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Films of Sergio Leone => Other Films => Topic started by: tucumcari bound on February 02, 2008, 03:22:15 PM



Title: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: tucumcari bound on February 02, 2008, 03:22:15 PM
One of director Michael Mann's finests. Easily among the best films of the 1990's. Bold. Passionate. Brilliantly excecuted early adventure/western romance.


(http://www.movieposter.com/posters/archive/main/24/A70-12282)


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: Groggy on February 02, 2008, 06:05:45 PM
Didn't really care for this one. 6/10


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: tucumcari bound on February 02, 2008, 06:15:47 PM
Didn't really care for this one. 6/10

Now, why am I not suprised Groggy.  ;)


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: Groggy on February 02, 2008, 09:09:26 PM
To be fair, I was half-asleep when I watched it.


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: tucumcari bound on February 02, 2008, 09:11:15 PM
To be fair, I was half-asleep when I watched it.

I'd say watch it again, but I know how long your must see list is so I won't bug you much. haha

I'd also like to point out the magnificent score by Trevor Jones and Randy Edelman. I think it's easily one of the best scores of all-time.


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: PowerRR on February 02, 2008, 11:20:58 PM
This is spot #2 on my Netflix queue right behind Nights of Cabiria. Can't wait to watch it.


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: Silenzio on February 02, 2008, 11:33:29 PM
This is a pretty good movie.  I learned some historically significant facts (for instance, Native Americans always die in slow motion).


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: Groggy on February 03, 2008, 01:39:07 AM
I'd say watch it again, but I know how long your must see list is so I won't bug you much. haha

I'd also like to point out the magnificent score by Trevor Jones and Randy Edelman. I think it's easily one of the best scores of all-time.

I also might add that we'd learned about the siege of Ft. William Henry in my history class a week or two before... therefore I may have been a bit more critical than I otherwise would have.


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: cigar joe on February 03, 2008, 05:45:11 AM
Yes the film takes liberty with the facts on both sides (both were at fault for the massacre at Ft. William Henry). But I like it also, and the score is good.


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: Ben Tyreen on February 03, 2008, 11:35:22 AM
  The last 15 minutes or so are some of the best ever from the point Hawkeye leaves the Huron village to the end credits.  So many cool scenes too, Hawkeye taking out the Indians trying to catch the courier, anything with Chingachgook is great, especially his all-purpose weapon, and Hawkeye's furious run through a gauntlet of Indians when he sees Cora in danger.  Really good movie overall  9/10.

  Not too bad of a score either. O0


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: tucumcari bound on February 03, 2008, 12:35:35 PM
  The last 15 minutes or so are some of the best ever from the point Hawkeye leaves the Huron village to the end credits.  So many cool scenes too, Hawkeye taking out the Indians trying to catch the courier, anything with Chingachgook is great, especially his all-purpose weapon, and Hawkeye's furious run through a gauntlet of Indians when he sees Cora in danger.  Really good movie overall  9/10.

  Not too bad of a score either. O0

Yes, there's countless classic moments. That's why I don't pay attention to some of the negativity here. This film is outstanding. How can anyone not love it?


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: Tuco the ugly on February 04, 2008, 07:52:28 AM
I'll have to (re)watch it one of these days, but I remember it was good.


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: tucumcari bound on February 04, 2008, 08:56:49 AM
I'll have to (re)watch it one of these days, but I remember it was good.

Yes you do! O0 I watched it again the other day and the film stays with you.


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on April 14, 2011, 02:03:38 AM
I started watching this movie a while ago; moved way too slowly for me and I shut it off a little while in... maybe I'll give it another shot (I am really impatient... working on that  ;))

btw, Revolutionary War-era films are Westerns now?   ;)


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: cigar joe on April 14, 2011, 05:58:49 AM
I started watching this movie a little while back; moved way too slowly for me and I shut it off a little while in... maybe I'll give it another shot (I am really impatient... working on that  ;))

btw, Revolutionary War-era films are Westerns now?   ;)

Technically it's the French & Indian War era.


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: dave jenkins on April 15, 2011, 08:32:32 PM
If we're gonna get technical, then I insist we refer to it as The Seven Years War era.

I watched this again recently and didn't like it. I'd forgotten how much of the film was given to the love story.


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: Jill on April 16, 2011, 05:35:50 AM
- Made Hawkeye too young. He's middle-aged in the book. Also, making him fall in love, WTF? It was Uncas who loved Cora, and even that was only hinted.
- Switched the roles of Alice and Cora. Or just their hair colours?
- Killed off Duncan (was it even him? seen ages ago), WTF?
- It was full of pointless carnage, hated it just like I hate Braveheart.
- Didn't have much to do with the book.

+Magua rocked.
+Chingachgook rocked.


? Will I ever see a book-faithful adaptation of my favourite Indian book?


Title: Re: The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
Post by: Spikeopath on May 18, 2017, 07:49:01 AM
Adding review to thread.

Death and honour are thought to be the same, but today I have learned that sometimes they are not.

The Last of the Mohicans is directed by Michael Mann who also co-adapts the screenplay with Christopher Crowe from James Fenimore Cooper's novel of the same name. It stars Daniel Day-Lewis, Madeleine Stowe, Russell Means, Eric Schweig, Jodhi May, Steven Waddington and Wes Studi. Music is scored by Trevor Jones and Randy Edelman and cinematography by Dante Spinotti.

1757 during the French and Indian War, Hawkeye (Lewis), a white man who was adopted by the Mohicans, finds himself on a perilous journey to escort a couple of British sisters to their father's fort. This journey brings him, and his companions, into conflict with Magua (Studi), a sadistic Huron warrior seeking revenge on the girls' father.

Inspired by the Randolph Scott film of the same name made in 1936, Michael Mann gives his all to create a stirring classical epic fit to sit in the company of the historical greats of old. Visually it's a treat of some magnitude, where aided by Spinotti, Mann frames his characters in the glorious vistas provided by the North Carolinas. For those with a bent for historical narratives, Mann's film also is not found wanting, in fact it's a cerebral delight. There's romantic strands that sit right in the colourful quilt, action expertly staged and handled by the talented director and the cast, led by a superbly athletic and serious Day-Lewis, are impressive and doing justice to the requisite characters written on the page, and the musical score enhances mood with swirling beauty coupling with primitive potency that wraps itself snugly around the story.

Mann gets all the key ingredients right, but it's his ability to balance the human drama with the energised action that is most impressive. The film is also thankfully devoid of boorish filler, this is a troubled time in history, with much political activity and complex racial manoeuvres, but Mann doesn't need to fill the screen with political posturing and drawn out speeches. We know all we need to know about the period in question, but the story is kept intimate, the focus on a small group of people, of whose fate we most assuredly have interest in. While on the edges of the frame we know we are witnessing the death of an era, for better or worse on different sides of the coin. Also pays to note that Mann's well known penchant for the meticulous is evident as well, for he details the native characters with considerable care.

It's not flawless, accents fluctuate, the odd fake look slips into the production design and the director does what many American directors do, they come dangerously close to caricaturing their British officers, but this is still great heroic escapism tinged with romanticism. Something for everyone who loves classical cinema in fact. 9/10