Sergio Leone Web Board

Films of Sergio Leone => Once Upon A Time In America => Topic started by: Derbent 5000 on September 22, 2010, 11:44:12 AM



Title: Blu-ray
Post by: Derbent 5000 on September 22, 2010, 11:44:12 AM
Once Upon A Time In America Blu-ray has been anonunced 11 January but unfortunantley nothing new has been add for this release according to the blu-ray.com site it's 229 Min i believe previous comentary and half documentary chek this link

http://www.highdefdiscnews.com/?p=52634

http://www.blu-ray.com/news/?id=5179


Title: Re: Blu-ray release
Post by: dave jenkins on September 22, 2010, 12:35:41 PM
Well spotted. A definite buy for me.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: LITTLE BIG MAN on September 23, 2010, 01:47:18 PM
From Digital Bits: In announcement news today, Warner Home Video has just set Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in America for Blu-ray Disc release on 1/11/11 (SRP $24.98). The film will be presented in its full, uncut length of 229 minutes. Extras will include audio commentary by film historian and critic Richard Schickel, the making-of documentary Once Upon a Time: Sergio Leone, a Photographic Memories still gallery with 96 images and theatrical trailers. The release will also be issued as a 2-disc DVD Special Edition that same day (SRP $19.97).

Unfortunately this is just the same 2003 DVD release transferred to Blu Ray - avoid!  Shame on WarnerBros >:(

From previous post on September 6th: For fans in the UK

Film 4 HD 22.50 Monday 6th September - first time showing in HD as far as I know.  On again on Sunday 12th 23.20 - in case you miss it.

Will report back on how it looked. 

OK Unfortunately OUATIA looked quite poor in HD - In fact there didn't seem much difference from it showing on HD Film 4 & it showing on standard Film 4 (the same night) the picture quality wasn't particularly sharp & already the print/master/DVD Film 4 were using (2003 I think) is already starting to show signs of wear & tear (lots of dirt evident).

Hopefully Warner Bros will be looking at a brand new remastering of this film for Blu - Ray, otherwise its going to be a very disappointing release.

A clean up & release along the same lines as the Godfather would suffice. 

Oh well looks like that was too much to ask Warner Bros ::)


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: LITTLE BIG MAN on September 23, 2010, 02:06:36 PM
Very Very Dissapointing from Warner Bros - would have expected more from this great studio - this is a straight transfer of the 2003 DVD version to Blu Ray - as I said earlier the 2003 version already shown on Film Four in HD is not much better than the standard version - which already is starting to look its age.

Warner Home Video Press Release:

"May be the definitive gangster picture. Rarely equaled."

David N. Meyer, THE NEW YORK TIMES

Robert De Niro and James Woods Star in Sergio Leone’s           Critically Acclaimed Masterpiece

Once Upon A Time In America
 
Highly Anticipated Debut on Blu-ray Disc™ and Two-Disc Special Edition DVD
 

Available January 11 from Warner Home Video
 

Burbank, Calif., September 22, 2010 – Considered to be Sergio Leone’s masterpiece and one of the finest works within the gangster genre, Once Upon A Time In America (1984) debuts for the first time on Blu-ray Disc and as a two-disc Special Edition on January 11 from Warner Home Video. Recognized by director Martin Scorsese as a major influence on his career, the film features a star-studded cast of Oscar® winners including, Robert De Niro (“Goodfellas,” “The Godfather ll,” “Little Fokkers”), Joe Pesci (“Goodfellas,” “Casino,” “My Cousin Vinny”) and Oscar® nominee James Woods (“Ghosts of Mississippi,” “Salvador”). The film will be offered in its full length – three hours and forty-nine minutes – and will feature four hours of bonus content including commentary by noted film historian Richard Schickel, a making-of documentary and theatrical trailers. Orders are due December 7 (Blu-ray Disc SRP $24.98 / two-disc Special Edition DVD SRP $19.97).

 

“Once Upon A Time In America” received two Golden Globe® nominations for Best Director and Best Original Score; won the British Academy of Film and Theater Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Score and Best Costume Design; and earned Best Supporting Actress, Best Director, and Best Cinematography nominations for Tuesday Weld, Sergio Leone and Tonino Delli Colli. Composer Ennio Morricone’s haunting score won the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award.

 

ABOUT THE FILM

 

Sergio Leone, the Italian filmmaker whose artistic sensibilities created new interpretations of the American western with his landmark productions of “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly,” “A Fistful of Dollars” and “For A Few Dollars More,” and who brought international stardom to Clint Eastwood, crafts an unparalleled saga about two friends and the complex urban underworld in which they live.

 

Starring Robert De Niro (“Little Fockers,” “Machete,” “Goodfellas,” “The Godfather ll,”) as David “Noodles” Aaronson and James Woods (“Ghosts of Mississippi,” “Salvador”) as Max, the boyhood cohort with whom his life becomes inextricably meshed, Once Upon A Time In America chronicles the ruthless ambitions that drive them. The compelling story embraces a world of gritty realities, raw emotions, secret longings, explosive conflicts, and the volatile passions that destroy them and those who love them. Directed by Sergio Leone, the film follows Noodles and Max and their cadre of Jewish gangsters in New York from their early 1900’s childhood, through the glory years of prohibition and their subsequent reunion 35 years later.

 

Once Upon A Time In America features a stellar cast of well-known and respected actors, including the debut of Academy Award® winner Jennifer Connelly (“He's Just Not That Into You,” “Inkheart,” “Blood Diamond,” “A Beautiful Mind”), and such stars as Elizabeth McGovern (“Clash of the Titans,” “Kick-Ass”), Treat Williams (“What Happens in Vegas” “Everwood” TV series, “Prince of the City”), Tuesday Weld (“Feeling Minnesota”) and Joe Pesci (“Goodfellas,” “Casino,” “My Cousin Vinny”) play roles exquisitely interpreted in Leone’s masterpiece.

 

With a haunting score by Ennio Morricone, Once Upon A Time In America marks a milestone in cinema history as the ultimate saga about the life of early urban gangsters and lasts in memory long after the last frame.

 

Special features include:

 

·        Commentary by film historian and critic Richard Schickel

·        Making-of documentary: “Once Upon a Time: Sergio Leone”

·        Photographic Memories: Still Gallery with 96 images

·        Theatrical trailers

 

*special features listed above are subject to change.

 

 

ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA (1984)

 

Rating: R

Run Time: 229 mins

Order Date: 12/7/10

Street Date: 1/11/11

Languages: English

DVD UPC / CAT#: 1000170042 / 883929158300

BD UPC / CAT#: 1000170419 / 883929158713

DVD SE / BD MSRP: $19.97/$24.98


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: dave jenkins on December 05, 2010, 11:58:19 AM
Disappointing, to be sure. But I'll wait for the reviews. If the PQ is even moderately improved, I'll probably get it.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Novecento on December 05, 2010, 12:36:38 PM
Disappointing, to be sure. But I'll wait for the reviews. If the PQ is even moderately improved, I'll probably get it.

Same here. Although I have no doubts I'll be buying it.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: TheFlexibleFlyingCzar on December 05, 2010, 02:49:54 PM
Hopefully the whole film is on one disc so you don't have to take it out and put the second disc in. It is sad though that we probably won't be getting any new extras.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Novecento on December 05, 2010, 03:03:20 PM
Hopefully the whole film is on one disc so you don't have to take it out and put the second disc in. It is sad though that we probably won't be getting any new extras.

I'm sure it will be. Yeh, that's a shame, although the bigger shame is that we're not getting to see all the cut stuff.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: O'Cangaceiro on December 05, 2010, 03:07:01 PM
Disappointing, to be sure. But I'll wait for the reviews. If the PQ is even moderately improved, I'll probably get it.

I won't. At least, not for the foreseeable future. I'm tired about this money grab, as you keep paying over and over for basically the same product.  >:(



Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: The Firecracker on December 05, 2010, 03:34:22 PM
I won't. At least, not for the foreseeable future. I'm tired about this money grab, as you keep paying over and over for basically the same product.  >:(


That's the spirit.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: TheFlexibleFlyingCzar on January 06, 2011, 06:06:29 AM
DVDBeaver posted their review up with a comparison of the DVD version.

http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/dvdreviews16/once_upon_a_time_in_america_dvd_review.htm (http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/dvdreviews16/once_upon_a_time_in_america_dvd_review.htm)


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: dave jenkins on January 06, 2011, 09:54:57 AM
The multiple dubs is a strong selling point. In spite of the less-than-stellar PQ, I guess I'll be getting it.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Walton on January 06, 2011, 03:29:34 PM
I'll probably get it too, but the less-than-ideal picture quality is a bit of a disappointment. It'd be good to have the whole film on one disk, but I'd been hoping for a new transfer for this whereas it seems like they have just up-rezzed an older HD master, probably made when they did the telecine for the dvd release. I'm not holding my breath for a newly remastered special edition, so this may well end up being the definitive version.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Groggy on January 06, 2011, 04:41:19 PM
DVD Savant's take.

http://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s3399time.html (http://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s3399time.html)

Savant isn't a huge fan of the film, but I think most of his criticisms are fair ones.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: dave jenkins on January 07, 2011, 09:11:30 AM
Savant isn't a huge fan of the film, but I think most of his criticisms are fair ones.

More to the point, his comments on the disc itself provide reason for hope:

Quote
The video and audio are ravishing. Except for his first film The Colossus of Rhodes, all of Leone's westerns were filmed in the half-frame Techniscope format. America is flat 1:85 and looks all the better for it. Multi-channel audio tracks are included for English, French and Spanish, with subtitles in each language as well. Ennio Morricone's wonderful score could easily have won an Oscar, if the producers had just entered it in competition.

The video is "ravishing"? PQ must be a substantial improvement over the DVD, then.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Novecento on January 09, 2011, 05:33:56 AM
It looks good to me and I like how they have repaired the slightly off-coloring of the DVD. I'll definitely be buying this. 


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: dave jenkins on January 12, 2011, 06:57:54 AM
 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0 O0


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: dave jenkins on January 13, 2011, 01:47:09 PM
http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Once-Upon-a-Time-in-America-Blu-ray/16190/#Review

The money quote:
Quote
There already seems to be some (unfounded) controversy brewing over Once Upon a Time in America's AVC encoded 1080p image, in 1.78:1. I am probably one of the few people who saw the film theatrically (several times) in both its truncated and uncut versions, and it is my considered opinion that the film has never looked this good before. Overall there is a clarity and sharpness to this presentation which reveals whole new levels of fine detail. There is also a noticeable uptick in contrast and especially black values, at least in some scenes. Compare the opening moments of this Blu-ray with any previous home video version and the differences are striking. Not only are colors more beautifully saturated, black levels in the shadowy apartment reveal the glint of pearls around Noodles' moll's neck and other details which simply weren't readily visible in earlier incarnations. There are some niggling complaints which I'm sure some people will obsess over, but they are all endemic to the source material. Seemingly inexplicably, some shots are fuzzy and soft (almost always medium range shots, which argues toward the culprit being a lens), as in the medium shot of Noodles standing on a rural road as two bicyclists pedal by. Also some of the darker scenes are indeed murky, with some milky blacks, but again I'm firmly convinced these are inherent to the source material and not a result of any tinkering in the Blu-ray transfer. Some people have expressed concern over the film's length and the fact that it's "stuffed" onto one BD-50. Streaming rates hovered around 15-16 Mbps, certainly not incredibly robust, but also nothing to be very alarmed about. There really aren't many compression artifacts here of any real import.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: T.H. on February 04, 2011, 07:33:02 PM
lol I didn't even know this was released yet and was shocked to see it for 15 USD. It was one of the best purchases of my life.

I also grabbed FOD and FAFDM b-rays for 10 each - I didn't know they were sold individually. I thought I was going to be forced to buy the (currently) overpriced collection.



Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: drinkanddestroy on July 24, 2012, 07:21:45 PM
DVD Savant's take.

http://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s3399time.html (http://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s3399time.html)

Savant isn't a huge fan of the film, but I think most of his criticisms are fair ones.

I just watched the blu ray all the way through for the first time, so I took a look at this thread, and the Savant link.


After first discussing the chopped version, Savant then refers to  the 229MV with "In this more expansive version..." That's basically like discussing Mara Krupp and then calling Claudia Cardinale a "better-looking actress..." He's kind of understating a major point, this is not just a "more expansive version," it's an entirely different movie. But this is consistent with his general misunderstanding of the movie, which I'll discuss presently.

But his final paragraph is just ridiculous: "Leone once used flashbacks brilliantly, adding gravity to his genre characters in Once Upon a Time in the West and Duck You Sucker without a hint of expository dialogue. Since we never quite relate Noodles' opium-smoking to his other experiences, we can't exactly see why the convoluted time structure was necessary." Erickson seems completely oblivious to the dream theory,. Even if he disagrees with it, he should at least mention it, that would provide a possible explanation the "convoluted time structure" that so befuddles him. (Unless he specifically isn't mentioning it cuz he doesn't want to spoil the film, which I doubt, since it would answer his question), this is absolutely unforgivable. OUATIA is all about time, memories, fantasy, etc. Erickson's comments make it seem like he views this movie as a straight rags-to-riches, rise and fall gangster story. The movie is meaningless without the time structure. He misses the point of this movie entirely, which doesn't surprise me. (There are other things I disagree with him on (eg. I think the old-age makeup was brilliant) but that's just a matter of opinion so I won't waste my time with it).
  
Some critics are useless, but Erickson is actually worse than that; he is a detriment to cinema. I've been utterly disgusted the few times I've read his stuff, and I'm never again going to waste my time doing so again.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Groggy on July 24, 2012, 07:30:07 PM
Strange. In his review of the DVD he writes:

Quote
The device of reducing De Niro to an Opium-soaked time-tripper, blending a ringing phone across decades of memories and flattening his personality into a hazy smile, doesn't compensate for the disconnect on the character/genre level. Reviewers who give up on putting together the puzzle of his personality sometimes theorize that much of the story is a dope dream conjured on the doss-house bed. Which is the same as saying the film is about nothing, and it's definitely not. This grandiose and impressive film is too intellectually aware, too convinced of its own significance. It lacks the genre resonance that Leone brought to his Westerns.

http://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s861once.html (http://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s861once.html)


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: drinkanddestroy on July 24, 2012, 07:39:28 PM
Yes, that is strange.

But even in that quote from the dvd review I think Erickson makes the same mistake about the dream theory that I addressed in the other thread: he believes that if you support the dream theory then you lose all the themes that the 1968 scenes bring. That is ridiculous. All the important themes of the movie are just as applicable even if it is a dream. It's silly to think that just cuz the 1968 scenes are happening in a dream, they become devoid of all meaning or themes.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Groggy on July 24, 2012, 07:55:57 PM
It has nothing to do with themes and everything to do with treating the audience like chumps.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: drinkanddestroy on July 24, 2012, 08:20:50 PM
It has nothing to do with themes and everything to do with treating the audience like chumps.

it's not like "and then he woke up, haha, we played a trick on you, it really didn't happen!!!" That would indeed be treating the audience like chumps. In this case, the dream is a significant part of the theme of the movie itself. So it's not like they pulled a fast one on us. I don't mean to debate the dream theory here, we've done that plenty in the other threads. My point is just that IF the dream theory is correct, that wouldn't be treating the audience like chumps, nor would it mean that the themes of the 1968 scenes are lost.  I would argue in fact that all these themes are strengthened by the fact that it's a dream


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: stanton on July 25, 2012, 05:34:00 AM
by the fact that it's a dream

Only that it is not a fact


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: drinkanddestroy on July 25, 2012, 05:47:21 AM
Only that it is not a fact

you either didn't read the rest of these posts, or are misunderstanding me or misinterpreting me intentionally.

I'll say this one final time: my intent here is NOT to debate the dream theory; we've done that already in other threads. My intent here was to state two points: A) that Erickson should have at least mentioned the dream theory, whether he supports it or not, for reasons explained above; and B) (the context of your quote) was that IF the dream theory is correct, that wouldn't eliminate all the themes of the 1968 scene; rather, it strengthens them. And therefore doesn't turn the audience into chumps either.... The point is simply that the dream theory should not be dismissed on the basis of claim that if the dream theory is correct, you lose the themes of 1968 or the audience is turned into chumps.... Yes, sometimes you have to say for the sake of argument, "IF X is true, how does that affect Y and Z?" Well, if the dream theory is true, that does not minimize the themes from 1968, nor does it turn the audience into chumps. That's the point. Your 8 word quotation of a part of a sentence I stated completely distorts what the discussion was about. The point of the discussion was not to re-litigate the underlying question of whether the dream theory is correct. It was only to discuss the effects of that argument, ie. depending on the answer to the dream theory debate, how does that affect the rest of the movie.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Groggy on July 25, 2012, 08:49:04 AM
By the ghost of Jack Sprat, you must be trippin'!


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: stanton on July 25, 2012, 02:42:43 PM
you either didn't read the rest of these posts, or are misunderstanding me or misinterpreting me intentionally.

I'll say this one final time: my intent here is NOT to debate the dream theory; we've done that already in other threads. My intent here was to state two points: A) that Erickson should have at least mentioned the dream theory, whether he supports it or not, for reasons explained above; and B) (the context of your quote) was that IF the dream theory is correct, that wouldn't eliminate all the themes of the 1968 scene; rather, it strengthens them. And therefore doesn't turn the audience into chumps either.... The point is simply that the dream theory should not be dismissed on the basis of claim that if the dream theory is correct, you lose the themes of 1968 or the audience is turned into chumps.... Yes, sometimes you have to say for the sake of argument, "IF X is true, how does that affect Y and Z?" Well, if the dream theory is true, that does not minimize the themes from 1968, nor does it turn the audience into chumps. That's the point. Your 8 word quotation of a part of a sentence I stated completely distorts what the discussion was about. The point of the discussion was not to re-litigate the underlying question of whether the dream theory is correct. It was only to discuss the effects of that argument, ie. depending on the answer to the dream theory debate, how does that affect the rest of the movie.

As long as it is a theory it can't be a fact.

I can't blame Erickson for not mentioning it, I wouldn't have done it either. Maybe if I was writing a large essay on OuTA I would spend the Dream theory one or two sentences.
But he is wrong about calling OuTA a film with flashbacks. Not even the youth part is a real flashback. Very different to the use of flashbacks in Leone's westerns.

And if the interpretation of the 1968 parts is the same with or without the dream, then for what do we need it?


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: drinkanddestroy on July 25, 2012, 02:52:31 PM
As long as it is a theory it can't be a fact.

I can't blame Erickson for not mentioning it, I wouldn't have done it either. Maybe if I was writing a large essay on OuTA I would spend the Dream theory one or two sentences.
But he is wrong about calling OuTA a film with flashbacks. Not even the youth part is a real flashback. Very different to the use of flashbacks in Leone's westerns.

And if the interpretation of the 1968 parts is the same with or without the dream, then for what do we need it?

I didn't say that the interpretation of the 1968 scenes is identical whether or not it's a dream. But the point is that the 1968 scenes aren't devoid of all meaning just because it's a dream.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Groggy on July 25, 2012, 04:59:30 PM
As long as it is a theory it can't be a fact.

Until drink realizes this, any discussion on this topic is futile.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: dave jenkins on July 26, 2012, 03:25:06 PM
My point is just that IF the dream theory is correct, that wouldn't be treating the audience like chumps, nor would it mean that the themes of the 1968 scenes are lost.  I would argue in fact that all these themes are strengthened by the fact that it's a dream
Couldn't disagree with you more. Bailey in 1968 offers Noodles a chance for revenge. Noodles doesn't take it. There is a huge moral difference between "dreaming" a temptation (and dreaming its avoidance) and actually experiencing the temptation and then choosing to avoid it. A man cannot be held responsible for what he dreams. Neither can what he dreams be anything to his credit. Jurisprudence limits itself to the deeds (or sometime lack of same) of waking life. When Noodles refuses to kill Bailey, he is commiting a moral act. If he is only doing that in a dream state, he is at best (and even this isn't certain, human thought in dream states is unreliable) signalling an intention to commit a moral act. But an intention is not a deed. Ask any jurist.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: drinkanddestroy on July 26, 2012, 04:37:56 PM
Couldn't disagree with you more. Bailey in 1968 offers Noodles a chance for revenge. Noodles doesn't take it. There is a huge moral difference between "dreaming" a temptation (and dreaming its avoidance) and actually experiencing the temptation and then choosing to avoid it. A man cannot be held responsible for what he dreams. Neither can what he dreams be anything to his credit. Jurisprudence limits itself to the deeds (or sometime lack of same) of waking life. When Noodles refuses to kill Bailey, he is commiting a moral act. If he is only doing that in a dream state, he is at best (and even this isn't certain, human thought in dream states is unreliable) signalling an intention to commit a moral act. But an intention is not a deed. Ask any jurist.

You seem to think that redemption is a major theme of the movie; that the big moment is when Noodles's refuses to kill Bailey, and now he's redeemed himself. I really don't think that moment is as significant as you are making it out to be; I never thought that redemption is a major theme of the movie. It's much more about time, dreams, and mixing fantasy with reality. I don't think we're supposed to walk out of the theater saying "Yay, Noodles redeemed himself!" (Maybe if this was a Scorcese movie  ;))


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: nat on July 30, 2012, 11:56:13 PM
It's funny that you call Noodles refusal to shoot Mr Bailey an act of redemption (whether you consider it to be a major or minor or even non-existent theme). I always thought it was about the general themes of time and memories. Noodles consciously refuses to accept the new reality he confronts in his old age, the prefers to remain living in the 'reality' he has been morosely living with for decades. There is a conscious dissonance. That is why he constantly refers to him as Mr Bailey and refuses to address him as Max. That's why he leaves and refuses to delve into the details of the past few decades since Noodles self-imposed exile. It's not an act of redemption-it is refusing to drag himself out of the past he has become used to and has become his reality.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: drinkanddestroy on July 31, 2012, 01:30:14 AM
It's funny that you call Noodles refusal to shoot Mr Bailey an act of redemption (whether you consider it to be a major or minor or even non-existent theme). I always thought it was about the general themes of time and memories. Noodles consciously refuses to accept the new reality he confronts in his old age, the prefers to remain living in the 'reality' he has been morosely living with for decades. There is a conscious dissonance. That is why he constantly refers to him as Mr Bailey and refuses to address him as Max. That's why he leaves and refuses to delve into the details of the past few decades since Noodles self-imposed exile. It's not an act of redemption-it is refusing to drag himself out of the past he has become used to and has become his reality.

I don't really think it's about "redemption." My use of that word was in response to dj's comment, which seems to indicate a belief that this action by Noodles -- actually his non-action -- is an act of redemption (though dj didn't use that term, that seemed to me to be what he was referring to). But as I stated in my previous post, I don't think the movie is about redemption.

on a separate note, RE: the issue of Noodles refusing to acknowledge Max, but insisting on calling him "Mr. Bailey" or "Mr. Secretary":
do you think that this effect was somewhat ruined by his later comment that (paraphrasing) " people used to come to us, lovers, business partners. Some of the jobs we did took, and some we didn't take. Yours is a job we never would have touched." Sometimes I've wondered if this bit of dialogue was ill-advised, cuz even though he refuses acknowledge Max but insists on calling him "Bailey," once he talks about how "people used to come to us," he is basically talking about their old days together and admitting that yes, this is his old buddy Max. I don't really see what purpose that bit of dialogue serves anyway; all it seems to do is to possibly ruin the whole effect of Noodles's refusal to acknowledge Max. is there something I am completely missing here?


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: nat on August 01, 2012, 04:58:42 AM
I take your point but I thought when he said 'us' he was not referring to the man standing in front of him, but rather to the gang of old that used to exist decades ago. It seems to me that when he used the word 'us/we' he was excluding the man standing in front of him. It is consistent with what I said in my last post. It is as if to say who are you? You have no connection at all to 'us', the gang that now only exists in his melancholy memories. We (including Max of 1933) would never have taken such a job. As if to say 'you are not one of us'. It is an insult, and at the same time a conscious refusal to accept the reality, feeling more comfortable wallowing in his depressing memories.


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Senza on March 08, 2013, 04:52:17 AM
I'm not sure if this been posted here but does anyone know about this release of the 250 minute restoration - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Once-Upon-Time-America-volta/dp/B009HX6PH8 ?


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: drinkanddestroy on March 08, 2013, 01:17:21 PM
I'm not sure if this been posted here but does anyone know about this release of the 250 minute restoration - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Once-Upon-Time-America-volta/dp/B009HX6PH8 ?

That's the restored version shown at the last Cannes festival. For more info,  delve into these 40 pages of discussion http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=1302.0  actually, you can skip the first 100 posts on that page; the important stuff starts with Post #101 on page 7 http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=1302.msg146273#msg146273 (the first 100 posts are speculation, post #101 starts talking about the actual restoration)

In a nutshell: Leone very reluctantly had to remove 45-50 minutes of  material  from OUATIA because the movie was way too long. The 3:49 version we have now is missing the 45-50 minutes of footage that Leone believed was "significant," but he had to cut it cuz it wa sway too long.


A couple of years ago, a restoration was undertaken (arranged by Martin Scorcese and the Leone children, performed by Cinematographa di Bologna, funded by Gucci and the Film Foundation) to restore about 20-25 minutes of the 45-50 minutes of missing footage. The new 250 min. version was shown at Cannes last year and screened several places in Europe, but those restored scenes are of very poor quality. They released the blu ray in Italy but apparently it's not very good quality.

It's not clear why they only restored 20-25 minutes; there is hope that one day they may restore the rest of it. But for now, they have this version of the movie that's approx. 250 minutes long, but the new scenes are of noticeably poorer quality; it has been released in Italy but not in USA, though the restored scenes are available on Youtube I believe.

We are hoping that eventually they will be able to restore all 45-50 minutes in good quality, but who knows.

If you want to know what's in the missing 45-50 minutes, it is listed here http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=1302.msg146469#msg146469
You can find the script including those missing scenes in the Links and Downloads section of this site http://msb247.awardspace.com/

That's basically it; for more info, start delving into the 40 pages  of that thread. It'll have all you need to know (and a lot that you don't need to know  ;) )


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: chris on March 08, 2013, 01:23:29 PM
A detailed review of the Blu-ray content is at:

http://www.movie-censorship.com/report.php?ID=898776 (http://www.movie-censorship.com/report.php?ID=898776)

It is Region B locked and as far as I am aware there's no news yet of an updated or worldwide release.
 
 


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Senza on March 08, 2013, 06:09:08 PM
Well I live in Australia, and the blu ray region here is B so I guess that won't be a problem.

@ drinkanddestroy, thanks for the links, I just read through all of that, it's a shame that it hasn't been released anywhere other than Italy. I've actually seen the 250 minute restoration, and whilst I loved the restored footage, I hated the piss poor quality of it [especially the scene with Noodles and the Louise Fletcher character]. Like I said before with Leone's other restored movies, the new scenes only added something to the movie, and it never dragged. I actually didn't read the parts related to STDWD, seeing as how I want to read the OUATIA chapter for myself [I'm now up to the FOD chapter].


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: chris on March 09, 2013, 04:42:52 AM
I think the deleted scenes were first discovered about 20 years ago and it's a pity that an agreement on their release couldn't have been made with the copyright holders at that time.  20 years ago it would probably have been much easier to restore the footage and the finished quality should have been much better.

French websites have reported a couple of interviews with Martin Scorcese.  At ecranlarge.com he talked about the further 20 minutes he hoped to add to the extended cut at some future time but didn't go into precise details.  For anyone who hasn't seen it, the article at lemonde.fr is worth a look.  Scorcese talks about the first time he met Sergio Leone, their relationship, the first time he saw Once Upon A Time In America, Leone's other films, the additional scenes and the influence of Leone's work on Scorcese's movies.


Google translate: http://tinyurl.com/cz4fvz5 (http://tinyurl.com/cz4fvz5)


Original version: http://tinyurl.com/ca66orz (http://tinyurl.com/ca66orz)

   
 


Title: Re: Blu-ray
Post by: Senza on March 09, 2013, 04:59:58 AM
Awesome interview, thanks!