Sergio Leone Web Board

Films of Sergio Leone => Other Films => Topic started by: titoli on November 28, 2008, 11:09:17 AM



Title: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: titoli on November 28, 2008, 11:09:17 AM
I don't know if the original colours are those of the dvd release, but they make you wonder why movies are not shot nowadays with such a flamboyant photography, steering generally instead toward monochromy. This is almost perfect, were it not for the parts involving the minor characters (sorry, but I can't put up with Carey jr, Ugly Natwick and the cheap love story plot). McLaglen is better than usual, still I'd prefer he weren't there. Unrivalled (maybe by Ford himself: I should watch it back to back with The Searchers) in locations and shots. And even concentrating not so much on violent action is an asset. Score embarassing (except for the title song). To be seen in a theatre. 8\10


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: dave jenkins on November 28, 2008, 03:33:12 PM
I don't know if the original colours are those of the dvd release, but they make you wonder why movies are not shot nowadays with such a flamboyant photography, steering generally instead toward monochromy.
The short answer is that 3-strip Technicolor is a lost process. Eastmancolor, which replaced it, is more monochromatic. Of course, with computers you can probably generate any colors you want, so the true answer to your question may be money.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: titoli on November 28, 2008, 04:42:28 PM
I think it is rather a matter of style. There was a first veering toward monochromaticism in the '70's, and it suited many of the movies made at the time, expecially those dealing with urban realities. In the '90's that became the rule, with movies though that didn't warrant such an option. Probably somebody thought that that could be the only concession hollywood could make to realism.



Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: Groggy on November 29, 2008, 08:58:28 AM
I remember liking this though it's been many years since I've seen it. Fort Apache is the best of the cavalry trilogy with maturity, intelligence and a great Frank-esque performance by Henry Fonda, this movie slightly less good (the John Agar-Joanne Dru subplot is silly) but still entertaining, Rio Grande a complete mediocrity.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: Groggy on July 12, 2010, 06:37:53 PM
I stick roughly by my comments above.

I wrote a double-barrelled review of this and Sergeant Rutledge, so either bear with me or skip over these threads.

Quote
Ford's follow-up to Fort Apache (1948) lacks that work's thematic depth and complexity, but is a wortwhile picture in its own right. She Wore a Yellow Ribbon is a fine hymn to the US military and one of the most visually-spectacular Westerns ever. Its minor faults do not seriously harm a mostly enjoyable film.

Captain Nathan Brittles (John Wayne) is a few days away from retirement, but events elsewhere throw a spanner in the works. Custer's 7th Cavalry has recently been massacred, and Indians all over the West are uniting in preparation for all-out war. Brittles leads a patrol to try and avert war, being forced to accomodate the wife (Mildred Natwick) of his commanding officer (George O'Brien) and pretty young Olivia (Joanne Dru), who finds herself romantically pursued by Lieutenants Cohill (John Agar) and Pennell (Harry Carey Jr.). Brittles reaches his retirement, but unofficially tags along on one last mission.

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon is perhaps best-viewed as a visual experience. Cinematographer Winton C. Hoch won an Oscar for his beautiful Technicolor photography, and it's extremely well-deserved. Monument Valley has never looked lovier, and at times the film bears comparison to Lawrence of Arabia and 2001: A Space Odyssey in its visual grandeur. Ford and Hoch's visual storytelling is without peer, with the beautiful crags, mesas, buttes and red dust of Monument Valley making an incredible impression. Every shot is beautifully composed, with cavalry crossing the desert, herds of buffalo and chases and skirmishes providing a rich visual treat. The final raid on an Indian camp provides an exciting climax.

As in Fort Apache, Yellow Ribbon is primarily a celebration of military life. The film has a sparse, episodic narrative, focusing on a "day in the life" of the US Cavalry, on a routine patrol through the desert that's ultimately a failure. Bad guys - not only the Indians but sleazy gun-runners - are almost inconsequential. As before, the Army is presented as a family where differences of class, race and so on are put aside for a greater good: most poignantly, a brief subplot features ex-Confederate Sergeant Tyreen (Ben Johnson) burying a former colleague (Rudy Bowman) with full Confederate honors. Dubious though it may be, this picture of military life is at least artfully expressed.

The film does have its share of faults. The story is sparse and oft-non-existent, but this is of minimal importance. The awkward love triangle is badly handled and comes off as a distraction. Most unfortunate of all, Victor McLaglen is on-hand to provide his trademark drunk Irishman schtick, and the movie features an obnoxious brawl towards the end that seems jarringly out of place. The final scene, with Brittles returning to military life, seems equally odd and somewhat unsatisfying: it has a curious (if wholly unintentional) resonnance with The Hurt Locker, of a soldier who's happy only in uniform. That film's protagonist comes back because he's off his nut; Brittles stays because, well, who'd want to leave such a perfect family?

John Wayne gives one of his best performances as Captain Brittles. As in Red River, Wayne convincingly plays a much older character and fills it with the right mixture of pride and weariness. Wayne surprisingly comes off best in the quiet moments, particularly his visits to his wife's grave and his farewell to the troopers. It's well that Wayne is so good, as the supporting cast is mostly unremarkable - even the pretty Joanne Dru doesn't come off well - but who really can complain?

http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2010/07/she-wore-yellow-ribbon-and-sergeant.html (http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2010/07/she-wore-yellow-ribbon-and-sergeant.html)


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: Dust Devil on July 12, 2010, 11:26:45 PM
Could it be that I'm her secret lover and she wore that yellow ribbon 'round her neck just for me...


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on February 04, 2011, 07:37:11 AM
"She Wore A Yellow Ribbon" is a very good movie (as far as its place in Ford's Cavalry Trilogy: it is not as good as Fort Apache, but better than Rio Grande).

titoli and Groggy: what's with all the hostility toward Victor McLaglen? I think he was a hilarious and wonderful actor. I love watching him!


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: Dust Devil on February 04, 2011, 10:02:47 AM
titoli and Groggy: what's with all the hostility toward Victor McLaglen?

I'm sure it has to do something with Andrew V. McLaglen.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: titoli on February 04, 2011, 08:37:09 PM
I'm sure it has to do something with Andrew V. McLaglen.

No, it has to do with John Ford.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: Groggy on February 04, 2011, 10:08:57 PM
No, it has to do with John Ford.

That's it.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: dave jenkins on December 20, 2014, 11:47:56 PM
I don't follow Twitter feeds (twits?) but I just happened to come across this:
https://twitter.com/terryteachout/status/546451532842283009/photo/1


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on December 21, 2014, 12:15:55 AM
This movie needs a BRD release already


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on May 29, 2016, 03:51:22 PM
BRD to be available on Amazon on June 7 http://goo.gl/PBv1ph


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: dave jenkins on May 29, 2016, 06:18:56 PM
BRD to be available on Amazon on June 7 http://goo.gl/PBv1ph
Yeah. They Were Expendable comes out the same day.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 07, 2016, 04:12:03 PM
BRD to be available on Amazon on June 7 http://goo.gl/PBv1ph
Amazon didn't ship! Their page reads: Temporarily Out of Stock. My ass!

Somebody in the supply chain fell down on the job. Meanwhile, I'm not waiting for those clowns to get their act together. DeepDiscount appears to have the disc in stock--and cheaper. Yeah, I'll go with them (and I just renewed my Prime membership at amazon. Bathtubs!)


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 08, 2016, 02:53:35 AM
Amazon didn't ship! Their page reads: Temporarily Out of Stock. My ass!

Somebody in the supply chain fell down on the job. Meanwhile, I'm not waiting for those clowns to get their act together. DeepDiscount appears to have the disc in stock--and cheaper. Yeah, I'll go with them (and I just renewed my Prime membership at amazon. Bathtubs!)
O0
Indeed, good advice.

I had the same issue - my pre-order was supposed to be available June 7, but it didn't ship. I tried canceling - and eventually was able to (they initially didn't let me cuz the BRD was part of a larger order of $49 for non-Prime members to get free shipping) , but when i got ahold of customer service and told her how unfair it was to not allow me to cancel now that the pre-order sale has passed, they relented and canceled my order. Then, I bought it from Deep Discount, whose price was so cheap that even with a $3.99 shipping fee I ended up payig a few cents less than what I would have had to pay Amazon!

Not sure exactly when I will receive it - and frankly, I am in no hurry. It's just good to know that I have ordered it from a place that does have them in stock and that it'll be on the post within a couple of days  ;)

Btw, for whatever it's worth, the Amazon customer service rep said that their supplier must have come through with less than what they had promised them. E.g., let's say Amazon took 1000 pre-orders because the supplier had promised them 1000 copies, but then the supplier only ended up coming through with 500 copies.

Thanks for the tip, DJ  O0

Now, does Deep Discount (whom I have ordered from in the past and like very much) always have new discs at prices cheaper than Amazon? In that case, it may be worthwhile for me not to do pre-sales anymore, just wait for Day 1 and then compare price of Amazon and Deep Discount?


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 08, 2016, 06:46:15 AM

Now, does Deep Discount (whom I have ordered from in the past and like very much) always have new discs at prices cheaper than Amazon? In that case, it may be worthwhile for me not to do pre-sales anymore, just wait for Day 1 and then compare price of Amazon and Deep Discount?
No, they just happen to be running a sale right now.

Usually amazon is the better way to go--until now I've never had an issue with them supplying an item on its street date. Obviously I'll be keeping an eye on them from now on.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 16, 2016, 04:42:47 PM
DJ, have you seen the BRD yet?

Mine came in the mail, but I have not had a chance to watch it yet.

Beaver is unhappy with it (though he only posts BRD's screencaps, not the DVD's, so you can't compare) http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film5/blu-ray_reviews_71/she_wore_a_yellow_ribbon_blu-ray.htm

I'll have a look when I have a chance, but I guess I'll be hanging onto my copy of the DVD as well.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: T.H. on June 16, 2016, 07:53:44 PM
DJ, have you seen the BRD yet?

Mine came in the mail, but I have not had a chance to watch it yet.

Beaver is unhappy with it (though he only posts BRD's screencaps, not the DVD's, so you can't compare) http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film5/blu-ray_reviews_71/she_wore_a_yellow_ribbon_blu-ray.htm

I'll have a look when I have a chance, but I guess I'll be hanging onto my copy of the DVD as well.

I have good news for you. Beaver reviewed the Japanese region free bluray that was apparently released several weeks ago. I didn't notice it at first either.

Blu-ray.com's review of Warner's release was very complimentary:

http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/She-Wore-a-Yellow-Ribbon-Blu-ray/125364/


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 17, 2016, 02:54:29 PM
I've been in Japan all week, so I haven't seen it yet. It should be waiting for me when I get back on Monday and I'll give it a spin first thing. I'm glad T.H. has cleared up the confusion--I've read other reviews that were more than positive, so I'm expecting this to look really, really good.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 17, 2016, 05:50:51 PM
Thanks, T.H.  O0


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: T.H. on June 17, 2016, 08:15:38 PM
No problem. I just clicked the link for a second time and then randomly caught that it was the Japanese disc, which is so odd that two different blurays would release within weeks of one another when there wasn't a release for like 8 years (as far as I know).


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 20, 2016, 11:45:30 PM
That's a sloppy job by Beaver. If any of you are on his email list or ever contact him, you should tell him to get his shit together, i.e., review the Warner Bros. BRD.


anyway ... I just skipped around through the first half-hour or so of the Warner Bros. BRD, and it is BEAUTIFUL. (In fact, maybe don't tell Beaver anything. I prefer to think of him going through life with the crappy Jap disc; the WB one is too good for him.) Won't have time to watch more before I have to go to sleep. It's BEAUTIFUL.

As for the movie itself: This is very pretty to look at, but IMO Fort Apache is clearly the best of the trilogy. SWAYR really has no real conflict like FA does. Everything is nice and cute and the whole attempt is to make peace and avoid war. In FA, there is the conflict with the Fonda character, then the conflict with the Indians; and Wayne trying to make peace but Fonda bringing a needless war. So, in FA, you get all the nice stuff about life on a military base, but there's also a real toughness; and then the "print the legend" ending.
SWAYR has much less toughness, no real conflict. It's cutesy stuff and beautiful Technicolor. A nice film, but not in the same realm as FA, or Stagecoach or The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance or My Darling Clementine. For me, there are four Ford Westerns that get a 9/10-10/10: Stagecoach, My Darling Clementine, Fort Apache, and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

But, yeah, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon is damn beautiful to look at  :) O0


speaking of Remington, I saw this painting of his at The Met http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/11.192/



Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 22, 2016, 07:46:17 AM
She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949) - 9/10. John Ford's love letter to the profession of arms. Refreshingly, the film favors a meandering narrative over the conventions of drama (e.g. all action does not build to a single climax). This allows Ford to explore the work-a-day-world of professional soldiering whilst dispensing with the usual story elements enjoyed by children and retards. Naturally Ford wishes to honor the men who fought WWII, and there are occasionally anachronistic touches (A fort bar operating during duty hours?), but attention to the details of Indian fighting circa 1876 is often scrupulously observed. One thing I noticed on this viewing is the many times the troop mascot races along with the horse soldiers--like something a painter might have observed; also, I was gratified to see the men on patrol routinely walking their mounts as per SOP; another great thing is the use made of bugle calls. I did a little bit of bugling in Boy Scouts myself--I even got the merit badge--and I remember having to learn a lot of the calls. It wasn't always clear to me what the purpose of every call was. When, for example, was "Officer's Call" used? The picture gives us an answer: when the commander wants his officers--and only his officers--to leave the troop and join him on point.

Ford goes wrong when he decides to throw in the occasional "humorous" scene; Victor McLaglen's donnybrook in the bar is an egregious case (and the reason I can't give this film a "10"). Also, Ford's taste in music is insipid--we get the tiresome title theme again and again ("Hey, this approach worked so well in My Darling Clementine") and too rarely a jaunty air such as "Garryowen" (the march tune of the 7th Cavalry). But these cavils do not spoil things for me. And then there's the glorious Technicolor, rendered so well on the new Warner disc in 1080p. Break out the sunglasses! Finally, it's wonderful to have an entertaining film where irony is almost non-existent and cynicism is zero. It's amazing that, once upon a time, such a film could be made.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on June 22, 2016, 11:14:21 AM
She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949) - 9/10. John Ford's love letter to the profession of arms. Refreshingly, the film favors a meandering narrative over the conventions of drama (e.g. all action does not build to a single climax). This allows Ford to explore the work-a-day-world of professional soldiering whilst dispensing with the usual story elements enjoyed by children and retards. Naturally Ford wishes to honor the men who fought WWII, and there are occasionally anachronistic touches (A fort bar operating during duty hours?), but attention to the details of Indian fighting circa 1876 is often scrupulously observed. One thing I noticed on this viewing is the many times the troop mascot races along with the horse soldiers--like something a painter might have observed; also, I was gratified to see the men on patrol routinely walking their mounts as per SOP; another great thing is the use made of bugle calls. I did a little bit of bugling in Boy Scouts myself--I even got the merit badge--and I remember having to learn a lot of the calls. It wasn't always clear to me what the purpose of every call was. When, for example, was "Officer's Call" used? The picture gives us an answer: when the commander wants his officers--and only his officers--to leave the troop and join him on point.

Ford goes wrong when he decides to throw in the occasional "humorous" scene; Victor McLaglen's donnybrook in the bar is an egregious case (and the reason I can't give this film a "10"). Also, Ford's taste in music is insipid--we get the tiresome title theme again and again ("Hey, this approach worked so well in My Darling Clementine") and too rarely a jaunty air such as "Garryowen" (the march tune of the 7th Cavalry). But these cavils do not spoil things for me. And then there's the glorious Technicolor, rendered so well on the new Warner disc in 1080p. Break out the sunglasses! Finally, it's wonderful to have an entertaining film where irony is almost non-existent and cynicism is zero. It's amazing that, once upon a time, such a film could be made.

Nice review, nice movie, great BRD. But is there anything here about the "work-a-day-world of professional soldiering" and daily life on the fort that isn't already in Fort Apache? (Besides the Technicolor, of course.) Also, as you mention, those songs by the Sons of the Pioneers or whichever male singing group does it, very annoying; Ford does this a lot, also in The Horse Soldiers and in Rio Grande. I really like the military music in Fort Apache and you have none of the annoying songs by the Sons of the Pioneers.

I think it's only children and retards that prefer that a movie has no conflict or cynicism. Aren't you a big fan of film noir? And Leone?

Oh, I forgot - you just don't like cynicism/dishonorableness when it comes to the military. You want to imagine that every military member is honorable, and that there are no Col. Thursdays. I prefer to have a mix, which I think is probably more realistic and certainly more enjoyable to watch. I think the military has Owen Thursdays as well as Kirby Yorkes  ;)

But yeah, the BRD is beautiful  :) :) :) :) :)


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: dave jenkins on June 22, 2016, 04:45:08 PM
I think it's only children and retards that prefer that a movie has no conflict or cynicism. Aren't you a big fan of film noir? And Leone?
I'm a big fan of a lot of things. That's why when I go out to dinner, I don't always order a steak.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: greenbudgie on April 18, 2017, 06:52:20 AM
I liked the fantastic scenery and muted smoky photography in this. What action scenes it has are good but I could have done with a bit more confrontation generally. Taking the role of an older character brings out the best in John Wayne. His best performance I reckon.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: dave jenkins on April 21, 2017, 07:20:10 AM
His best performance I reckon.
Nah: True Grit. Anyway, his performances don't really differ. He just seems to be doing a better job when his characters are better written.


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: cigar joe on April 21, 2017, 07:58:52 AM
Nah: True Grit. Anyway, his performances don't really differ. He just seems to be doing a better job when his characters are better written.

true dat


Title: Re: She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)
Post by: drinkanddestroy on October 18, 2017, 01:46:10 AM
by the way, Beaver did eventually get around to reviewing the WB BRD. Here are screencaps comparing it to the Jap BRD
http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film5/blu-ray_reviews_71/she_wore_a_yellow_ribbon_blu-ray.htm

for once in his life, Beaver made me laugh, writing that he is posting the screencap comparisons "without comment," so as not "to be accused of 'stating the obvious'."  ;D Yeah, the WB version is obviously a billion times better than the Jap  O0