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Films of Sergio Leone => Other Films => Topic started by: titoli on August 17, 2008, 11:48:58 AM



Title: The Man From The Alamo (1953)
Post by: titoli on August 17, 2008, 11:48:58 AM
An early Boetticher effort, this is worth watching in spite of the apparent budget limitations. I like the way Ford doesn't go around trying to justify his behaviour. I like less the part in which he joins the gang of bandits which killed his family. The final chase is breathtaking and I give this a full 7\10.


Title: Re: The Man From The Alamo (1953)
Post by: Ben Tyreen on August 17, 2008, 02:23:12 PM
 I agree with your review, titoli.  An above average B-western for sure with a decent performance from Glenn Ford.  The set of the Alamo is pretty ridiculous, the defenders are basically in one box, but it does provide a good jumping off point for the rest of the story.  Worth mentioning is Chill Wills who seven years later would star in another Alamo movie with a slightly bigger budget, John Wayne's The Alamo. ;)


Title: Re: The Man From The Alamo (1953)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on March 31, 2014, 12:42:31 PM
I just saw this, I liked the ending, the action sequences are good, but overall this is not a very good movie. I give it a 6.5/10


Title: Re: The Man From The Alamo (1953)
Post by: Spikeopath on May 29, 2017, 11:57:58 AM
He's just an unlucky guy.

As the war for Texas independence heightens, the Alamo has become a critical point of time buying interest. Fearing their families will perish under the might of the marauding Mexican army, the men of the Alamo draw lots to see which one of them will flee the Alamo battle to steer the respective families out of harms way. John Stroud is the man faced with the task, but upon reaching his destinations he finds he's too late to save anyone. However, this is just the start of his worries as he finds he has been branded a coward for leaving the Alamo, where all have now perished; while his attempts to avenge the murder of his family are beset with problems at every turn.

In truth, no great shakes in the Western genre here, and certainly not even close to being amongst the better work of director Budd Boetticher (The Tall T & Comanche Station) or Glenn Ford (The Big Heat & Blackboard Jungle). It's also not high on production value and doesn't have location vitality to give it an earthy sheen, it still, however, manages to be an entertaining piece putting an interesting offshoot to the Alamo legend. Glenn Ford is a watchable star at the best of times and he manages to keep this picture afloat by putting a bit of cool bravado urgency into the role of John Stroud, with dashes of emotional fortitude, his relationship with the young, recently orphaned Carlos, gives the film its emotional weight, and when that sits alongside the usual array of shoot them up sequences it makes for good honest Western fare.

Of the supporting cast, Chill Wills and Neville Brand put in some fine work, while there has been far far worse female leads in this genre than the radiant Julie Adams. Of Boetticher's direction? It's just about adequate, where working within the confines of the lot and it's lowly budget origins, he manages to pull it thru; but in truth probably himself cringed at some of the final night time sequences in the cut. He of course, a couple of years down the line, would go on to direct some of the best genre pieces on the market, so he owes the genre fan very little all told. So good and bad here folks, with the good far outweighing the technically bad deficiencies on offer. But I mean come on now, if you can't enjoy Ford having a good old punch up on the brink of a waterfall? Well you're probably better off not watching a 50s B movie Western in the first place then. 6.5/10