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Films of Sergio Leone => Other Films => Topic started by: cigar joe on November 04, 2007, 08:48:30 PM



Title: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: cigar joe on November 04, 2007, 08:48:30 PM
Dir Arthur Penn

starring:
Marlon Brando ...  Robert E. Lee Clayton
Jack Nicholson ...  Tom Logan
Randy Quaid ...  Little Tod
Kathleen Lloyd ...  Jane Braxton
Frederic Forrest ...  Cary
Harry Dean Stanton ...  Calvin


Watched a DVD of this Western today saw it in theaters in Montana when it first came out its entertaining and funny nothing more nothing less, Brando is great as the psycho "regulator" and Jack is well Jack, worth a look.


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: Tuco the ugly on November 04, 2007, 08:55:25 PM
Nothing special but definitely worth a look because of Brando and Nicholson.

''You know what that is? I cut you throat while you were sleeping...''

 O0


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: cigar joe on November 04, 2007, 10:02:35 PM
great sequence  O0


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: dave jenkins on January 03, 2009, 05:39:55 AM
As streaming video, here: http://www.hulu.com/watch/49756/the-missouri-breaks


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: Dust Devil on May 13, 2010, 12:00:00 PM
Watched this again today and for the first time enjoyed it from start to finish. There isn't much to the story, though the plot kinda tries to fool you in the first 1/3 of the movie that there might be more to it. However, it falls apart soon enough and Jack Nicholson and Marlon Brando take over. Brando comes off huge as the psycho poet-philosopher-regulator-hunter, or whatever he was. Over the top grotesquery but just fun to watch. This might be his best W. Hell I even could stand that voice of his.


7/10


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: Dust Devil on May 13, 2010, 12:05:47 PM
I wonder if Brando really did eat a live frog during the shooting of the movie.


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: dave jenkins on December 27, 2014, 08:50:50 AM
Just viewed the new BD, which has a pleasing image:
Quote
The Missouri Breaks (1976) - 7/10. 1080p. Nicholson is great, Harry Dean's haircut is fantastic, the girl, Kathleen Lloyd, is good, Randy Quaid doesn't die nearly early enough. Brando is nuts, of course, but no more eccentric than any run-of-the-mill character you'd find in a Coen Bros movie. The gang does some stupid things--if you know you've got a regulator to contend with, wouldn't you want to deal with him before you rustle the padrone's cattle? So those idiots got what they deserved then, the end.

I guess maybe this is the first time I realized the film doesn't take place in Missouri (yeah, I know, I'm a bit slow).


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: stanton on December 27, 2014, 09:02:47 AM
Just watched the DVD, which has a pretty bad image.

It's a good film, but could have been better, actually should have been better. Penn compared the filming with passionless sex. They worked hard on it, but he did not really believe in the film. And that sometime shows. Brando's over-acting is partly enjoyable, and partly conceptless. Despite several flaws I'm inconsequent enough to give The Missouri Breaks a 8/10

I'm just re-watching a lot of Penn's films, which was one of the best US director's in the 60s and 70s.


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: Moorman on February 28, 2017, 11:41:35 AM
Watched 2/3rds of this after someone recommended it.   2 out of 10...


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: mike siegel on February 28, 2017, 12:41:30 PM
Yeah, Penn knew it best, of course. I saw it 1979, in the 80s and 90s. Never cared for it. like most mid-/end-70s western. A missed opportunity,
the "best actors of their generations" combined.

He made some very good films indeed, I just worked on the French blu-ray for LITTLE BIG MAN (a splendid release, special edition - oversized book in slipcase), a great film. So is BONNIE & CLYDE of course. ALICES RESTAURANT, NIGHT MOVES, THE LEFT HANDED GUN, MIRACLE WORKER - all very good stuff... THE CHASE I didn't like much 30 years ago, but I think it works better now, in HD etc.


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: stanton on March 01, 2017, 02:43:57 AM
Yeah, Penn knew it best, of course. I saw it 1979, in the 80s and 90s. Never cared for it. like most mid-/end-70s western. A missed opportunity,
the "best actors of their generations" combined.

He made some very good films indeed, I just worked on the French blu-ray for LITTLE BIG MAN (a splendid release, special edition - oversized book in slipcase), a great film. So is BONNIE & CLYDE of course. ALICES RESTAURANT, NIGHT MOVES, THE LEFT HANDED GUN, MIRACLE WORKER - all very good stuff... THE CHASE I didn't like much 30 years ago, but I think it works better now, in HD etc.

Well, The Chase was not really his film, he did it, and he filmed all that stilted dialogues of the screenplay, but he always said that it was the producer's movie, who also did cut it.

Penn was such a talented director, but he probably wasn't asshole enough to win more than a few times in a Hollywood surrounding. But he took risks, and what counts is that he won with some of his films, while others could have been better for different reasons. Still even in his lesser films before the mid-80s there are at least examples of great filmmaking. Scenes other good directors were not able to make in their whole career.


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: mike siegel on March 01, 2017, 03:57:20 AM
Sure, a lot of Sam Spiegel's 60s films are dominated by him. Maybe he became too arrogant after the David Lean winners.
Certain scenes and the look are quite good, and all those terrific still photos of Jane Fonda who I love :).

In case you don't know the film yet: I provided my 16mm print of ARTHUR PENN ... THE DIRECTOR
for the French LITTLE BIG MAN blu-ray. A wonderful 25 minute documentary filmed on the set in 1970.


Title: Re: The Missouri Breaks (1976)
Post by: stanton on March 01, 2017, 05:08:35 AM


In case you don't know the film yet: I provided my 16mm print of ARTHUR PENN ... THE DIRECTOR
for the French LITTLE BIG MAN blu-ray. A wonderful 25 minute documentary filmed on the set in 1970.

I have watched all of Penn's films up to the mid 80s several times. His later films are a bit difficult to get, but most likely are also not that interesting.

I hope that one day the excellent German documentary Die Augen, das Licht, der Film will appear as bonus with one of his films.