed off at the movie business. I had started to work on a film with Burt Lancaster, but it turned out he had made a secret deal with John Frankenheimer to take it over. Burt arrived and had me fired."

Eager to create something he could shove in Hollywood's face, Mr. Penn also was responding to the previous decade in American life. "The paranoia? Oh yeah. The heritage of the McCarthy era. He scared a whole generation."

It was pretty obvious the film was The Train.  The film definitely turned out great under the direction of Frankenheimer.  So good, it's amazing to think that it had suspended production and underwent a rewrite.

This is the link for the entire article if interested: 
http://www2.nysun.com/article/74781?page_no=1

This is what IMDb had:

Director Arthur Penn oversaw the development of the film and directed the first day of shooting. The next day was a holiday. Lancaster, dissatisfied with Penn's conception of the picture, had him fired and replaced by John Frankenheimer. Penn envisioned a more intimate film that would muse on the role art played in the French character, and why they would risk their lives to save the country's great art from the Nazis. He did not intend to give much focus to the mechanics of the train operation itself. Frankenheimer said that in the original script Penn wanted to shoot, the train did not leave the station until page 90. The production was shut down briefly while a the script was rewritten. Lancaster told screenwriter Walter Bernstein the day Penn was fired, "Frankenheimer is a bit of a whore, but he'll do what I want." What Lancaster wanted was more emphasis on action in order to ensure that the film was a hit after the failure of "The Leopard" by appealing to a broader audience.




 


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Juan Miranda on April 27, 2008, 06:13:46 AM
"Frankenheimer is a bit of a whore, but he'll do what I want."

Ouch! Thanks a producer talking alright.

Frankenhiemer's take on the subject, from the book THE CINEMA OF JOHN FRANKENHEIMER (Gerald Pratley).

"The Train was a film I had no intention of ever doing. There was another director on the film and he'd been shooting for two weeks and he left. I don't really know to this day exactly what happened. There was a conflict of personalities, a conflct over the type of film being made. I think the director, Arthur Penn, wanted to do one film, the producer and Lancaster wanted to do another. Penn has certainly proved he can make the type of film he wants to do with Bonnie and Clyde, so I think it was a difference of concept rather than anything else. Burt called me and asked if I would come over to France and direct it. I'd just finished Seven Days in May, I was quite tired. I didn't want to do it, yet he asked me to do it as a favour to him. And also, I wanted to go to Europe. On the way I read through the script. It was delivered to me just as I got on the plane. I thought it was almost appalling, neither fish nor fowl. The damned train didn't leave the station until page 140. When I arrived in Paris we shut down the production and re-wrote the script. I'd brought over Ned Young (he's dead now), and Howard Infell, and we re-wrote it."

He goes to reveal that shooting in the autumn proved impossible due to fog, freezing conditions and the leaves falling off all the trees (the film takes place in August). Incredibly the entire film was shut down again and shooting re-started in the spring next year for more re-writes and re-shoots. Frankenheimer took the opportunity for a long holiday tour of Europe with his wife, which he fondly recalled as "most revealing and enjoyable". He also remembered that seven movie cameras were demolished in accidents when shooting the train wrecks. He also laments that "Ideally, it should have been spoken in French with English subtitles, but you cannot do this with an expensive film made for the mass market."


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Noodles_SlowStir on April 27, 2008, 10:50:14 AM
Yes.  That was a harsh statement.  I like Burt Lancaster, but I guess he could be like that.  Not sure what the source was for that quote, it was from IMDb.
 
Thanks for the passage from the book giving Frankenheimer's perspective.  Although Frankenheimer was brought aboard by Lancaster in that way, no doubt he took the reins of the production.  Even though Lancaster may of felt he could exert influence on Frankenheimer, it's clear that Frankenheimer was certain of the direction he wanted to go in his treatment of the material.  Interesting about his thoughts on the language treatment as well.   

Just remarkable, despite the changes, numerous rewrites and stops in production, the difficulties in shooting with conditions....that the film came off so well.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: The Peacemaker on April 27, 2008, 02:13:26 PM
Not only did it come off well, but it was a huge box-office success.

I'm glad Frankenheimer took over production. It's a thrilling action film with a touch of art and class. Plus it was cool to see Lancaster operating the old French steamers.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Groggy on September 03, 2008, 12:12:33 AM
I wrote this IMDB comment awhile ago, but I thought I'd share since I rewatched the movie over the weekend. I would love to write a much longer, more in-depth essay about this film, if I had the time or resources to do so.

Quote
During the last days of Germany's occupation of France, German Colonel Von Waldheim (Paul Scofield) arranges for a collection of priceless art from a French museum to be shipped via train to Germany. The museum curator (Suzanne Flon) enlists a cell of French Resistance fighters, led by railroad inspector Paul Labiche (Burt Lancaster), to rescue the paintings "for the glory of France." Labiche refuses to waste lives saving paintings, but a complicated series of events results in Labiche commandeering the train anyway. However, Von Waldheim is obsessive about his cargo, and Labiche and his colleagues must go to extreme lengths to stop him.

The Train is a truly brilliant movie. As a rousing action film, it is among the best of its kind. It also works as a thoughtful mediation on the cost and meaning of warfare. Skillful direction by John Frankenheimer and two extremely talented leads cause both ends of the film to come off extremely well.

The movie is brutally honest in its examination of war. Labiche says early on that paintings aren't worth risking lives, and a comparison between the value of human life and the value - artistic and monetary - of the art is repeatedly raised. Dozens of lives - French and German - are lost during the mission, callously thrown away to preserve the paintings. Labiche doesn't understand why so many people must die for the sake of art - but that, in and of itself, is largely the film's message. At one point, Boule (Michel Simon), the cranky old engineer assigned to drive the train, justifies the mission by tying it to "the glory of France". It doesn't seem overly convincing to the audience, but then, is saving paintings representing France's national heritage any less of an abstract idea than patriotism itself? If nothing else, the paintings serve as a physical manifestation of national pride, and they are a viable object to fight for - something that can be touched. The brilliant climax, however, provides a stark and brutal answer to Labiche's dilemma; afterward, there can be no question what he values most.

First and foremost, however, the movie is an action film. On a technical level, it is brilliant. The film has an atmosphere of gritty realism which has rarely been surpassed by films of this type. The Train is filmed in crisp black-and-white, which adds immeasurably to the movie's stark, gritty feel. Labiche's heroics remain completely within the realm of the possible, and he wins more or less by luck. There are many impressively-staged sets, with steady dolly shots and pans around crowded rooms and station platforms. The movie's set-pieces are brilliantly staged, including the air raid on the train station, the massive train crash using three real locomotives, and the final confrontation between Labiche and Waldheim. Few war films are as realistic and believable as this, while remaining entertaining and exciting. Maurice Jarre contributes a subtle, effective score to the proceedings.

Burt Lancaster gives a truly exceptional performance as Labiche. An actor capable of over-acting on occasions, Lancaster restrains himself and gives a serious, thoughtful turn as the French Resistance fighter who is forced into a mission he doesn't believe in, who values the lives of his colleagues over abstract ideals and suicide missions. He performs his own stunts, and his physicality serves the role very well. Labiche is tough but not indestructible; but in the end, he is a man who will simply not be stopped, regardless of his personal feelings or the obstacles in his path.

Just as impressive is Lancaster's counterpart, the late, great Paul Scofield (A Man for All Seasons). His character is obsessed, but not insane. As a man who appreciates the art, he feels it his duty to save the paintings, and will go to any length at all to save them. Scofield gives a fiery, intense performance, making Waldheim a sympathetic and well-rounded character. His final speech to Labiche, as they face-off beside the wrecked train, is poignant and moving in its own twisted way, spelling out the themes of the movie in a most eloquent manner.

Supporting the two leads are a roll call of top-notch French and German talent: Jeanne Moreau as a French war widow who briefly romances Labiche; Suzanne Flon as the idealistic, determined curator; Albert Remy, Charles Millot, Michel Simon, and Jacques Marin as Labiche's colleagues; Wolfgang Priess, Richard Munch and Jean Bouchard as Von Waldheim's colleagues and henchmen.

The Train is simply one of the best, most realistic and entertaining war films of all time. It is to the immense credit of Frankenheimer and his skilled cast and crew that they were able to pull off both realism and entertainment without sacrificing one or the other. 9/10


I'm very seriously considering bumping this rating up to a 10/10.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Tucumcari Bound on September 03, 2008, 12:18:55 AM

I agree Groggy that this is an exceptional film.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 03, 2009, 09:10:28 PM
Way to go, Hulu! http://www.hulu.com/watch/70571/the-train


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: T.H. on May 03, 2009, 09:48:54 PM
I hate, hate, hate Ronin.

Seconds I like, except for the ending. Okay, so it's frightening, but it leaves a lot of questions unanswered, especially: why does Seconds Inc. do what it does? Where does the money come from? Before Rock Hudson went all un-cooperative, what did they expect to get out of him?

A puzzled viewer is not a satisfied viewer!

yeah, I love Seconds but it is rushed, especially the conclusion. The movie could have ventured into many different territories and doesn't really choose any, still an excellent movie.

Before Rock Hudson went all un-cooperative, what did they expect to get out of him?

a happy customer? or am I missing something?


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 04, 2009, 08:47:12 AM
Before Rock Hudson went all un-cooperative, what did they expect to get out of him?

a happy customer? or am I missing something?
Did he pay? I didn't see any money change hands.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on February 02, 2014, 01:39:15 PM
From Twilight Time: THE TRAIN (1964) BLU-RAY - June 10th


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: T.H. on February 03, 2014, 03:39:34 PM
Wow, crap. Thanks for posting all of this news.

There's another one I'm going to drop 35 on.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 23, 2014, 08:40:06 PM
Ooo, ooo, ooo! A vintage French Making Of! It's not subtitled in English, but . . . all the footage is in color! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2pEvr32C7g

Way cool!


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 08, 2014, 03:48:18 PM
TT Blu-ray at the Post Office! (delivery tomorrow) O0


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 09, 2014, 12:05:12 PM
TT Blu in da house!  O0  O0


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 10, 2014, 04:42:15 AM
DJ, don't forget to make another post to let us know when TT blu-ray is in the player. And another one to let us know when the popcorn is in the microwave and the beer is on ice. (If you use enough butter on the popcorn and the beer is a wheat beer, I just may have to join you ;)
Happy viewing!


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 10, 2014, 06:37:41 AM
Yeah, I'll keep you informed.

The Train disc got side-tracked (he he, geddit?) last night on account of the fact The Mechanic came in at the same time and it has better gay subtext.

So maybe I'll get to The Train tonight (except my copies of CC's L'eclisse and All That Heaven Allows come in today--I'm getting swamped here! And my Tokyo trip is tomorrow! I'm never gonna get caught up!)


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 10, 2014, 10:57:59 AM
Tokyo trip tomorrow? YOU'RE GONNA MISS THE MORRICONE CONCERT!! ;)
 L'eclisse is not the kinda movie i can ever watch more than once.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 11, 2014, 10:50:17 AM
Commentary by Redman/Kirgo/Seydor listened to--not something I ever want to sit through again. Well, at least I had really pretty pictures to watch. I haven't listened to the director's commentary yet, but I remember it from the LD days (that makes it 20 years old at least!). Then there's the isolated score--man, when am I gonna have time for all this?

Image-wise, the new TT is fabulous.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 11, 2014, 10:51:46 AM
L'eclisse is not the kinda movie i can ever watch more than once.
Gonna watch the DVD on the flight over. Here's a case where the dual-format release really comes in handy.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Groggy on June 11, 2014, 06:28:28 PM
Commentary by Redman/Kirgo/Seydor listened to--not something I ever want to sit through again. Well, at least I had really pretty pictures to watch. I haven't listened to the director's commentary yet, but I remember it from the LD days (that makes it 20 years old at least!). Then there's the isolated score--man, when am I gonna have time for all this?

Image-wise, the new TT is fabulous.

I liked Frankenheimer's commentary just fine. No need for the interlopers.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 11, 2014, 08:59:03 PM
Grogs, did ya ever get the blu of The Wind and the Lion? Ya gonna get this new one of The Train? Both are very nice.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 17, 2014, 11:07:29 AM
Savant: http://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s4496trai.html


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 20, 2014, 01:06:04 PM
Beev: http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film4/blu-ray_reviews_62_/the_train_blu-ray.htm


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 20, 2014, 03:20:38 PM
the BRD is selling thru Amazon sellers for $69 ..... TCM plays this at least a couple of times a year


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 20, 2014, 03:30:19 PM
You can still get it from Screen Archives for $35. TCM doesn't have this in 1080p.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 21, 2014, 05:45:04 PM
Thank you, Jordan Krug: http://theeditroomfloor.blogspot.ca/2013/06/unseen-making-of-film-from-john.html?m=1


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 21, 2014, 03:59:30 PM
Groggy missed his chance. The TT Blu is officially sold out. Don't worry, though, Grogs, I can always let you have mine  . . .  for $500. Let me know when you want me to send it!


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on July 21, 2014, 06:42:10 PM
Groggy missed his chance. The TT Blu is officially sold out. Don't worry, though, Grogs, I can always let you have mine  . . .  for $500. Let me know when you want me to send it!

... or he can get it for less than $70 on Amazon


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Novecento on July 21, 2014, 07:06:37 PM
Do you think Frankenheimer is upset that "John Frankenheimer's The Train" is now just "The Train" on TT's release? Michael Cimino secured "Michael Cimino"s Heaven's Gate" on the CC release, although maybe that's just to avoid confusion with the religious cult?


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: stanton on July 22, 2014, 01:57:26 AM
Isn't it Burt Lancaster's The Train?

Or who else fired Arthur Penn?


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 22, 2014, 09:54:40 AM
Do you think Frankenheimer is upset that "John Frankenheimer's The Train" is now just "The Train" on TT's release? Michael Cimino secured "Michael Cimino"s Heaven's Gate" on the CC release, although maybe that's just to avoid confusion with the religious cult?
The difference between a live director and a dead one. The live ones have more clout.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 22, 2014, 09:58:57 AM
... or he can get it for less than $70 on Amazon
Sure, but this is the guy who could have had it for half that if he'd pulled the trigger before yesterday. For some reason, I'm thinking he won't pay the 70 . . . he'll wait until the price climbs up high enough that no one will touch it. And then, after he makes his millions, he'll come looking for things to buy. And my price will be attractive.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Novecento on July 22, 2014, 05:19:05 PM
The difference between a live director and a dead one. The live ones have more clout.

Ha - good point!


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 08, 2015, 08:16:45 AM
New Arrow Blu compared with TT's: http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film4/blu-ray_reviews_62_/the_train_blu-ray.htm


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Dust Devil on June 18, 2015, 10:35:10 AM
Interesting thing happened yesterday as I was re-watching this after a long long time: the church bells started ringing the very second they executed the old engineer. :o


8/10


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Dust Devil on June 18, 2015, 10:41:12 AM
The year should be 1964 I believe.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Novecento on June 22, 2015, 12:14:02 PM
Interesting thing happened yesterday as I was re-watching this after a long long time: the church bells started ringing the very second they executed the old engineer. :o


8/10

 ???


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Dust Devil on June 22, 2015, 01:55:50 PM
???

There are no coincidences in life, my friend. ;)


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Novecento on June 24, 2015, 11:52:47 AM
I'm still confused. So Fistful was released in 1964 and has some church bells ringing in it therefore Frankenheimer copied something from Leone  ??? ??? ???


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: Dust Devil on June 26, 2015, 03:38:36 PM
Haha, no, no - the church in real life, not in the  movie. ;) O0


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on August 20, 2015, 10:12:40 AM
big news came down today ... true or  not, who knows

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/E/EU_POLAND_NAZI_TRAIN?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

Two Men Claim to Have Found Nazi Train Loaded With Treasure in Poland

By VANESSA GERA


WARSAW, Poland (AP) -- Two men in Poland claim they have found a legendary Nazi train that according to local lore was loaded with gold, gems and valuable art and vanished into a system of secret tunnels as the Germans fled advancing Soviet forces at the end of World War II.

Historians say the existence of the train has never been conclusively proven, but authorities are not passing up this chance at possibly recovering treasures that have sparked the imaginations of local people for decades.

"We believe that a train has been found. We are taking this seriously," Marika Tokarska, an official in the southwestern Polish district of Walbrzych, told The Associated Press on Thursday.

She said her office has received two letters this month from a law firm representing the men, a Pole and a German who are remaining anonymous, saying they are seeking 10 percent of the value of the train's contents for revealing its location.

She says that hiring a law firm gives credibility to the two men's claims, as do indications that they are familiar with the train's contents.

Already, the district governor has convened a meeting of firefighters, police and others to explore how they can safely handle the train if it is located. Not only could it be armed with explosives, but methane gas underground could add to the risk of an explosion.

"It could be dangerous," Tokarska said.

The train is said to have gone missing in May 1945. Legend says it was armed and loaded with treasure and disappeared after entering a complex of tunnels under the Owl Mountains, a secret project known as "Riese" - or Giant - which the Nazis never finished. At the time the area belonged to Germany but now lies in Poland.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on August 20, 2015, 05:30:42 PM
Cool!  O0

Is that methane I smell, or might it just be a sequel . . . ?


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on August 30, 2015, 01:15:41 PM
From Thursday:

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/20a2758703d54e66bd09a3a1cc149870/polish-official-convinced-mystery-nazi-train-exists

Polish Official 'Convinced' That Mystery Nazi Train Exists

WARSAW, Poland (AP) A leading Polish cultural official said Thursday he is "convinced" of the existence of a Nazi treasure train that has been missing for 70 years and which two men claim to have found recently.

Deputy Culture Minister Piotr Zuchowski also warned treasure hunters in southwestern Poland to stop looking for the "so-called 'gold train'" because it could be mined and dangerous.

Since the end of World War II, local Polish legend has said that a German train filled with gold, gems and armaments went missing around the city of Walbrzych while fleeing the Red Army in 1945. Fortune-hunters have looked for it for decades, and in the communist era, the Polish army and security services even carried out apparently fruitless searches for it.

This month two men, a Pole and a German, said they found a train with armaments and valuables, leading to hopes it could be that long-lost mystery train.

So far no evidence has been offered to the public of the train's existence. However, Zuchowski did hint that there's something to the men's claims and the Culture Ministry announced it will hold a news conference on the topic Friday afternoon.

"In connection with the published information referring to the find of the so-called 'gold train' in the region of Walbrzych, an increase in the activity of treasure hunters has been observed," Zuchowski said in a statement. "I am appealing to people to stop any such searches until the end of official procedures leading to the securing of the find. Inside the hidden train of whose existence I am convinced there could be dangerous materials from the time of World War II. There is a great chance that the train is mined."


From Friday:

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/6c60f5580d4745eeb22d379d5c3ec2fb/radar-detects-object-believed-be-missing-nazi-gold-train

Radar Detects Object Believed to Be Missing Nazi Gold Train
By MONIKA SCISLOWSKA

WARSAW, Poland (AP) A Polish official said Friday he has seen an image made by ground-penetrating radar that seemed to prove the discovery of an armored Nazi train missing in southwestern Poland since World War II.

Local lore says a German train filled with gold, gems and armaments went missing around the city of Walbrzych while it was fleeing the Red Army in the spring of 1945. Fortune-hunters have looked for the so-called "gold train" for decades, and in the communist era, the Polish army and security services carried out apparently fruitless searches for it.

During the war, the Germans built a system of underground tunnels in the mountainous region of Walbrzych and the city of Wroclaw, from where the train is believed to have departed. The area was German territory at the time, but became part of Poland when the war ended.

Recently, a Pole and a German, acting through lawyers, told local authorities they had found an armored train with valuables in a disused tunnel and demanded a financial reward.

Deputy Culture Minister Piotr Zuchowski told reporters the lawyers had been informed the train was over 100 meters (109 yards) long and called it an "exceptional" discovery.

He said he was shown an image albeit blurred from a ground-penetrating radar that showed the shape of a train platform and cannons, and added he was "more than 99 percent certain that this train exists."

"We will be 100 percent sure only when we find the train," Zuchowski added.

The World Jewish Congress said that any gold, precious stones or other valuables that might be found could have been looted from Polish Jews by Nazi officials during the war and should be returned.

"To the extent that any items now being discovered in Poland may have been stolen from Jews before they were sent to death, concentration or forced labor camps, it is essential that every measure is taken to return the property to its rightful owners or to their heirs," the organization's CEO, Robert Singer, said in a statement. "We very much hope that the Polish authorities will take the appropriate action in that respect."

Walbrzych regional authorities will conduct the search, using military explosives' experts, in a procedure that will take "weeks," Zuchowski said.

A person who claimed he helped load the gold train in 1945 said in a "deathbed statement" the train is secured with explosives, Zuchowski said. The person, who was not identified, had also indicated the probable location of the train, he said.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: greenbudgie on April 20, 2017, 05:56:54 AM
I remember enjoying this one just recently. There is a great face-off scene between Labiche and the German officer at the end. It does really bring home the foolishness of greed and war.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on April 20, 2017, 12:33:53 PM
And of obsessive art collecting.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 20, 2017, 02:45:57 PM
And of obsessive art collecting.

What about obsessive art viewing?  ;)


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on April 20, 2017, 04:27:50 PM
What about obsessive anything? Let's imagine the train is not full of paintings but IB Tech prints of our favorite films. These could be the basis for the production of 10,000 immaculate blu rays. And Colonel titoli has stolen them and is taking them back to his crypt in Italy. Should we try to prevent him, even at the cost of many innocent lives? Who will give me a "Yes"?


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: titoli on April 20, 2017, 05:25:11 PM
And Colonel titoli has stolen them

"General" titoli, please.


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on September 03, 2017, 02:23:44 AM
I got the Arrow BRD from amazon.co.uk for just 9.99 pounds plus shipping. It looks beautiful. This was  my first time seeing the movie in its entirety I had previously seen it once but missed the first 45 minutes or so.

The English dubbing of some of the supporting cast is crappy. Otherwise no complaints. This is a really good movie 9/10

I figured out why why DJ loves this movie so much: It's not that he loves seeing Lancaster or Scofield or trains or explosions - it's that he loves seeing Jeanne Moreau's hairy armpits  >:D


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: cigar joe on September 03, 2017, 05:56:44 AM
hairy armpits  >:D

hairy armpits are usually ready indicators to whether the drapes match the carpet.  8)


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: dave jenkins on September 03, 2017, 12:23:19 PM
I figured out why why DJ loves this movie so much: It's not that he loves seeing Lancaster or Scofield or trains or explosions - it's that he loves seeing Jeanne Moreau's hairy armpits  >:D
Why must these things be mutually exclusive? The film boasts a lot of positives: Lancaster, Scofield, Frankenheimer's direction, real explosions, real trains being de-railed . . . AND Jeanne Moreau's real hairy armpits. So many things to enjoy.  O0


Title: Re: The Train (1964)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on September 03, 2017, 12:58:27 PM
Is Moreau's real voice being used?

Some of the dubbing is awful, particularly Albert Remy's. I guess that if Lancaster is supposed to be French but speaking English with mo French accent, it wouldn't make sense to have Remy's charcater speak with a French accent. Still, knowing how Remy sounds in real life, the dub was so bad. In my opinion, if they're dubbing French actors into Emglish, they should use unknown actors. Remy is an actor we've all seen before and know what he sounds like.

Most importantly,  it sounds like they used direct sound with Lancaster for not with the Frenchman the Frenchmen who were dubbed to English. So Lancaster's audio sounds like it is in a different "track" (no pun intended) than Remy's. Ugh. IMO, in each scene, the audio should sound like it is coming from the same source. If there is a scene in which Lancaster and Remy are talking and they are post-dubbing Remy's dialogue, they should also post-dub Lancaster's rather than using direct sound. That way, it it would at least sound like they are in the same room and they are talking to each other. That's what happened in Leone's movies - ALL characters' dialogue is post-dubbed, so whether it is Eastwood using his real voice or Volonte's dialogue being spoken by an English-speaking voice actor, the characters always sound like they are in the same room.