Sergio Leone Web Board

Films of Sergio Leone => The Good, The Bad and The Ugly => Topic started by: The clint on July 18, 2007, 04:00:11 AM



Title: Original intermission
Post by: The clint on July 18, 2007, 04:00:11 AM
I've read that an intermission was originally placed at the point after the dehidrated Blondie spills the coffee on Tuco's face and says something like "It's nice to know my good friend is watching over me." but the restored edition does not include the intermission. I think it should be included if it was part of the premiere version. Does anyone know if the Italian disc has it?


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: titoli on July 18, 2007, 06:30:32 AM
What was the intermission supposed to be made of?


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: moviesceleton on July 18, 2007, 08:19:54 AM
Are you sure that the intermission was "official" and not something that the theaters did by themselves?


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: Jordan Krug on July 18, 2007, 09:25:25 AM
I always find that on dvd's where they include the intermission (like on the recent re-release of the roadshow Sand pebbles, which also has like 3 minutes of black at the beginning with music) that it's pretty pointless for home viewing...I guess it's nice to have it for completeness, but usually it's a card that says "intermission" with music underneath for like 5 min....and I always fast forward.....it would make sense in a theatre, but I have the pause button on my remote for any kind of "intermission" I require....


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: dave jenkins on July 18, 2007, 09:42:55 AM
Are you sure that the intermission was "official" and not something that the theaters did by themselves?
I wonder the same thing myself. Does anybody know if GBU even had an intermission? (or BBC, for that matter).


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: moviesceleton on July 18, 2007, 09:57:56 AM
I wonder the same thing myself. Does anybody know if GBU even had an intermission? (or BBC, for that matter).
I think Frayling said on the commentary of FAFDM that even that film had an intermission in some theaters in Italy. Or am I remembering wrong?


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: dave jenkins on July 18, 2007, 10:21:27 AM
I think Frayling said on the commentary of FAFDM that even that film had an intermission in some theaters in Italy. Or am I remembering wrong?
I don't know. There are some countries where every film gets an intermission whether it needs one or not (this was true in New Zealand 10 years ago, I don't know about now). The projectionist comes to a reel change but turns the lights up instead. Everybody is thereby encouraged to patronize the concession stand. Then the movie starts again, but everyone's forgotten where they left off.

But this is very different from what we're talking about, an intermission planned for by the film's director.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: tucumcari bound on July 18, 2007, 10:49:04 AM
I wish films had intermission's today. It's all apart of the film going experience in my opinion. Everything is all about business today. They want to get you in, and get you out. I hate it! This is why I loved Grindhouse so much. It was old school.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: titoli on July 18, 2007, 12:27:17 PM
In Italy every movie was divided in 2, sometime 3 halves called "tempi" (fine del primo tempo/end of first half; secondo tempo/ second half were the legends on cards at the end and beginning of the two halves). During this intermission the lights go up and you buy refreshments by the seller who makes the rounds of the theatre like the one to be found in stadiums. More rarely there was a stand. I don't know how things stand today.
Until 10 years ago, mre or less, when programmed on TV channels, expeciallyh the public ones, the masters used to keep the original legends dividing the two halves. And it still happens with movies programmed at night. But for the rest they are cut in 4 or 5 pieces to accomodate commercials and the original cards are eliminated.       


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: Cusser on July 18, 2007, 12:54:22 PM
The first few times I saw GBU (1968-1970) in theaters (U.S.) it didn't have an intermission.  I saw it at theaters maybe 15 times, and only had intermission once or twice.  It occurred just after Tuco jumps onto the train, resumes with Blondie and Angel Eyes' men riding into the bombed town.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: dave jenkins on July 18, 2007, 01:30:47 PM
The intermission, then, was always in the same place?


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: cigar joe on July 18, 2007, 05:10:31 PM
I'm with Cusser, During the New York city premier in 1968 and subsequent viewings, I don't ever remember seeing intermissions for GBU.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: tucumcari bound on July 22, 2007, 01:16:09 PM
cigar. How often do they play Leone's films in NYC?


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: cigar joe on July 22, 2007, 07:38:23 PM
Quote
cigar. How often do they play Leone's films in NYC?

Do you mean now or then?

Then in the late 60's there were double bills on Times Square when the first two Dollars films came out, the after GBU they had triple bills of all three running back to back, on huge screens. Every summer for at least three years after they continued to do that adding Hang 'em High as a fourth film in the rotation to create a sort of linkage with the dollars films.

Now every couple of years they have some kind of Leone festival at a revival house or a museum.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: The clint on August 03, 2007, 10:28:47 AM
I know for sure that the International Export Version did not contain a planned intermission, I'm just wondering about the original Italian premiere version.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: cigar joe on August 03, 2007, 04:17:38 PM
It probably did, Frayling mentions that For a Few Dollars More's Italian cut had an internission


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: stamper on February 15, 2017, 01:15:50 AM
Hi guys, just noticed this thread. It's good to know that every Leone film had an intermission, at least in it's original form.

FOD happens around 50mn after Clint gets his money.

FOFDM is when Manco wants to go for a full night sleep. The music cuts abruptly because their was an intermission card there.

GBU I dunno but there was definetly one.

Same OUATITW

DYS I saw in the cinema with an intermission too, I remember I went for a pee. Forget where it was, I was a kid.

OUATIA of course had one, it's the same one that was on the original VHS tapes.

If you want a true Leone presentation, all those intermission cards needs to be put back in. They give a different feel to the films.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: Cusser on February 15, 2017, 07:12:24 AM
I saw all these in theaters as first run, except Once/America later in 1985 as it was put back into the Leone timing.  That was the only one that had intermission as first run.  But I did see GBU years later and there was an intermission just after Tuco cuts the chains and jumps on the train.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: titoli on February 15, 2017, 11:36:21 AM
It probably did, Frayling mentions that For a Few Dollars More's Italian cut had an internission

Until the '90's, if I remember well, ALL movies in the cinemas had an intermission. 


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: dave jenkins on February 15, 2017, 11:37:45 AM
Hi guys, just noticed this thread. It's good to know that every Leone film had an intermission, at least in it's original form.

FOD happens around 50mn after Clint gets his money.

FOFDM is when Manco wants to go for a full night sleep. The music cuts abruptly because their was an intermission card there.

GBU I dunno but there was definetly one.

Same OUATITW

DYS I saw in the cinema with an intermission too, I remember I went for a pee. Forget where it was, I was a kid.

OUATIA of course had one, it's the same one that was on the original VHS tapes.

If you want a true Leone presentation, all those intermission cards needs to be put back in. They give a different feel to the films.
Are you talking about the original US run for each film, or the Italian ones? Or both? I would be very surprised if the first run films in the US had intermissions (except for OUATIA, of course). Cusser's post seems to confirm that.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: dave jenkins on February 15, 2017, 11:42:45 AM
Until the '90's, if I remember well, ALL movies in the cinemas had an intermission. 
I assume you're talking about Italian cinemas. As someone who travelled a bit in the 90s I can confirm that in New Zealand and in Turkey films had intermissions in the 90s, whether they needed them or not (it helped sell concessions). Not so in Japan. The last theatrical showing of a film in US cinemas I remember seeing (again, not counting OUATIA) was for Barry Lyndon.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: Lil Brutto on February 15, 2017, 08:36:32 PM
But I did see GBU years later and there was an intermission just after Tuco cuts the chains and jumps on the train.

Interesting. I didn't know that the International Cut was presented with an intermission.

The Italian cut had the intermission during the monastery scene right after Blondie throws coffee in Tuco's face and says, " I'll sleep better...knowing that my worst enemy...is by my side...to protect me", and then passes out.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: Dust Devil on February 16, 2017, 06:11:56 AM
Until the '90's, if I remember well, ALL movies in the cinemas had an intermission. 

On TV it lasted for approx. 10 more years. Now it's worse: 95 min of movies and 25 min of commercials in 3 - 5 bus stops.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: titoli on February 16, 2017, 10:27:27 AM
On TV it lasted for approx. 10 more years. Now it's worse: 95 min of movies and 25 min of commercials in 3 - 5 bus stops.

That was the commercial TV. In RAI (the italian public service) until the '80's there was only one intermission usually at the same point as in the cinema,  the writing  "fine primo tempo" (end of first half) and "secondo tempo" (second half) on the celluloid were kept.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: stamper on February 17, 2017, 01:28:22 PM
I saw those intermissions in France. There were intermission cards there.

If there was no card, it's not real, it's theater decided intermission at random.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: Dust Devil on February 18, 2017, 09:00:03 AM
That was the commercial TV. In RAI (the italian public service) until the '80's there was only one intermission usually at the same point as in the cinema,  the writing  "fine primo tempo" (end of first half) and "secondo tempo" (second half) on the celluloid were kept.

Yeah I remember those, I grew up with them. It was a great way to show movies actually: you knew you can relax and enjoy the movie and that at some point you'll have the 15 mins to go to the toilette (or whatever) without losing a segment of the film.

Curious thing: I remember watching only one movie that had 2 intermissions, the last one being ''terzo tempo''. It was some sort of road movie or something similar and I remember it ended with a wide shot of a car leaving on a long white road in the desert or somewhere... I was never able to find out which movie it was, as I was relatively small and didn't remember much of it.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: Novecento on February 18, 2017, 10:02:34 AM
Not so in Japan....

If my memory serves me correctly, double-bills in Japan were a regular feature for much longer than in many other places. I suppose that doesn't leave much time for intermissions either.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: dave jenkins on February 18, 2017, 03:13:16 PM
If my memory serves me correctly, double-bills in Japan were a regular feature for much longer than in many other places. I suppose that doesn't leave much time for intermissions either.
That may be true. When I got to Japan (1989) there were no more double bills except for those in rep houses. It may be that the practice of double-billing set the pattern for intermission-free films, and that when they went to single bills there was no urgent need to re-introduce intermissions. Longer films such as 7 Samurai and Kwaidan must have had intermissions when they originally played.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: drinkanddestroy on March 11, 2017, 07:57:34 PM
I think Frayling said on the commentary of FAFDM that even that film had an intermission in some theaters in Italy. Or am I remembering wrong?

I remember in FAFDM, there is a moment where Blondie says, "Well  if there's going to be any shooting, then I'm going to have to get my rest," and then the screen fades to black. Seems a bit odd. On the commentary, Frayling says that there was an intermission in Italy at that point. He said films shown in Italian theaters had intermissions, so I guess that when Italians made movies - even ones that were not very long, like FAFDM - they always made a spot where there could be an intermission if desired.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: titoli on March 12, 2017, 04:52:49 AM
... so when Italians made movies - even ones that were not very long, like FAFDM - they always made a spot where there could be an intermission if desired.

As a rule the movie was divided in two equal halves and few, if any, distributors cared cared about where the intermission fell. Not even the audiences, actually.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: dave jenkins on March 12, 2017, 11:11:05 AM
As a rule the movie was divided in two equal halves and few, if any, distributors cared cared about where the intermission fell. Not even the audiences, actually.
Thus with cretini everywhere.


Title: Re: Original intermission
Post by: titoli on March 12, 2017, 11:12:13 AM
Two other features of the italian theatre policy in the years before multiplex worth mentioning were:

1) No numbered seats. Even in the most plushy theatres.
2) You could enter the theatre continuously, didn't have to wait for the end of the movie. You could also watch the movie standing waiting for people to leave their seats.