Sergio Leone Web Board

Films of Sergio Leone => Duck, You Sucker => Topic started by: tucos on December 08, 2006, 06:22:12 AM



Title: Revolution
Post by: tucos on December 08, 2006, 06:22:12 AM
Do you think that Leone shown the whole meaning of the revolution in the scene, in which, after Miranda's monologue, Mallory throws a book in the mud?


Title: Re: Revolution
Post by: dave jenkins on December 08, 2006, 09:55:20 AM
I think the director expresses his feelings about "revolution" in that scene, yes.


Title: Re: Revolution
Post by: Juan Miranda on December 08, 2006, 06:34:28 PM
Naw. I think he is being is sarcastic, and trying to thinly disguise his sympathy for the Red Brigades. Leone really wanted to blow up airports and kill Italian politicians instead of making films with grumpy Rod Steiger (who only took the piss out of him on screen).


Title: Re: Revolution
Post by: dave jenkins on December 09, 2006, 09:54:23 AM
 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D


Title: Re: Revolution
Post by: geoman-1 on December 16, 2006, 08:27:15 AM
Naw. I think he is being is sarcastic, and trying to thinly disguise his sympathy for the Red Brigades. Leone really wanted to blow up airports and kill Italian politicians instead of making films with grumpy Rod Steiger (who only took the piss out of him on screen).
   
                           2
                        ;D


Title: Re: Revolution
Post by: marmota-b on December 17, 2006, 03:47:06 AM
                           2
                        ;D
                                                           n
Talking about math, what about...  ;D   ?


Title: Re: Revolution
Post by: Sackett on December 30, 2006, 09:27:40 PM
For me, Juan's monologue on revolution is one of the more poignant speeches ever found in cinema.  How can anyone not be moved by it?


Title: Re: Revolution
Post by: Leonardo on December 31, 2006, 06:01:09 AM
Do you think that Leone shown the whole meaning of the revolution in the scene, in which, after Miranda's monologue, Mallory throws a book in the mud?

Yes for sure, but also don't forget that the finished film began with a quotation from Mao Tse Tung (cut from American and English prints), in capital letters on a black background:

THE REVOLUTION
IS NOT A SOCIAL DINNER,
A LITERARY EVENT,
A DRAWING OR AN EMBROIDERY;
IT CANNOT BE DONE WITH
ELEGANCE AND COURTESY.
THE REVOLUTION IS AN ACT OF VIOLENCE.