Sergio Leone Web Board

Other/Miscellaneous => Ennio Morricone => Topic started by: titoli on October 14, 2009, 05:20:18 PM



Title: "... lonely, mournful scores..."
Post by: titoli on October 14, 2009, 05:20:18 PM
I have nothing against Roger Ebert, he could even decide to commit suicide tomorrow and I would raise no objection. But can anybody explain what "lonely score" is supposed to mean? (the quotation about Morricone's score for Leone is to be found in his adjourned review of GBU).



Title: Re: "... lonely, mournful scores..."
Post by: titoli on October 15, 2009, 03:38:11 PM
If Morricone's music evokes images of lonely figures who wander from place to place, have short term acquaintances and leave mournful people in their wake, he is doing a good job.  The Eastwood and Bronson characters may be admired and have followers but they are basically loners who like to make an impact on their surroundings by their individual actions.




So if somebody who never saw the movies will listen to the music, MWNN and Harmonica (or something like them) will materialize in front of him? Great. I remember as a child having heard first the music of FOD and nothing of the sort happened, but probably I was an exception.


Title: Re: "... lonely, mournful scores..."
Post by: titoli on October 16, 2009, 10:25:19 AM
I'm not talking about the contribution of Morricone to Leone's movies. I'm simply saying that the expression "lonely score" makes no sense.  "Mournful" just a little bit more because one can think that a score can be based on music usually played on mournful occasions: though I don't think that can be said about Morricone's scores for Leone, even OUTW (and in spite of the chance some music might be played in funereal occasions). There are songs slow and in minor mode, but that doesn't mean necessarily they're "mournful". To stick adjectives to a not verbal language as music is amateurish and good for most of people who don't know a thing of what music is. But the "critic" in question, in spite of his not being a beginner, insists on displaying all of his amateurishness. He should know better about talking of things he doesn't know at all.