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General Information => General Discussion => Topic started by: cigar joe on July 16, 2008, 10:58:37 PM



Title: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on July 16, 2008, 10:58:37 PM
I was watching episodes of the old "Wild Wild West" the other day, most of the episodes if not all are supposed to take place during the Grant administration, the series being basically James Bond in the West makes use of all sorts of gadgets and is very free with anachronisims. That said some episodes are very entertaining reguardless of their ridiculousness.

Anyway for you aspiring Western novel or screenplay authors here is a chronology of some modern archetypes. Add more if you can think of any.

1830's Gaslights, towns with central manufactured gas plants begin to appear and spread to the West. Open flame type (mantles didn't appear until the turn of the century) I've seen pictures of the Leavenworth Kansas in 1867 with a large Gas tank along the Missouri waterfront.

1856 Kerosene Lamps early ones were dead flame type in 1868 the developement of hot blast & cold blast improved the brightness of the flame.

1851 Telegraph long distance lines began appearing after 1851.

1871 Steamcars

1880 Electric power lighting systems began to replace gaslights.

1885 Telephone long distance networks began to spread out from the East and major cities in the US.

1892 Phonographs tin foil cylinder type,  Graphophones wax cylinder type sold for $150, by 1899 for $20 with a small version called the "gem" for $7.50.

1895 The Gramophone record type player, by 1901 mass produced.

1900 internal combustion Gas autos


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: Groggy on July 17, 2008, 06:22:27 AM
How about...

Colt Revolver - 1836

Colt .45 Peacemaker - 1873 (hear that, Sergio?)

Repeating rifles - 1860

Machine guns - 1862 (weren't in wide use until several years after the Civil War however)

Pump-action shotguns - 1893

Dynamite - 1867


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on July 17, 2008, 07:07:58 AM
I purposely left out the firearms since we've already gone over it in past posts.  :)

Quote
Colt .45 Peacemaker - 1873 (hear that, Sergio?)

Why hear that Sergio?, For A Few Dollars More took place post 1873 or later, A Fistful of Dollars in late 1890's, what's the problem?


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: Groggy on July 17, 2008, 07:21:41 AM
I purposely left out the firearms since we've already gone over it in past posts.  :)

Why hear that Sergio?, For A Few Dollars More took place in 1873, A Fistful of Dollars in late 1890's, what's the problem?

Whoa, whoa, whoa! When did we determine that?

I was thinking of Clint in GBU. Perhaps I was confused about the metal cartridges?


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on July 17, 2008, 07:32:33 AM
Quote
Whoa, whoa, whoa! When did we determine that?


Newspaper that Mortimer looks at in FAFDM is 1873.

and

"In 1856 Smith & Wesson formed their second partnership to produce a small revolver designed to fire the Rimfire cartridge they patented in August of 1854. This revolver was the first successful fully self-contained cartridge revolver available in the world. Smith & Wesson secured patents for the revolver to prevent other manufacturers from producing a cartridge revolver - giving the young company a very lucrative business."

" the first Henry rifles were in the hands of Union soldiers by mid 1862. Due to its revolutionary design and rapid rate of fire, the Henry quickly found popularity both with the military and civilian purchasers. Early sales were especially brisk in Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri and Indiana.
With its reliable .44 caliber rimfire metallic cartridge, the Henry produced a rapid and highly accurate fire."

Illeagal Colt conversions were made using rimfire cartridges from either Henry or Smith & Wesson, we covered the various conversions in a thread called "Blondie's Gun" in GBU section.





Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: Groggy on July 17, 2008, 07:36:42 AM
Newspaper that Mortimer looks at in FAFDM is 1873.

Not really evidence of anything, except that the event Mortimer's looking at took place then. It could be anytime within a few years of that date.

I will concede to you the gun point.


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on July 17, 2008, 07:42:05 AM
Well all it has to say is 1873 right,  if it said 1872 there wouldn't be any Peacemakers, but the article Mortimer reads about is the White Rocks shooting I believe so it could be at the latest 1874.


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: Groggy on July 17, 2008, 07:47:12 AM
True, but it's an archive of old newspaper articles, isn't it?

I don't think, if the article was written in 1873, that the movie could take place before that date. :D


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on July 17, 2008, 07:56:31 AM

Quote
I don't think, if the article was written in 1873, that the movie could take place before that date.


Agreed that's what I'm saying, but now that we brought that up............ he's looking at archived articles in a binder as you say,  now we need screen caps of that to see where in the binder he's looking if its in the middle its a while ago, if hes at the end of the binder then its more recent, we may have a time jump here in FAFDM


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: noodles_leone on July 17, 2008, 09:57:34 AM
I purposely left out the firearms since we've already gone over it in past posts.  :)

Why hear that Sergio?, For A Few Dollars More took place in 1873, A Fistful of Dollars in late 1890's, what's the problem?

What about OUATITW, which is full of peacemakers ? i've read somewhere that the movie is supposed to take place in the early 1870's, if not sooner (i suppose the guy based his conclusions on the railroad history... but he (and I) could be wrong)? THe guy also added that peacemakers were not widly used before 1976. THe point is, in OUATITW, they are widly used.

Great topic, by the way, Cigar!


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on July 17, 2008, 10:48:33 AM
I don't think its supposed to be the first Transcontinental RR but based on the other transcontinentals the Southern Pacific & the Santa Fe RR's in fact the Santa Fe was originally concieved as the Atlantic & Pacific RR (coincidently Morton's RR is the Atlantic & Pacific)

See below the route map with the A&P name


(http://img440.imageshack.us/img440/5687/aprrtitlezi1.jpg)

and here for the link to the full map on the topic page:

http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=4166.0



My guess is that OUTITW is in the  mid to late 1880's so Colt Peacemakers would definitely be around.


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: noodles_leone on July 17, 2008, 11:18:26 AM
Ehe, great work CJ, as usual.

BTW, the mid to late 1880's seems to be the perfect period for the themes of the movie (short befor the frontiere was closed).


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: dave jenkins on July 24, 2008, 04:46:49 PM
I don't think its supposed to be the first Transcontinental RR but based on the other transcontinentals the Southern Pacific & the Santa Fe RR's in fact the Santa Fe was originally concieved as the Atlantic & Pacific RR (coincidently Morton's RR is the Atlantic & Pacific)

See below the route map with the A&P name


(http://img440.imageshack.us/img440/5687/aprrtitlezi1.jpg)

and here for the link to the full map on the topic page:

http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=4166.0

My guess is that OUTITW is in the  mid to late 1880's so Colt Peacemakers would definitely be around.
But Morton's RR is a single-owner operated concern, with a really strange (and impractical) scheme: build all new track (no tie-ins with existing RRs), from one direction only, east to west. As nothing like this ever happened, what we are dealing with is alt history, a form of science fiction. 1880-something might be a good date to settle on, but 1980 or 2080 might be equally plausible. :D


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on July 24, 2008, 06:02:42 PM
Actually I believe  the Southern Pacific was built in one direction West to East, but yes there was no singal owner operated Transcontinental RR.


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on August 11, 2008, 09:03:43 PM
Updates

1812 tinplate canned goods began to be manufactured, in the West in the 1800's were refferd to as "airtights".

1830's Gaslights, towns with central manufactured gas plants begin to appear and spread to the West. Open flame type (mantles didn't appear until the turn of the century) I've seen pictures of the Leavenworth Kansas in 1867 with a large Gas tank along the Missouri waterfront.

1836 in the United States, Alonzo D. Phillips of Springfield, Massachusetts, obtained a patent for "manufacturing of friction matches" and called them locofocos. The danger problem was not resolved until the invention of amorphous (red) phosphorus in 1845. Carl Lundstrom of Sweden introduced the first red phosphorus "safety" matches in 1855. Joshua Pusey invented book matches in 1889.  He was a well-known lawyer in Pennsylvania before the turn of the century. He smoked cigars. 

1856 Kerosene Lamps early ones were dead flame type in 1868 the developement of hot blast & cold blast improved the brightness of the flame.

1851 Telegraph long distance lines began appering after 1851.

1871 Steamcars

1880 Electric power lighting systems began to replace gaslights.

1885 Telephone long distance networks began to spread out from the East and major cities in the US.

1892 Phonographs tin foil cylinder type,  Graphophones wax cylinder type sold for $150, by 1899 for $20 with a small version called the "gem" for $7.50.

1895 The Gramophone record type player, by 1901 mass produced.

1900 internal combustion Gas autos


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: dave jenkins on August 11, 2008, 10:59:49 PM
Once again, CJ:  O0 O0 O0


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on November 27, 2009, 08:46:54 AM
Updates

1812 tinplate canned goods began to be manufactured, in the West in the 1800's were referred to as "airtights".

1830's Gaslights, towns with central manufactured gas plants begin to appear and spread to the West. Open flame type (mantles didn't appear until the turn of the century) I've seen pictures of the Leavenworth Kansas in 1867 with a large Gas tank along the Missouri waterfront.

1836 in the United States, Alonzo D. Phillips of Springfield, Massachusetts, obtained a patent for "manufacturing of friction matches" and called them locofocos. The danger problem was not resolved until the invention of amorphous (red) phosphorus in 1845. Carl Lundstrom of Sweden introduced the first red phosphorus "safety" matches in 1855. Joshua Pusey invented book matches in 1889.  He was a well-known lawyer in Pennsylvania before the turn of the century. He smoked cigars.

1856 Kerosene Lamps early ones were dead flame type in 1868 the development of hot blast & cold blast improved the brightness of the flame.

1851 Telegraph long distance lines began appearing after 1851.

1860's The first ceiling fans appeared in the 1860s and 1870s, in the United States. At that time, they were not powered by any form of electric motor. Instead, a stream of running water was used, in conjunction with a turbine, to drive a system of belts which would turn the blades of two-blade fan units. These systems could accommodate several fan units, and so became popular in stores, restaurants, and offices. Some of these systems still survive today, and can be seen in parts of the southern United States where they originally proved useful.

1865 Kerosene & Alcohol Powered fans (Lake Breeze Motor Company 1865-1915)

1871 Steamcars

1880 Electric power lighting systems began to replace gaslights.

1882 The electrically-powered ceiling fan was invented in 1882 by Philip Diehl (pronounced the same as "deal"). Diehl had engineered the electric motor used in the first Singer sewing machines, and in 1882 adapted that motor for use in a ceiling-mounted fan. "The Diehl Electric Fan", as it was known, operated like a common modern-day ceiling fan; each fan had its own self-contained motor unit, eliminating the need for costly and bulky belt systems.

1885 Telephone long distance networks began to spread out from the East and major cities in the US.

1892 Phonographs tin foil cylinder type,  Graphophones wax cylinder type sold for $150, by 1899 for $20 with a small version called the "gem" for $7.50.

1895 The Gramophone record type player, by 1901 mass produced.

1900 internal combustion Gas autos



Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: stoicamerican on November 29, 2009, 02:34:56 PM
When I saw this topic, at first I thought you meant archetypes in the C.G. Jung sense. I was gonna talk about Clint Eastwood's character as the supreme archetypal example of the silent, lone wolf type of gunslinger (really this mode for characters in westerns began with Eastwood's portrayal).
But I guess you guys are talking more about recurring objects and imagery.
I don't even know why I'm posting this.  :(


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on November 29, 2009, 09:14:26 PM
Its just a guide, if you were to write a Western novel or screenplay set at a certain date you have a guide for the various archetypes what you can and cannot use.


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: stoicamerican on November 30, 2009, 12:36:16 PM
Its just a guide, if you were to write a Western novel or screenplay set at a certain date you have a guide for the various archetypes what you can and cannot use.

Yeah I'm not criticizing this. It's definitely an interesting list.


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: noodles_leone on November 30, 2009, 01:02:32 PM
By the way, Stoicamerican, you could start your own toping and talk about eastwood as a new kind of archetypes :)
There may already be a topic like that somewhere though.


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on May 12, 2010, 03:28:25 PM
Updates

1812 tinplate canned goods began to be manufactured, in the West in the 1800's were referred to as "airtights".

1830's Gaslights, towns with central manufactured gas plants begin to appear and spread to the West. Open flame type (mantles didn't appear until the turn of the century) I've seen pictures of the Leavenworth Kansas in 1867 with a large Gas tank along the Missouri waterfront.

1836 in the United States, Alonzo D. Phillips of Springfield, Massachusetts, obtained a patent for "manufacturing of friction matches" and called them locofocos. The danger problem was not resolved until the invention of amorphous (red) phosphorus in 1845. Carl Lundstrom of Sweden introduced the first red phosphorus "safety" matches in 1855. Joshua Pusey invented book matches in 1889.  He was a well-known lawyer in Pennsylvania before the turn of the century. He smoked cigars.

1856 Kerosene Lamps early ones were dead flame type in 1868 the development of hot blast & cold blast improved the brightness of the flame.

1851 Telegraph long distance lines began appearing after 1851.

1860's The first ceiling fans appeared in the 1860s and 1870s, in the United States. At that time, they were not powered by any form of electric motor. Instead, a stream of running water was used, in conjunction with a turbine, to drive a system of belts which would turn the blades of two-blade fan units. These systems could accommodate several fan units, and so became popular in stores, restaurants, and offices. Some of these systems still survive today, and can be seen in parts of the southern United States where they originally proved useful.

1865 Kerosene & Alcohol Powered fans (Lake Breeze Motor Company 1865-1915)

1871 Steamcars

1880 Electric power lighting systems began to replace gaslights.

 1880 The practice of illustrating news stories with photographs was made possible by printing and photography innovations that occurred between 1880 and 1897. While newsworthy events were photographed as early as the 1850s, printing presses could only publish from engravings  until the 1880s. Early news photographs required that photos be re-interpreted by an engraver before they could be published.

1882 The electrically-powered ceiling fan was invented in 1882 by Philip Diehl (pronounced the same as "deal"). Diehl had engineered the electric motor used in the first Singer sewing machines, and in 1882 adapted that motor for use in a ceiling-mounted fan. "The Diehl Electric Fan", as it was known, operated like a common modern-day ceiling fan; each fan had its own self-contained motor unit, eliminating the need for costly and bulky belt systems.

1885 Telephone long distance networks began to spread out from the East and major cities in the US.

1892 Phonographs tin foil cylinder type,  Graphophones wax cylinder type sold for $150, by 1899 for $20 with a small version called the "gem" for $7.50.

1895 The Gramophone record type player, by 1901 mass produced.

1900 internal combustion Gas autos


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on April 03, 2011, 04:34:38 AM
Updates

1812 tinplate canned goods began to be manufactured, in the West in the 1800's were referred to as "airtights".

1829 Tremont Hotel in Boston was the first hotel to have indoor plumbing and became the prototype of a modern, first - class American hotel.

1830's Gaslights, towns with central manufactured gas plants begin to appear and spread to the West. Open flame type (mantles didn't appear until the turn of the century) I've seen pictures of the Leavenworth Kansas in 1867 with a large Gas tank along the Missouri waterfront.

1830s, at least one private house, a James River mansion, had a wood-fired hot air heating system. Heat wafted up to the first floor via handsome brass registers. Ladies of New York City's High Society wasted no time in flocking to the parlor after dinner to stand over its registers for warmth.

1836 in the United States, Alonzo D. Phillips of Springfield, Massachusetts, obtained a patent for "manufacturing of friction matches" and called them locofocos. The danger problem was not resolved until the invention of amorphous (red) phosphorus in 1845. Carl Lundstrom of Sweden introduced the first red phosphorus "safety" matches in 1855. Joshua Pusey invented book matches in 1889.  He was a well-known lawyer in Pennsylvania before the turn of the century. He smoked cigars.

1856 Kerosene Lamps early ones were dead flame type in 1868 the development of hot blast & cold blast improved the brightness of the flame.

1851 Telegraph long distance lines began appearing after 1851.

1860's The first ceiling fans appeared in the 1860s and 1870s, in the United States. At that time, they were not powered by any form of electric motor. Instead, a stream of running water was used, in conjunction with a turbine, to drive a system of belts which would turn the blades of two-blade fan units. These systems could accommodate several fan units, and so became popular in stores, restaurants, and offices. Some of these systems still survive today, and can be seen in parts of the southern United States where they originally proved useful.

1865 Kerosene & Alcohol Powered fans (Lake Breeze Motor Company 1865-1915)

1871 Steamcars

1880 Electric power lighting systems began to replace gaslights.

1880 The practice of illustrating news stories with photographs was made possible by printing and photography innovations that occurred between 1880 and 1897. While newsworthy events were photographed as early as the 1850s, printing presses could only publish from engravings  until the 1880s. Early news photographs required that photos be re-interpreted by an engraver before they could be published.

1882 The electrically-powered ceiling fan was invented in 1882 by Philip Diehl (pronounced the same as "deal"). Diehl had engineered the electric motor used in the first Singer sewing machines, and in 1882 adapted that motor for use in a ceiling-mounted fan. "The Diehl Electric Fan", as it was known, operated like a common modern-day ceiling fan; each fan had its own self-contained motor unit, eliminating the need for costly and bulky belt systems.

1885 Telephone long distance networks began to spread out from the East and major cities in the US.

1892 Phonographs tin foil cylinder type,  Graphophones wax cylinder type sold for $150, by 1899 for $20 with a small version called the "gem" for $7.50.

1895 The Gramophone record type player, by 1901 mass produced.

1900 internal combustion Gas autos

1915, the familiar U.S. curbside mailbox with its curved, tunnel-shape top (to prevent water and snow collection), latching door, and movable signal flag was designed by U.S. Post Office employee Roy J. Joroleman. With the introduction of rural free delivery (RFD) by the U.S. Post Office in 1896, and in Canada in 1908, ranchers, farmers and rural homeowners at first resisted the purchase of dedicated mailboxes, often using old boots, empty bushel baskets, tins, and wooden boxes in which to collect their mail.


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on August 19, 2011, 04:23:47 PM
Updates

1812 tinplate canned goods began to be manufactured, in the West in the 1800's were referred to as "airtights".

1829 Tremont Hotel in Boston was the first hotel to have indoor plumbing and became the prototype of a modern, first - class American hotel.

1830's Gaslights, towns with central manufactured gas plants begin to appear and spread to the West. Open flame type (mantles didn't appear until the turn of the century) I've seen pictures of the Leavenworth Kansas in 1867 with a large Gas tank along the Missouri waterfront.

1830s, at least one private house, a James River mansion, had a wood-fired hot air heating system. Heat wafted up to the first floor via handsome brass registers. Ladies of New York City's High Society wasted no time in flocking to the parlor after dinner to stand over its registers for warmth.

1836 in the United States, Alonzo D. Phillips of Springfield, Massachusetts, obtained a patent for "manufacturing of friction matches" and called them locofocos. The danger problem was not resolved until the invention of amorphous (red) phosphorus in 1845. Carl Lundstrom of Sweden introduced the first red phosphorus "safety" matches in 1855. Joshua Pusey invented book matches in 1889.  He was a well-known lawyer in Pennsylvania before the turn of the century. He smoked cigars.

1856 Kerosene Lamps early ones were dead flame type in 1868 the development of hot blast & cold blast improved the brightness of the flame.

1851 Telegraph long distance lines began appearing after 1851.

1860's The first ceiling fans appeared in the 1860s and 1870s, in the United States. At that time, they were not powered by any form of electric motor. Instead, a stream of running water was used, in conjunction with a turbine, to drive a system of belts which would turn the blades of two-blade fan units. These systems could accommodate several fan units, and so became popular in stores, restaurants, and offices. Some of these systems still survive today, and can be seen in parts of the southern United States where they originally proved useful.

1861-Grain Elevators almost every fly spec in Eastern Montana has one so I thought I'd check them out here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armour%27s_Warehouse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armour%27s_Warehouse)) is one from 1861 that looks like some of the relics I saw on my trip through Montana which probably post date to the building of the Great Nothern RR 1889-1893

1865 Kerosene & Alcohol Powered fans (Lake Breeze Motor Company 1865-1915)

1871 Steamcars

1880 Electric power lighting systems began to replace gaslights.

1880 The practice of illustrating news stories with photographs was made possible by printing and photography innovations that occurred between 1880 and 1897. While newsworthy events were photographed as early as the 1850s, printing presses could only publish from engravings  until the 1880s. Early news photographs required that photos be re-interpreted by an engraver before they could be published.

1882 The electrically-powered ceiling fan was invented in 1882 by Philip Diehl (pronounced the same as "deal"). Diehl had engineered the electric motor used in the first Singer sewing machines, and in 1882 adapted that motor for use in a ceiling-mounted fan. "The Diehl Electric Fan", as it was known, operated like a common modern-day ceiling fan; each fan had its own self-contained motor unit, eliminating the need for costly and bulky belt systems.

1885 Telephone long distance networks began to spread out from the East and major cities in the US.

1892 Phonographs tin foil cylinder type,  Graphophones wax cylinder type sold for $150, by 1899 for $20 with a small version called the "gem" for $7.50.

1895 The Gramophone record type player, by 1901 mass produced.

1900 internal combustion Gas autos

1915, the familiar U.S. curbside mailbox with its curved, tunnel-shape top (to prevent water and snow collection), latching door, and movable signal flag was designed by U.S. Post Office employee Roy J. Joroleman. With the introduction of rural free delivery (RFD) by the U.S. Post Office in 1896, and in Canada in 1908, ranchers, farmers and rural homeowners at first resisted the purchase of dedicated mailboxes, often using old boots, empty bushel baskets, tins, and wooden boxes in which to collect their mail.


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on October 04, 2012, 05:37:35 AM
Updates

1812 tinplate canned goods began to be manufactured, in the West in the 1800's were referred to as "airtights".

1829 Tremont Hotel in Boston was the first hotel to have indoor plumbing and became the prototype of a modern, first - class American hotel.

1830's Gaslights, towns with central manufactured gas plants begin to appear and spread to the West. Open flame type (mantles didn't appear until the turn of the century) I've seen pictures of the Leavenworth Kansas in 1867 with a large Gas tank along the Missouri waterfront.

1830s, at least one private house, a James River mansion, had a wood-fired hot air heating system. Heat wafted up to the first floor via handsome brass registers. Ladies of New York City's High Society wasted no time in flocking to the parlor after dinner to stand over its registers for warmth.

1836 in the United States, Alonzo D. Phillips of Springfield, Massachusetts, obtained a patent for "manufacturing of friction matches" and called them locofocos. The danger problem was not resolved until the invention of amorphous (red) phosphorus in 1845. Carl Lundstrom of Sweden introduced the first red phosphorus "safety" matches in 1855. Joshua Pusey invented book matches in 1889.  He was a well-known lawyer in Pennsylvania before the turn of the century. He smoked cigars.

1856 Kerosene Lamps early ones were dead flame type in 1868 the development of hot blast & cold blast improved the brightness of the flame.

1851 Telegraph long distance lines began appearing after 1851.

1854 The farm wind pump was invented by Daniel Halladay in 1854.[26][27] In early California and some other states the windmill was part of a self-contained domestic water system including a hand-dug well and a redwood water tower supporting a redwood tank and enclosed by redwood siding (tankhouse). Eventually steel blades and steel towers replaced wooden construction, and at their peak in 1930, an estimated 600,000 units were in use.[28] The multi-bladed wind turbineatop a lattice tower made of wood or steel hence became, for many years, a fixture of the landscape throughout rural America. Firms such as Star, Eclipse,Fairbanks-Morse and Aermotor became famed suppliers in North and South America.

1860's The first ceiling fans appeared in the 1860s and 1870s, in the United States. At that time, they were not powered by any form of electric motor. Instead, a stream of running water was used, in conjunction with a turbine, to drive a system of belts which would turn the blades of two-blade fan units. These systems could accommodate several fan units, and so became popular in stores, restaurants, and offices. Some of these systems still survive today, and can be seen in parts of the southern United States where they originally proved useful.

1861-Grain Elevators almost every fly spec in Eastern Montana has one so I thought I'd check them out here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armour%27s_Warehouse) is one from 1861 that looks like some of the relics I saw on my trip through Montana which probably post date to the building of the Great Nothern RR 1889-1893

1865 Kerosene & Alcohol Powered fans (Lake Breeze Motor Company 1865-1915)

1871 Steamcars

1880 Electric power lighting systems began to replace gaslights.

1880 The practice of illustrating news stories with photographs was made possible by printing and photography innovations that occurred between 1880 and 1897. While newsworthy events were photographed as early as the 1850s, printing presses could only publish from engravings  until the 1880s. Early news photographs required that photos be re-interpreted by an engraver before they could be published.

1882 The electrically-powered ceiling fan was invented in 1882 by Philip Diehl (pronounced the same as "deal"). Diehl had engineered the electric motor used in the first Singer sewing machines, and in 1882 adapted that motor for use in a ceiling-mounted fan. "The Diehl Electric Fan", as it was known, operated like a common modern-day ceiling fan; each fan had its own self-contained motor unit, eliminating the need for costly and bulky belt systems.

1885 Telephone long distance networks began to spread out from the East and major cities in the US.

1892 Phonographs tin foil cylinder type,  Graphophones wax cylinder type sold for $150, by 1899 for $20 with a small version called the "gem" for $7.50.

1895 The Gramophone record type player, by 1901 mass produced.

1900 internal combustion Gas autos

1915, the familiar U.S. curbside mailbox with its curved, tunnel-shape top (to prevent water and snow collection), latching door, and movable signal flag was designed by U.S. Post Office employee Roy J. Joroleman. With the introduction of rural free delivery (RFD) by the U.S. Post Office in 1896, and in Canada in 1908, ranchers, farmers and rural homeowners at first resisted the purchase of dedicated mailboxes, often using old boots, empty bushel baskets, tins, and wooden boxes in which to collect their mail.


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: Groggy on January 08, 2013, 07:43:31 AM
Sorry I missed this thread CJ. Lots of cool stuff here, keep it coming. O0


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: Tex on February 26, 2013, 10:22:37 AM

 1880 The practice of illustrating news stories with photographs was made possible by printing and photography innovations that occurred between 1880 and 1897. While newsworthy events were photographed as early as the 1850s, printing presses could only publish from engravings  until the 1880s. Early news photographs required that photos be re-interpreted by an engraver before they could be published.


Does this date FFDM even later than the 1870s then? That newspaper research Mortimer does on Manco includes a printed photograph. It sure doesn't look like an engraving.

Note: I surely don't mean to nit pick the movie apart, finding inaccuracies. Assuming Leone had his chronological ducks in a row, I'm hoping to date the story more accurately.

Great stuff, Joe!  O0


Title: Re: Chronology of modern archetypes appearing in Westerns
Post by: cigar joe on February 26, 2013, 02:39:13 PM
We decided that Monco's image was a conceit ( i.e. an extravagant, fanciful, and elaborate construction) but Indio's wanted poster wouldn't be and that the fact that railroads are in both El Paso and Tucumcari pushes the film to the turn of the century.

There is a whole thread on this  ;)