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Films of Sergio Leone => Other Films => Topic started by: titoli on January 01, 2007, 06:02:04 PM



Title: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on January 01, 2007, 06:02:04 PM
Maybe I'm partial to this movie, though somebody here appreciates it as well. The fact I've been watching it costantly after I first saw it at the theatre, on tv. Over here it is aired once a year and I always catch some snippet, though I never watch it completely. I've finally come across my 3 euros dvd and could watch it undubbed. It is my favourite Wayne, probably, more than Shootist, Liberty, El Dorado or Searchers. I don't want to imply I can't find faults in his acting. As I have written elsewhere I don't like his delivery, too punctuated to sound natural, can't understand why nobody told him to speak more fluently instead of dragging every word. Still his mimicry is tops and the character is the one he was meant for when he was born. He couldn't have played Cogburn before spaghetti. Cogburn's morals are too loose compared to Wayne's earlier incarnations. What everybody thought at the time, that his was more an achievement Oscar than a real one he earned, was uncorrect. Wayne deserved it completely. What I cannot understand reading some comments here is why many can't see Kim Darby's excellence too. I'm always been impressed by her performance, on a par with Wayne's: the chemistry between the two is sublime, I could be there watching their repartees for hours. And not to be forgotten is also Duvall's performance: he sketches a badman character without pressing on his devilish traits. He's bad because he's bad, that's all.
The main fault with the movie lies with the score. It could have been written 15 years before, as unoriginal as can be. 


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: The Peacemaker on January 01, 2007, 06:16:01 PM
I liked True Grit alot.

I like the way Rooster Cogburn is more of an anti-hero character instead of his usual pure hero.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Sackett on January 01, 2007, 07:21:09 PM
And when John Wayne wasn't playing his usual self, his role would really shine, such as Searchers and Liberty.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: The Firecracker on January 02, 2007, 01:31:27 AM
And when John Wayne wasn't playing his usual self, his role would really shine, such as Searchers and Liberty.


"Big Jake" has another amoral John Wayne as the hero.
The film is surprisingly gory too. Missed the R rating by very little.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on January 02, 2007, 04:40:39 AM
True Grit is ok, and of course the anti hero turn by Wayne as Cogburn had the SW influence or at least as you say opened the door to that type of portrayal. Kim Darby's turn was excellent also but I have to admit that I find the type of woman she portrayed as quite annoying, prehaps that clouds our judgement, it definitely does mine. Glen Campbell wasn't an accet either. The fim is entertaining though.

The film was shot primarily in California, and Durango, Mexico, so it hardly resembled the high plains Indian Territory, the mtn peaks were a bit too high and rugged, its like Fords "Drums Along the Mowhawk" which doesn't look like anything around here (upstate NY).


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on January 02, 2007, 05:51:16 AM
Quote
I find the type of woman she portrayed as quite annoying, prehaps that clouds our judgement, it definitely does mine

Well, she's not a woman but a rather young girl (under or who just turned 16) who's a bookkeeper by profession and mentality, with little experience of life (and rugged pioneer life at that) and lives by literally accepted principles: but she will learn to relent from the experiences and that is what the film is also about: strange that you didn't catch that as I think it is rather plain, in tipical hollywoodian fashion.



Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on January 02, 2007, 05:18:56 PM
Well, as I've said elsewhere, I like this film a lot, and its chief virtue (among many) is its language. This is due to its faithfulness to Charles Portis's novel, which has characters speaking like no other characters in Western films. I don't know if that is the way people spoke in 19th Century Arkansas, but it is certainly not the way people spoke in America in 1969, or at any time in Hollywood Westerns, and it is certainly refreshing to hear. I usually like my Westerns visual without much dialogue, but if you ARE going to do a talky Western, then doing it with dialogue like Portis's is the way to go.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Sackett on January 02, 2007, 07:15:42 PM
Just finished reading the book.  Language in book was about the same as the movie. The movie and book hold together faithfully until the very end.
I won't spoil it for anyone in case they want to read the book also.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 18, 2007, 04:12:27 PM
Comparison of the new SE with the old release is up at Beaver: http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/DVDReviews16/true_grit_dvd_review.htm


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Banjo on May 18, 2007, 05:05:52 PM
Kim Darby's turn was excellent also but I have to admit that I find the type of woman she portrayed as quite annoying, prehaps that clouds our judgement, it definitely does mine.
Surely that was the intention CJ?

Yes this is probably my favourite Wayne film and his most colourful role.The finale when he takes on the (i think) 3 guys guys on horseback armed with a rifle in each hand while biting the saddle strap with his teeth is total classic. :)


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 18, 2007, 05:36:27 PM
Spot on, Banjo! O0


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Man with no dame on May 18, 2007, 10:27:09 PM
This movie has some really nice supporting bits by the recently deceased Jeremy Slate(very underappreciated character actor and one of my favorite biker movie badguys), Jeff Corey and Dennis Hopper. For anyone interested, look up Kim Darby, she was a girl then, she's a babe now. rrrrrrr >:D! Favorite Wayne line: "Why, you aint no bigger than a corn nubbin!" Still not sure to this day what that meant.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 19, 2007, 08:22:57 AM
For anyone interested, look up Kim Darby, she was a girl then, she's a babe now. rrrrrrr >:D!
She's 60 years old! (b. 1947) You got a thing for older women, eh?


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Man with no dame on May 19, 2007, 08:31:36 AM
When they look that good, yeah, I don't discriminate. I'd take her over Paris Hilton any old day of the week.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on May 19, 2007, 04:21:07 PM
(http://www.collectinghollywood.com/scrapb102.jpg):P



I love Paris in the morning and in the evening. And at night. If she's sober.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Man with no dame on May 19, 2007, 04:37:00 PM




I love Paris in the morning and in the evening. And at night. If she's sober.
You just had to pick the worst picture on that site, didn't you Titoli? You've obviously never lived in Florida. I can introduce you to some 30 year old women with really botched plastic surgery. :o


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Noodles_SlowStir on May 19, 2007, 04:39:36 PM
Wow.  Hadn't seen her or pic of her recently.  Always remember them as a flickering shadow image usually from another time.   Can be as alarming as looking into the mirror.....  :o

Quote
I love Paris in the morning and in the evening. And at night. If she's sober.

Should be sober in lockdown....even if it turns out to be some kind of condo village with locks.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on May 19, 2007, 05:13:42 PM
Quote
You just had to pick the worst picture on that site, didn't you Titoli?

Just picked the first that came up. I was in love with this woman when she was young. Though she was no beauty. I think she holds herself up well, but to say she is (or ever was ) a match for Paris is beyond my comprehension.

Quote
I can introduce you to some 30 year old women with really botched plastic surgery.

I could accept your invitation. I'm past botched everything.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Man with no dame on May 19, 2007, 05:48:17 PM
. Though she was no beauty. I think she holds herself up well, but to say she is (or ever was ) a match for Paris is beyond my comprehension.

 
  I tend, now, to judge women and everyone else from the inside out. Paris Hilton and her contemporaries, comport themselves with little or no class. I'll take quiet beauty anyday over that.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: The Peacemaker on May 19, 2007, 06:05:08 PM
  I tend, now, to judge women and everyone else from the inside out. Paris Hilton and her contemporaries, comport themselves with little or no class. I'll take quiet beauty anyday over that.

Amen brother!


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: tucumcari bound on May 19, 2007, 10:52:07 PM
I agree that True Grit is a pretty great film. I grew up in a house where John Wayne is like god as my father is a huge fan. I grew up watching all of John Wayne's films and True Grit played here regularly. I love all the performances including Kim Darby's which is underrated. Obviously, I hate it when people say that John Wayne cannot act as you can see here that clearly isn't true. Also, look at his performances in The Searchers and preticularly Red River which in my opinion was one of the most underrated and over-looked performances of his career. I think that film is a masterpiece and also should get the recognition it deserves. Anyway, in my opinon True Grit is a western classic, and Wayne, Darby, and Duval were fantastic. A western that should not be missed.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Man with no dame on May 20, 2007, 07:27:52 AM
 
Obviously, I hate it when people say that John Wayne cannot act as you can see here that clearly isn't true..
  I feel as strongly about Wayne as you do about Stallone, Tucumcari. I have met many who dislike Wayne, but usually have never seen anything he was in, or else some butchered print on cable. If you go on other film chat lines and bring up the topic of John Wayne, you'll be able to feel the blank stares thru your keyboard. Apparently, film schools nowdays dismiss him as merely a pop personality. I've never heard Scorsese champion preservation of his films. Too bad, for Wayne, along with the likes of William S. Hart, Roy Rogers, Tom Mix etal., are the founders of the American Western and a source of inspiration to filmmakers as diverse as Fritz Lang and Jean Luc Goddard. All you have to do is watch a few of Wayne's movies to realize how good an actor he was. Even in his later years, he was consistently the top male box-office draw in the US, rivaled only by Eastwood. Pretty bold achievement for an old one-eyed fat man. Anybody on this site should immerse themselves in at least 5(or more) of his films before commenting on his acting skills. They will then see how important he is, especially, to this site.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: tucumcari bound on May 20, 2007, 09:12:50 PM
    I feel as strongly about Wayne as you do about Stallone, Tucumcari. I have met many who dislike Wayne, but usually have never seen anything he was in, or else some butchered print on cable. If you go on other film chat lines and bring up the topic of John Wayne, you'll be able to feel the blank stares thru your keyboard. Apparently, film schools nowdays dismiss him as merely a pop personality. I've never heard Scorsese champion preservation of his films. Too bad, for Wayne, along with the likes of William S. Hart, Roy Rogers, Tom Mix etal., are the founders of the American Western and a source of inspiration to filmmakers as diverse as Fritz Lang and Jean Luc Goddard. All you have to do is watch a few of Wayne's movies to realize how good an actor he was. Even in his later years, he was consistently the top male box-office draw in the US, rivaled only by Eastwood. Pretty bold achievement for an old one-eyed fat man. Anybody on this site should immerse themselves in at least 5(or more) of his films before commenting on his acting skills. They will then see how important he is, especially, to this site.

We definitely agree on this subject MWND! I feel just as strong about John Wayne as you do. I enjoyed reading what you wrote and am happy to know now that you're a fan of "The Duke". It's funny when you come across as many people as you do who do not feel he could act, yet he's still on many most popular actor's survey's still today. He's as popular as ever.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 20, 2007, 11:03:08 PM
I've never liked the Duke's war films, or any of the modern dress films he made, but his Westerns are classics, and his performances are especially good in Red River, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, The Searchers (bad film, great performance), and True Grit. People who don't like Wayne don't like Westerns, and people who don't like Westerns are a waste of space.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Man with no dame on May 21, 2007, 04:19:25 AM
I've never liked the Duke's war films, or any of the modern dress films he made,
   A long time ago, I was working into the wee hours, and had the tube on for company, a John Wayne war movie came on. I hadn't, at that time, had much exposure to Wayne's war flicks, other than Sands of Iwo Jima. So I thought I'd give it a try. Four hours later, the sun was coming up, and I was totally blown away with what I had just watched. The movie was They Were Expendable and I do recommend you see this. Perhaps one of the most brutal and honest stories about PT boat warfare, and I'd stack this up against Private Ryan any day. Wayne was brilliant. The Green Berets, a victim of bad timing as far as the time of it's release, is another of his better war films. I will give it to you on this one, McQ was not a favorite of mine. They made this during the inner city detective film boom of the early 70's, and Wayne looked like a fish out of water. Never liked Hatari either, with him chasing rhinos. Of course, you have to see Ghengis Khan at least once, a constant source of embarassment to Wayne(his Paint Your Wagon). "More rice, Pilgrim?" Fortunately, he made very few films like those.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 09, 2007, 09:34:08 AM
Here's an interesting homage to the film and a review of the DVD CE. The info seems pretty good (except it is wrong to compare author Portis to the Gone With the Wind lady or Harper Lee: Portis has published 5 novels). Anyway: http://www.cinemaretro.com/index.php?/archives/167-REVIEW-TRUE-GRIT-DVD-SPECIAL-COLLECTORS-EDITION.html#extended


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on July 12, 2007, 06:17:35 AM
    I feel as strongly about Wayne as you do about Stallone, Tucumcari. I have met many who dislike Wayne, but usually have never seen anything he was in, or else some butchered print on cable. If you go on other film chat lines and bring up the topic of John Wayne, you'll be able to feel the blank stares thru your keyboard. Apparently, film schools nowdays dismiss him as merely a pop personality. I've never heard Scorsese champion preservation of his films. Too bad, for Wayne, along with the likes of William S. Hart, Roy Rogers, Tom Mix etal., are the founders of the American Western and a source of inspiration to filmmakers as diverse as Fritz Lang and Jean Luc Goddard. All you have to do is watch a few of Wayne's movies to realize how good an actor he was. Even in his later years, he was consistently the top male box-office draw in the US, rivaled only by Eastwood. Pretty bold achievement for an old one-eyed fat man. Anybody on this site should immerse themselves in at least 5(or more) of his films before commenting on his acting skills. They will then see how important he is, especially, to this site.

I think most of the dislike directed towards Wayne is based on his political views more than anything else. He is, even today, one of, if not the most popular movie stars ever. Why? Because he's a cool guy and a larger-than-life hero; the kind of guy everyone looks up to, at least as a kid.

I've seen about 20 films with Wayne, mostly Westerns, and while he's no Olivier he has a lot more range than he's given credit for. A lot of his contemporaries, directors, and peers felt the same way. Watch "Red River" or "The Searchers", and then watch one of his more typical hero roles like "The Alamo" or "Rio Bravo" - it's definitely not the same character. Granted, he's not a truly great actor, but he never claimed to be, so I don't think that should be held against him.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on July 12, 2007, 07:39:19 AM
Quote
while he's no Olivier

Yeah, he's better.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 12, 2007, 12:16:41 PM
Titoli scores again! (and from behind the 3-point line)  O0 O0 O0


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on July 12, 2007, 03:54:11 PM
Does that make me bring anything home?


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 12, 2007, 04:11:10 PM
Sorry, no.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on July 12, 2007, 05:29:45 PM
Titoli scores again! (and from behind the 3-point line)  O0 O0 O0

What are you on about, Dave? :P

If any of the "English Acting Knights" was overrated, it's Ralph Richardson. Leave Olivier alone.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on July 12, 2007, 06:50:42 PM
And you do the same with Wayne.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 13, 2007, 12:02:17 AM
If any of the "English Acting Knights" was overrated, it's Ralph Richardson.
Grogs, you are either on drugs or you have never seen The Heiress. Of course, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on July 13, 2007, 07:07:16 AM
And you do the same with Wayne.

Hey dude, if you read my post I was praising Wayne, not bashing him. What's your problem?


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 13, 2007, 09:13:16 AM
You used "while he's no Olivier" in your compliment! As if Olivier were superior!! A stage actor, superior to the ultimate cinematographic performer!!! Dude, what's you're problem???? >:D


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on July 13, 2007, 12:25:49 PM
Quote
Dude, what's you're problem?

You can tell DJ is angry when his english begins to falter. So beware, Dude.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on July 13, 2007, 06:49:21 PM
You used "while he's no Olivier" in your compliment! As if Olivier were superior!! A stage actor, superior to the ultimate cinematographic performer!!! Dude, what's you're problem???? >:D

My God, Dave, do you have to argue with every single post I make? ::)


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 13, 2007, 07:02:37 PM
Huh? You're the one arguing with every post *I* make! :D


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on March 13, 2008, 07:32:50 PM
Watched this tonight on TCM really enjoyed it and appreciate it more now than I did back when it first came out, its superior to most of what passes for Westerns nowadays, by directors that don't have a clue.  O0


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on March 13, 2008, 08:18:48 PM
Yeah . . . and if you can look past the fact that Colorado plays Arkansas and Oklahoma in the picture, you can enjoy the film quite a bit.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on March 14, 2008, 02:13:17 AM
Watched this tonight on TCM really enjoyed it and appreciate it more now than I did back when it first came out, its superior to most of what passes for Westerns nowadays, by directors that don't have a clue.  O0

 O0

How about Wayne's performance, CJ?


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on March 14, 2008, 04:40:14 AM
Wayne's performance definitely  O0, anytime he wasn't doing his autopilot same old same old shtick he's great, yea he deserved that Oscar.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on March 14, 2008, 05:57:32 AM
Wayne was great in this but after reading some of the previous posts I had an image of Wayne as Richard 111.  Perhaps not a good idea.

 ;D


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on March 14, 2008, 06:22:38 AM
The image of Wayne that comes out of all this is that of John Wayne. Nobody can play Wayne like John Wayne. And here he plays Wayne at his best. Don't know where the Richard III idea comes from.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on March 16, 2008, 06:58:10 PM
Been thinking about this Western a bit more the last couple of days.

I actually saw it in the theater on Times Square.  One of the big things I now remember that struck me at the time I watched it was the dialog, nowadays you may not notice it especially after say watching HBO's Deadwood.  I think this film was a trend setter in that respect.

The dialog strived to sound more authentic to the time period, this was one of the first Westerns to make that obvious. At the time I remember not liking it all that much, it seemed a little bit contrived at the time. Compared to the seemingly almost run-on sentence feeling dialog in Deadwood it now seems quaint. I think we are getting too authentic.

For me the verdict on this trend is still out, but I'm tending not to like it.

I think if it overpowers the story line or the enjoyment of the film it becomes a distraction. Its almost close to watching a foreign language film, you got to really pay attention, the speach patterns and words are that different. What would be in modern language a simple statement becomes quite convoluted.  I remember thinking listening to Ian McShane doing his lines and wondering if he was going to run out of breath, same with the William Sanderson and Alma characters.

I'm tending to think modern speach patterns are more effective in getting the point across to the majority audience, in our mind we know that people living in the West in the 1800's would have said the sentence differently back then, but the modern language makes the meaning quite crystal clear. Call modern speach artistic license.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on March 16, 2008, 08:01:19 PM
The image of Wayne that comes out of all this is that of John Wayne. Nobody can play Wayne like John Wayne. And here he plays Wayne at his best. Don't know where the Richard III idea comes from.

LOL. Probably the mentions of Olivier and Richardson. Just a guess, though.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on March 16, 2008, 09:49:57 PM
Been thinking about this Western a bit more the last couple of days.

I actually saw it in the theater on Times Square.  One of the big things I now remember that struck me at the time I watched it was the dialog, nowadays you may not notice it especially after say watching HBO's Deadwood.  I think this film was a trend setter in that respect.

The dialog strived to sound more authentic to the time period, this was one of the first Westerns to make that obvious. At the time I remember not liking it all that much, it seemed a little bit contrived at the time. Compared to the seemingly almost run-on sentence feeling dialog in Deadwood it now seems quaint. I think we are getting too authentic.

For me the verdict on this trend is still out, but I'm tending not to like it.

I think if it overpowers the story line or the enjoyment of the film it becomes a distraction. Its almost close to watching a foreign language film, you got to really pay attention, the speach patterns and words are that different. What would be in modern language a simple statement becomes quite convoluted.  I remember thinking listening to Ian McShane doing his lines and wondering if he was going to run out of breath, same with the William Sanderson and Alma characters.

I'm tending to think modern speach patterns are more effective in getting the point across to the majority audience, in our mind we know that people living in the West in the 1800's would have said the sentence differently back then, but the modern language makes the meaning quite crystal clear. Call modern speach artistic license.
Bold talk for a one-eyed fat man.

I like the use of language in TG, it's one of the things that sets the movie apart. Most of the dialogue comes from the novel, although considerably pared down. I think Portis did a great job of pastiching 19th Century idioms, possibly helped in places by actual court transcripts. I wouldn't for anything wish to pass up the opportunity to hear such lines as "He never played me false until he kilt me," and "Fill your hands, you sonofabitch."

I take your point about the difficulties in getting archaic speech to register with contemporary audiences, but we get plenty of period pieces where 21st century locutions are used. Why not allow room for both approaches? And there is perhaps a third way: I'm guessing the narration in The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford was taken from the source novel. Although it wasn't strictly 19th Century pastiche, the language is highly literary and thus conveys a sense of time before Hemingway. I'm watching Wild Bill on AMC right now and it uses narration in much the same way . . .


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: cigar joe on March 17, 2008, 04:24:43 AM
Oh I agree with most of what you say about True Grit, looking at it now its a treasure for those reasons,  but I look at Deadwood and see it going to the extreme. Deadwood became more of a Western Soap Opera, heavily dialog driven making it a bit too comonplace, almost like everyday life. The West in reality was probably for most people was just as boring as today's everyday existance.

I guess I want more Mythology less Reality. lol


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Panache on July 19, 2008, 06:18:56 PM
ths was my dads fav western, ilik it, bt not as much as others

thy put it on tv so much its imposible nt to see it, but th gunfihgt in th field is still cool as hell


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Ben Tyreen on July 19, 2008, 11:31:40 PM
Quote
thy put it on tv so much its imposible nt to see it, but th gunfihgt in th field is still cool as hell

  Fill your hands, you son of a bitch!

  One of my all-time favorite Duke lines.  It's also worth checking out the entertaining but not as good sequel "Rooster Cogburn...and the Lady" to see Wayne team with Katharine Hepburn, truly a great pairing of two actors in the twilight of their careers.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on July 20, 2008, 06:05:37 AM
The words "Katharine" and "Hepburn" put me off watching that one more than anything else. :D


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 20, 2008, 09:24:27 AM
She had her moments, but they were all in the 30s and 40s. As an older actress her mannerisms were just annoying.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on July 20, 2008, 04:22:04 PM
She had her moments, but they were all in the 30s and 40s. As an older actress her mannerisms were just annoying.

The only movie to date I've liked her in was Summertime. Although to be fair, I didn't want to kill her through most of The Philadelphia Story.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 20, 2008, 04:27:55 PM
I like her in PS too. I recently saw her on TCM in Woman of the Year (her first film with Tracy) and in some scenes she was actually--would you believe?--sexy.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on July 20, 2008, 04:39:59 PM
I like her in PS too. I recently saw her on TCM in Woman of the Year (her first film with Tracy) and in some scenes she was actually--would you believe?--sexy.

Katharine Hepburn and sexy in the same sentence? :o That's not possible on any planet I'm familiar with... :-\

Have you seen Summertime Jenkins?


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 20, 2008, 05:05:11 PM
Nope.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on July 20, 2008, 05:27:01 PM
Given your ambivalence towards Mr. Lean, I don't know if I would recommend it to you on spec. But the fact that I actually sympathized with Hepburn's character, given my track record of wanting to throw her through a plate glass window, says a good deal in and of itself.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on July 20, 2008, 09:50:56 PM
Well, that's something. I've always avoided it because I (usually) can't stand Hepburn. I eventually want to see all of Lean's films, and was saving that one for last. I guess I can go ahead a see it, what?


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Groggy on July 21, 2008, 07:23:34 AM
I dunno, Jinkies. You and I have... disagreed before... :o


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on October 11, 2010, 09:14:54 AM
Blu-ray! http://www.blu-ray.com/news/?id=5276


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: dave jenkins on December 14, 2010, 07:38:12 AM
Blu-ray reviewed: http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/dvdreviews16/true_grit_dvd_review.htm


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Dust Devil on October 27, 2013, 10:21:01 AM
Eah, I just don't care for it, no matter how much I try. The language is the least of its problems. The acting's pretty good all around, I honestly enjoyed everybody's input, it's just that everything else seems second-hand. Notable exception being the horse-fight near the end: that was excellent indeed.


6/10


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Dust Devil on October 27, 2013, 10:21:57 AM
I've been chewing bits of it for the past 10 years maybe, seemed better that way.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on October 27, 2013, 08:51:27 PM
Eah, I just don't care for it, no matter how much I try. The language is the least of its problems. The acting's pretty good all around, I honestly enjoyed everybody's input, it's just that everything else seems second-hand. Notable exception being the horse-fight near the end: that was excellent indeed.


6/10

6/10 sounds about right


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: titoli on December 30, 2016, 03:17:30 PM
Rewatch. Nothing to add to my n.1 post.


Title: Re: True Grit (1969)
Post by: Moorman on January 04, 2017, 09:50:46 AM
I haven't seen either of the True Grit movies yet. Gonna watch the latest one very soon. O0