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Films of Sergio Leone => Other Films => Topic started by: The Peacemaker on October 14, 2006, 02:13:36 PM



Title: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: The Peacemaker on October 14, 2006, 02:13:36 PM
Just saw this last night and I loved this film.

If the credits hadn't said " directed by Sam Peckinpah, " most people wouldn't even think this is a Peckinpah film. There's barely any violence, but the sentimentality of the movie made it very enjoyable and is quite refreshing after Sam's other blood-bath work. Jason Robards did a fantastic job as Cable Hogue, a truly lovable character. The theme song " Tomorrow is the Song I Sing " is really catchy too.

There are a few negatives too. I didn't like the " Butterfly Mornings " song which was way too corny. I also didn't like the way the Reverand character constantly changes. First he's a very nice guy, then he's a player ( why did those women let him grab them like that?  ::) ), then he's a nice guy again.

But overall, the film is great. I'm actually considering to make this my favorite Peckinpah film.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: boardwalk_angel on October 14, 2006, 02:31:31 PM
I concur...Jason Robards is simply a wonder in this........ Sam Peckinpah's most playful Western...but no less profound in its depiction of its themes than his more 'serious' films...........a member of my "Ohhhh...so good" category.

Yeah..."Butterfly Mornings...and wildflower afternoons" is a bit much. 


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: cigar joe on October 14, 2006, 07:42:50 PM
I agree its a nice little tragic Wild West, love story, of the fling between a determined man building a dream in the desert and a hooker going off to San Francisco follow her dream, nice poetic touches a great cast of character actors well used, beautiful desert sequences gorgeous cinematogaphy, excellent film.

The score for a sung title song is good, and though it has a duet by Stella and Jason "Butterfly Mornings", it sort of half assed works not taking you out of the picture too badly, another example of a trend in the seventies.  "Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid" had the same type insert and so did "The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean"  ???

Both Stella Stevens and Jason Robards shine.

Sam Peckinpah Lite!

I can see why Sam had an unhappy career, this film should have made money it was embracing the American Dream, wasn't very bloody, had a love interest story that actually appeals to men. And it was a quasi-comedy, not slapstick but more situational comedy. WTF with the general public at the time? Was it not promoted correctly?


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: The Peacemaker on October 14, 2006, 08:06:12 PM
I agree its a nice little tragic Wild West, love story, of the fling between a determined man building a dream in the desert and a hooker going off to San Francisco follow her dream, nice poetic touches a great cast of character actors well used, beautiful desert sequences gorgeous cinematogaphy, excellent film.

The score for a sung title song is good, and though it has a duet by Stella and Jason "Butterfly Mornings", it sort of half assed works not taking you out of the picture too badly, another example of a trend in the seventies.  "Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid" had the same type insert and so did "The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean"  ???

Both Stella Stevens and Jason Robards shine.

Sam Peckinpah Lite!

I can see why Sam had an unhappy career, this film should have made money it was embracing the American Dream, wasn't very bloody, had a love interest story that actually appeals to men. And it was a quasi-comedy, not slapstick but more situational comedy. WTF with the general public at the time? Was it not promoted correctly?


Well the trailer made it look like a silly comedy, when underneath the comedy it's quite a serious film.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: boardwalk_angel on October 14, 2006, 10:02:38 PM
WTF with the general public at the time? Was it not promoted correctly?

I think that after the success of "The Wild Bunch"...audiences...as well as critics, expecting another "Bloody Sam" movie were caught off guard.
In fact.."Cable Hogue" explores one of Peckinpah's favorite recurring themes, that of the end of the Old West..& the advancing "modern" era...just as deeply & thoughtfully..just differently.
It's said to have been his personal favorite of all his films.




Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: cigar joe on October 15, 2006, 06:27:29 AM
I found a somewhat explanation;

From "Peckinpah, The Western Films" by Paul Seydor.


For the demise of "The Ballad of Cable Hogue" lay the blame squarely on Warner Brothers. They were batteling with Peckinpah over the cuts in "The Wild Bunch", first they withdrew all support for TWB in December for the Academy Awards screenings. Next the studios showed an unfinnished cut of TBoCH to the first round of reviewers without mentioning the version shown was not complete. After the finnish of the release print the studio did almost nothing to promote it. Within a month of its release it was difficult to remember wether there ahd ever been such a film.

footnote:

'
"The picture called for theaters near colleges" Peckinpah friend Max Evans wrote, "where it would open slowly and then let the inevitable word of mouth build it. (Sam Pekinpah The Master of Violence) What happend was this, to take just one region of the country as an example. In central Pennsylvania is a town called State College, the main campus of the  Pennsylvania State University where approximately 25,000 students are enrolled each year, the film never played in State College. It played, rather, in a small town about an hour away called Hollidaysburg, with no publicity and consequently little attendance. Imagine this situation replicated around the country." 
 

 





Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Groggy on October 15, 2006, 06:28:58 AM
Wow, Cigar Joe, you beat me to it.  The studio did virtually nothing to promote the film, which is why it flopped.  As Stella Stevens said, "They didn't promote it - they flushed it."


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Banjo on October 18, 2006, 06:53:08 AM
Well the trailer made it look like a silly comedy, when underneath the comedy it's quite a serious film.
Yeah i saw a Peckinpah documentary very recently and with much of the footage seemingly preoccupied with the alluring Stella Stevens character-no complaints there but hopefully there's a decent western buried in there somewhere. ::)
I don't like everything Peckinpah did but the documentary showed him to be in a no win situation,and i have altered my opinion of him somewhat.People either complained about the overly graphic violence but there were protests when Peckinpah left this  stuff out of his films.
Anyway,(from what i've seen)I  still think Ride The High Country is his best western.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on November 20, 2006, 04:57:22 AM
There are many reasons for me why Peckinpah is my #1 film maker, a strong one is the fact that he made 5 masterpieces in less than 5 years! Nobody can top that.
(BUNCH, CABLE, STRAW DOGS, BONNER & GETAWAY - between 1968 & 1972).

I just found an (unofficial) trailer for my own film, funny:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdNJUD3ucPw


(http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL1612/7186524/13731420/206490419.jpg)
[/img]




Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: cigar joe on November 20, 2006, 05:05:44 AM
I want, I want !  ;D


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: moviesceleton on October 25, 2007, 11:20:06 AM
With some editing, Peace's words could be mine:
Just saw this last night and I loved this film.

If the credits hadn't said " directed by Sam Peckinpah, " most people wouldn't even think this is a Peckinpah film. There's barely any violence, but the sentimentality of the movie made it very enjoyable and is quite refreshing after Sam's other blood-bath work. Jason Robards did a fantastic job as Cable Hogue, a truly lovable character. The theme song " Tomorrow is the Song I Sing " is really catchy too.

Overall, the film is great. I'm actually considering to make this my favorite Peckinpah film.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Jill on October 25, 2007, 12:11:02 PM
I loved this movie. It shows Sam's lyrical side. Of course, there are some lyric scenes even in Wild Bunch, but the most watchers didn't recognize them...

Jason Robards is half-god.  O0


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: moviesceleton on October 25, 2007, 12:22:47 PM
I loved this movie. It shows Sam's lyrical side. Of course, there are some lyric scenes even in Wild Bunch, but the most watchers didn't recognize them...

Jason Robards is half-god.  O0
...and Sam Peckinpah is a god. (Sergio Leone is the God)


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on October 25, 2007, 06:36:47 PM
Actually Sam was a poet. He started out reading and reciting poetry, he then studied drama and became a stage director. Tennessee Williams was his favorite. With THE WILD BUNCH he created a monster, in the way, that it over-shawowed his earlier poetry. He tought he could 'get out'. During CABLE he eidted BUNCH and they had a screening of an early 4-hour version (movie-heaven). Sam said to David Warner 'that's it, I made my statement on violence. He wanted to go on with other themes. CAST AWAY, CATCHER IN THE RYE, Max Evans' books... But after the studio sacrificed CABLE he (in a way) had to make STRAW DOGS. Another masterpiece but he was branded for good... And even now, in  times when research on film history is as easy as it never was in 100 years, people seldom realize what he really stood for.

CABLE may now seem unusual in terms of 'Peckinpah-Country', but in 1969 is was a different game: before BUNCH he had made NOON WINE and THE LADY IS MY WIFE. The one is pure drama, the other has no violence at all...
DUNDEE was not about violence, but about a man, RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY is a reflection of his parental background and pure poetry, THE WESTERNER may be the best TV-Westerns ever made - again drama. Content & acting superb, style already there. Violence too, but never overshadowing. After STRAW DOGS he was busted.
One of the best films of the 70's is JUNIOR BONNER. By then it was too late for him - people expected action from those cats, THE GETAWAY they really wanted from Sam/Steve...

But JUNIOR BONNER is a masterpiece. That sad but never sentimental weekend of a family drifting apart, America selling out to money and greed, the loss of the old values for good and two men who try to be themselves in those changing times. It was McQueen's favorite performance. But in public he rarely mentioned it - actors always dread flops.
Ida & Preston are world class. A great rich ripe work of an actors-director who was also one of the best dramatic storytellers and also visually among the Top-ten. His narrative, his editing style, his themes, ambition, timing, action & his taste is hard to top. 

CABLE HOGUE was his hommage to his grandfather, Denver Church. A true American pioneer of the west who was very much involved bringing in water to California (he found water where it wasn't).
I love the film, it is so rich. his scenes are just better than those of 97% of the other film makers. The song may be a bit corny ( i like it, because I do like the tenderness between those two outcasts). Peckinpah loved Richard Gillis and he loved that song. A little know fact is that Gillis wrote the end title song for CONVOY (a film that was heavily altered be the producers). The producers kicked it out and I have video footage of Sam at home singing that song (loudly) to a TV-crew. Impeccable.

CABLE had incredible problems: it rained for weeks! In the desert. A story about a man who is dying of thirst. So the 'little' film went over-budget.  People got very sick, Pickens & Ballard lost parts of their lungs (fever)...
And still they kick Sam's babies - the DVD is bad. Bad quality. But it doesn't matter because

TOMORROW IS THE SONG I SING.....


Sam on the set:
(http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL1612/7186524/13731420/244658346.jpg)


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: titoli on October 27, 2007, 04:20:14 PM
I saw again this movie some months ago and found it exactly as the first time: boring. That's why it wasn't a hit at the time or later. It could have been better but I think it drags too much too often.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: The Firecracker on January 22, 2009, 10:10:12 PM
Underappreciated.
Not very original story but the performances by Robards, Warner and (yes) even Stella Stevens more than make up for it.


8/10


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Groggy on January 22, 2009, 10:49:31 PM
I remember reading Paul Seydor's Peckinpah: The Western Films and him trying to analyze the film as a Western version of The Tempest. Sam was a big Shakespeare fan from what I gather.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: T.H. on January 22, 2009, 11:32:23 PM
Hogue is one my favorite movies. It isn't a perfect by any stretch: the preacher character isn't all that captivating, it meanders a bit, contains a singalong, borrows a bit too much from TWB thematically in the final moments. In spite of that, this movie has a ton of charm (yeah, weak explanation) and Robards, for my money, is the greatest film actor of all time. In some ways, its enchanting atmosphere is reminiscent of Rio Bravo. To me, any potential flaws are negated by Robards and Sam. What a movie. I need to buy this ASAP, I haven't seen it in quite a while.



Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Groggy on April 20, 2009, 04:22:02 PM
Some Groggish commentary...

Quote
Yet another belated addition to our list of prominent directors perused by the blog is Sam Peckinpah. Instead of analyzing his more character-defining classics (Ride the High Country, The Wild Bunch, Straw Dogs), our first review will be his more low-key, light-hearted The Ballad of Cable Hogue, pretty much as far from a Peckinpah film as one could imagine - at least at a glance.

Cable Hogue (Jason Robards) is a grizzled prospector left for dead in the middle of the Arizona desert by, Bowen (Strother Martin) and Taggart (L.Q. Jones). After several days' wandering, he accidentally finds a mudhole which he digs out to find a spring of fresh water. Cable gets the idea to build a stagecoach stop in the parched desert, . In the process he meets a wandering preacher (David Warner) and falls in love. All the while, however, he is awaiting the inevitable return of his old partners, hoping to gain revenge.

With Ballad of Cable Hogue, Peckinpah moves drastically away. Most of Peckinpah's Westerns are a curious mixture of the nihilistic violence and cynicism introduced in the Western genre by films like Vera Cruz and The Magnificent Seven (and of course Sergio Leone's Spaghetti Westerns), and yet also maintain a large degree of John Ford-inspired sentimentality and nostalgia for the good old days. Here Peckinpah whole-heartedly embraces Ford's sentimentality, musing on the death of the West in a lyrical fable. The film's violence is muted and virtually non-existant; the most gruesome scene is the shooting of a Gila Monster in the film's opening, and the human body count is remarkably low (especially considering this film came directly after The Wild Bunch). Though set up as a story of revenge, it's also a gentle, nostalgic musing about a man who found water where it wasn't and made an unlikely name for himself - and also, how the Old West was killed (literally in this case) by the closing of the frontier and the advancement of technology. That Peckinpah is able to tell this story without resorting to his usual tricks of bloody showdowns and overwrought machismo is quite admirable - it's a pity that this side of Peckinpah (along with his creativity) would disappear amidst the haze of booze, drugs and women that would soon overtake him.

The primary criticism that can be levelled at the film is that it is rather sluggish in pacing. The film's storyline is interesting but never quite takes off in its own right; the film is interesting for its characters, writing and technical aspects, but the slow pace and simplistic narrative hurt the film at times (as a few very out-of-place cartoonish elements, including a winking dollar bill and use of slapstick fast-motion in several scenes). Peckinpah defuses the traditional, expected resolution to the revenge story with anti-climax, which is fine, but subsequently provides an overwritten, badly drawn-out and heavily sentimental conclusion that strikes a false note. The film isn't fatally harmed by these problems, but it does prevent the movie from reaching the level of Peckinpah's masterpieces.

Peckinpah's direction is top-notch; more restrained than usual, he eschews his usual style to mostly positive results. The film isn't necessarily identifiable stylistically as a Peckinpah film, but then it isn't necessarily supposed to. Lucien Ballard provides beautiful landscapes of the Arizona desert, and Jerry Goldsmith's score is subtle and effective. The film's handful of songs (especially "Butterfly Mornings") mostly fit into the story and, unlike Bob Dylan's intrusive, obnoxiously twanging score for Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, generally enhances the story.

The cast is wonderful. Jason Robards is a bit hammy at times, but he's very well-suited for the part, bringing a combination of humor and tragic gravity to Hogue. (It's hard watching this film to not think of his previous year's turn as the romantic outlaw Cheyenne in Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West - another favorite we must address in the near-future.) Stella Stevens is superb; beautiful, feisty, and very much an independent woman, she is about as far from Peckinpah's wonton sex object stereotypes (at least those provided by his critics) as one could get, and her chemistry with Robards is wonderful. David Warner is hysterical as the drunken, lecherous priest who becomes Hogue's best friend. Farther down the cast list are solid Peckinpah regulars Slim Pickens, Strother Martin, L.Q. Jones, and, strangely not playing a preacher, R.G. Armstrong.

The Ballad of Cable Hogue is a bit slight (and slow) for its own good, but it's a pleasant-enough film worthy of at least a work. At the very least, it shows a very different side of Peckinpah than most of his work.

Rating: 7/10 - Recommended


http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2009/04/ballad-of-cable-hogue.html (http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2009/04/ballad-of-cable-hogue.html)


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on April 21, 2009, 04:06:06 AM
Each film has to play for an audience who go to see it unprepared. I'd call that a first look.

When you look at it with some knowledge of Sam Peckinpah, the picture appears to be
different and most 'natural' to Sam really.
One of the stupid things about mankind is the typecasting thing. Sam dealt a lot
with violence, but not only of course. Especially in his first 13 years. THE WESTERNER is about character
& a more realistic view of the west. THE RIFLEMAN reflects Sam's youth of growing up in a western
surrounding, thought by 'real' westerners like his father & grandfather.
RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY again. A portrayal of his father & reflection on the dying of the old west.
DUNDEE is a bit different, after not his story. But he worked out one of his favorite themes 'guilt'
pretyy well and close to him.
NOON WINE is literature put into movie poetry. Again about character.
BUNCH overshadows everything because of the impact it had. We're happy it is what it is
(my favorite film next to Easy Rider) but if he'd knew what would come in the 70's, he might have
dealt with grafic violence differently.
Because his heart was really with stuff like Cable Hogue, Junior Bonner & Alfredo Garcia.

Sam studied drama, was a devoted fan to Tennesse Williams.
The typecasting (and his erratic behaviour of course) made people offering him
KILLER ELITE & CROSS OF IRON instead of Jeremiah Johnson &  Cast Away.

He still became one of the best filmmakers ever, but was deeply saddened
that almost no-one appreciated CABLE, BONNER or GARCIA back then.

They are so personal to him, 'hard to find the work of a big commercial
film maker that comes close to that identification!

As for CABLE: Sam's grandfather was a pioneer of the west. He was responsible
for bringing water to a big desert-like part of California. He found water where it wasn't.
Sam's tribute to him.
Religion was a big thing with his family (hence the priest. Peckinpah portrayed
religious people often very cynical - they pray but steal the next moment.
a very realistic view of the world :)
Sam loved whores, therefore we see here a very different and touching
(too romantic for some) relationship beetween an outsider and loner (Sam)
and a female outsider (any nice whore probably :)

So when you know about Sam, it all becomes obvious: the films some viewers without knowledge
call 'less typical Peckinpah films' are in the truth the really typical Sam Films.

But Sam became famous for his spectacular work.
Just like John Ford who in between his big films made low budget
personal films, Sam wanted both.
Sam going over budget all the time kept him from making more
personal small films.  Unfortunately.

L.Q. telling me how it rained snakes on him all day long:
(http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL1612/7186524/21826099/362051685.jpg)
(http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL1612/7186524/21826099/362051686.jpg)



Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Sonny on April 26, 2009, 11:47:00 AM
Underappreciated.
Not very original story but the performances by Robards, Warner and (yes) even Stella Stevens more than make up for it.


8/10

What do you mean "not very original story"??  ???


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Novecento on August 22, 2012, 06:26:11 PM
NOON WINE is literature put into movie poetry. Again about character.

I took the opportunity to watch this at the Library of Congress in Washington DC today. Definitely an hour very well spent  :)

With Jason Robards playing the lead role, I think it would be the perfect extra feature on a nice Blu-ray of The Ballad of Cable Hogue"

Now I see why Peckinpah was such a fan of Kurosawa's Rashomon.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on August 23, 2012, 03:04:21 AM
Was it in color ?


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Novecento on August 23, 2012, 05:30:56 AM
Yes, apparently a donation to the library by Robards. It seemed to be a digitized version of a color TV recording (obviously not the original airing from the 60s which would have been b&w I assume). The quality was not great, but perfectly watchable.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on August 23, 2012, 11:45:50 AM
Oh great! Congrats.

I have it only in b/w, but it was shot and aired in color!
Only two or three color copies still exist. Never saw it in color.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Novecento on August 24, 2012, 04:48:29 PM
If you do any more extras for future Peckinpah releases, you should definitely lobby to get this included. The rights can't cost that much seeing as ABC seems to care little for it.

It would certainly boost the sales of a BD of "The Ballad of Cable Hogue"


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on November 20, 2014, 11:01:10 PM
I started watching The Ballad of Cable Hogue tonight; after an hour and fifteen minutes I decided to cut my losses and stop throwing good time after bad. This is a shitty movie. But I'm usually not interested in comedy and don't like Peckinpah, so, what the hell ...

Btw, reading through this thread, I see discussions of Noon Wine which some of y'all hadn't seen; DJ posted a link to it a little while ago, here it is http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=11517.0 (I actually liked Noon Wine).

I guess that my extreme dislike for Peckinpah is cuz of how many people think he was so great. Looking at it as compared to any other director, ok, he made a few decent films; but when I hear all this talk about him being so great, ugghhhhhhh

The Wild Bunch is alright but insanely overrated, Junior Bonner is decent, for a little tv movie I enjoyed Noon Wine, but IMO this idolization of Peckinpah is crazy.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: stanton on November 21, 2014, 02:07:07 AM
In others opinions obviously not.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: cigar joe on November 21, 2014, 04:44:41 AM
This is the way I look at it, of all of the Westerns that belong to a curious quasi comedy sub genre of Westerns, those Westerns that were quasi spoofs that also included what were basically "music videos" The Ballad of Cable Hogue was the best of the lot.

The Music Video Westerns or MVW's

Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid (1969)
The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972)
The Duchess & The Dirtwater Fox (1976)


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on November 21, 2014, 05:25:21 AM
This is the way I look at it, of all of the Westerns that belong to a curious quasi comedy sub genre of Westerns, those Westerns that were quasi spoofs that also included what were basically "music videos" The Ballad of Cable Hogue was the best of the lot.

The Music Video Westerns

Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid
The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean


perhaps, but I didn't like BC&tSK much. Haven't seen TLaToRB

I once called called BC&tSK a schizophrenic movie; you can say the same about TBOCable Hogue.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: cigar joe on November 21, 2014, 05:44:32 AM
perhaps, but I didn't like BC&tSK much. Haven't seen TLaToRB

I once called called BC&tSK a schizophrenic movie; you can say the same about TBOCable Hogue.


I was modifying while you posted added the other MVW's that I could remember, there may be more.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on November 21, 2014, 07:56:52 AM
I was modifying while you posted added the other MVW's that I could remember, there may be more.

haven't seen The Duchess & the Dirtwater Fox, either  ;)

btw, have you seen Buck and the Preacher (1972) ? (annoying opening score with endless mindless use of the jews harp made me shut it off after a few mins.) but it seemed from the few minutes I saw, it may fit your sub-sub-sub Western category (certainly is in that time period). or am I way off?


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: dave jenkins on November 21, 2014, 09:02:42 AM
haven't seen The Duchess & the Dirtwater Fox, either  ;)
Neither have I. But I have rafted on the very spot made famous by the film.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Dust Devil on December 02, 2014, 08:03:00 AM
I finally watched this. The excitement started falling exponentially with each passing minute, so I had to reset the clock after an hour or so and re-start the next day. What a boring, childish, poor pretense of a movie... I really am not writing this just to antagonize the lot of you here who liked it, but really, I simply could not find a single thing besides Robards worth a passing grade... The philosophy flowing through it seems like a mesh of a child's understanding of the world and a drunkard's delusions about it, sadly, with talent for film-making. It's hard for me to believe the studios ***somehow*** managed to destroy this movie's reputation, what's more likely - they raised it beyond its true quality level.


4/10 (at best)


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: T.H. on December 10, 2014, 07:32:15 PM
I'm not trying to antagonize you (too much), but American Westerns don't seem to be your thing and this movie sort of pays homage to them (and the west in general).

And like OUATIA, this also has a dream theory, and movies with solid dream theory scenarios can not suck. It's written somewhere.

The funny thing is Mr. blood 'n guts & misogyny, Sam Peckinpah, was one of the most romantic (for a lack of a better word) filmmakers of all time.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Dust Devil on December 13, 2014, 12:43:21 PM
The movie also has several connections to OUATITW.

About Americas Ws: I usually do prefer Spaghetti's (it's hard to override what you learned as a kid), but a good one is a good one. Here I really wanted to like this movie... The major problem is Sam Peckinpah: having first watched PGABTK of all of his movies, which still is at the top of my favorite Ws list (despite KK and Bob Dylan), I just felt everything else (few noble exceptions aside) was a steep downride. The saddest thing in this world I think is watching potential not being developed in the proper way. In that department Sam, God bless his soul, climbs up to the very top.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: stanton on December 13, 2014, 01:10:35 PM
I think he developed enough, and Cable Hogue is one of his loveliest characters, and a fine film. Peckinpah like Cable often found water were it wasn't.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 17, 2017, 06:55:03 AM
Warner Blu due June 13: http://videoeta.com/log/?blu-ray


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Novecento on May 17, 2017, 09:18:04 AM
Nice!


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: T.H. on May 17, 2017, 11:50:29 AM
http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/The-Ballad-of-Cable-Hogue-Blu-ray/44310/

I'll definitely double dip for this as long as the transfer is good. I really wish they would release the Peckinpah westerns collection on bluray but it seems like box sets aren't much of a thing anymore.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 17, 2017, 12:09:13 PM
According to Blu-ray.com:
Quote
Special Features and Specs:
•NEW Remaster
•Audio Commentary by Nick Redman, Paul Seydor, Garner Simmons and David Weddle
•Featurette - "The Ladiest Damn'd Lady: An Afternoon with Stella Stevens"
•Original Theatrical Trailer (HD)
•Optional English SDH subtitles


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Spikeopath on May 17, 2017, 12:46:59 PM
I wouldn't be doing my Peckinpah acolyte duties if I didn't add my review.

Peckinpah's lyrical vision of the West provides humour and comfort to director and viewer alike.

The Ballad Of Cable Hogue sees Sam Peckinpah in jolly form. There is nothing here to trouble the censors, a bit of violence here and there - and some nasty human traits seam through the story, but this is purely a funny and touching movie that again deals with a Peckinpah fave theme of the Old West passing. Only difference is here he has his tongue firmly in cheek as he observes the thirst for finance sweeping across the country.

Cable Hogue is a prospector left for dead in the desert by his two double-crossing partners Bowen & Taggart. Wandering across the desert talking to god, Hogue collapses during a sandstorm and finds mud on his boot, after digging down for a while he finds the miracle of water (though Hogue badly misspells this on his advertisement). An encounter with preacher Joshua convinces Hogue to go patent his spring and make a killing selling water to the passing stagecoach trail that runs by his newly found oasis. After striking a deal in the town of Dead Dog, Hogue is set up nicely while into the bargain he falls for gorgeous prostitute Hildy. The film cheekily (just like Hogue) has established itself as a fine piece by the time it takes it's dark turn. It seems that revenge is the new found recipe on the Cable Springs Menu.

This was Sam Peckinpah's favourite film from his own CV, it's his most personal, he apparently saw a lot of himself in Cable Hogue, and with that in mind the film does gain a bit more emotional heart. But strikingly, it's the humour in there that shouldn't be understated, this was the director at one with himself, and the result is lyrical deftness. The cast are great, Jason Robards is wonderful in the title role, Stella Stevens as Hildy shows a fine actress at work. So much so it only makes me lament that she didn't have a great and industrious career post Cable Hogue. Peckinpah faves Strother Martin, L.Q. Jones & Slim Pickens reward their loyal director with impacting shows, while David Warner as the confused preacher Joshua practically steals the film with his hedonistic leanings.

Don't go into this film expecting a blood and thunder Western and you will be pleasantly surprised at it's heartbeat. Different sort of Peckinpah, but it's also essential Peckinpah. 9/10


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 30, 2017, 07:38:20 AM
https://trailersfromhell.com/the-ballad-of-cable-hogue/

Savant makes the case for Hogue being a musical (at least in part). I'd never thought of it before, but I guess this film would make a good double bill with Paint Your Wagon.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 09, 2017, 06:57:23 PM
http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/The-Ballad-of-Cable-Hogue-Blu-ray/44310/

I'll definitely double dip for this as long as the transfer is good.
Reach for your wallet!
Quote
For this 1080p, AVC-encoded Blu-ray, the Warner Archive Collection commissioned a new scan, which was performed by Warner's Motion Picture Imaging facility at 2K using a recently struck interpositive. An original 1970 dye transfer (IB) Technicolor answer print was used for color reference; although the answer print itself was battered, Technicolor's dye transfer process is noted for its resistance to fading. The Blu-ray image reflects the care with which MPI has managed the film's many dissolves and superimpositions, which were accomplished optically with the concomitant loss of detail and sharpness and accentuated grain. Cable Hogue's opticals blend smoothly into the flow of the film, never standing out as qualitatively distinct. It helps that Ballard's photography has a soft, film-like texture that doesn't sacrifice image detail. Cable's weather-beaten attire (which is replaced by finery, as he prospers), Hildy's playfully come-hither outfits, and Rev. Joshua's dusty black uniform are all reproduced in detail, along with the copious sand of Cable Springs and the hardy creatures who inhabit it (mostly rattlesnakes and lizards), and the gradually improving structures of Cable's desert establishment. The film's palette is consistently dusty and faded, except for a few eruptions of richly saturated color, mostly near the end. The grain pattern is natural and finely rendered. WAC has mastered Cable Hogue at its usual high bitrate, here 34.99 Mbps.
http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/The-Ballad-of-Cable-Hogue-Blu-ray/44310/#Review


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on June 10, 2017, 02:05:41 AM
A shame Warner doesn't include supplements produced by free-lancers any longer.
I shot interviews with 5 people who had worked on the film. Well at least it
is finally available. Meantime I finished work on the JUNIOR BONNER Blu-ray...


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Novecento on June 12, 2017, 08:47:45 AM
A shame Warner doesn't include supplements produced by free-lancers any longer.
I shot interviews with 5 people who had worked on the film. Well at least it
is finally available.

Is that a corporate policy? Is it too much work for them or too expensive?

Meantime I finished work on the JUNIOR BONNER Blu-ray...

Looking forward to that.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on June 12, 2017, 09:27:51 AM
-- You'd have to ask them, not me :). Policy, yes, only material produced by Warners (or for Warners, years ago...)

-- BONNER: 120 minutes of supplements :).


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 14, 2017, 12:34:57 PM
-- BONNER: 120 minutes of supplements :).
The deuce, you say! You're all right Mike. I don't care what the other board members say about you! >:D


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on June 14, 2017, 02:47:44 PM
Looks like I'll make my first interview-featurette on Leone later this summer.
By sheer co-incidence. Seems I can't get rid of film history, the next feature has to wait.
Looks like the new GBU BD will also include two short pieces I did (promo stuff & stills only).


Board members talking bad? I couldn't care less. I'm about as old-fashioned as Peckinpah himself:
I only (fully) respect people I know the faces & names of. Talking bad about others
without revealing your name & face is about as chicken as one can become :).
But I stick to these forums because in about 15 years I did meet at least 10 friends
there, fine people, some of them even use their own name :).


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: Novecento on June 16, 2017, 11:43:15 AM
Looks like I'll make my first interview-featurette on Leone later this summer.

Can you tell us more...?


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on June 17, 2017, 07:42:55 AM
I'm superstitous :).
Once I have it in the camera...


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on June 20, 2017, 01:59:48 AM
Beautiful print this CABLE Blu-ray! Looks better than on 35.


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 20, 2017, 02:59:48 AM
Looks like I'll make my first interview-featurette on Leone later this summer.
By sheer co-incidence. Seems I can't get rid of film history, the next feature has to wait.
Looks like the new GBU BD will also include two short pieces I did (promo stuff & stills only).


Board members talking bad? I couldn't care less. I'm about as old-fashioned as Peckinpah himself:
I only (fully) respect people I know the faces & names of. Talking bad about others
without revealing your name & face is about as chicken as one can become :).
But I stick to these forums because in about 15 years I did meet at least 10 friends
there, fine people, some of them even use their own name :).

Where did this rant come from? Who was talking bad about you?  ???


Title: Re: The Ballad of Cable Hogue (1970)
Post by: mike siegel on June 20, 2017, 03:17:43 AM
I don't even have the time and will to recall ... I'm a member in 10 forums, and in almost
everyone there's somebody ... Like I said, I don't care. That's part of the game: when
I started writing & film making 60 years ago many colleagues warned me to join up these forums.
In fact I know some pretty famous filmmakers that wandered around and left in
a matter of weeks or months, they couldn't stand the cowardice and bad language. But I never cared
that much because I had a good start and over the years got half a dozen of jobs thanks to people finding me
in the internet. So I might as well overcome the "company" of some bad-mannered people
equipped with bad taste as well in some cases :).
It is the same with ebay. It can be really really bad, I have nutcases and even genuine psychopaths on my back every
year, but I also sold 10,000 items in 20 years and found incredible stuff I never dreamed of finding. So why complain :).
In fact I financed PASSION & POETRY with eBay.