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31  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: Please help me identify where this frame is found in the film! on: September 03, 2014, 11:11:39 AM
The book will be printed - offset printing and with a glossy hardcover.

I will post sample pages (including cover, table of contents . . .)  as soon as possible.

Best,
Peter

32  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: Please help me identify where this frame is found in the film! on: September 03, 2014, 05:55:44 AM
In relation to my last post, here is more from the original Italian script so that you can see where the "skeleton shot" fits in:

Desert. The sun is glowing in the sky. Two forms unprotected from the sun are seen wandering in a scorching valley. Tuco is on horseback, and Blondie is walking ahead. [The musical cue for this scene, as described by Charles Leinberger41, “begins with a long and suspenseful introduction featuring a tonally ambiguous and disjunct piano melody accompanied by sustained string tremolos . . . [followed by] a beautiful English horn melody.”] The first part of the desert scene is similar to the film, except the script explicitly states that Tuco fires five shots in rapid succession into Blondie’s water canteen, and then he fires a sixth shot (characteristic 5:1 pattern) which sends Blondie’s hat flying. A little later the revengeful Tuco informs Blondie that the end of the desert is 140 miles away (in the film, Tuco says, “100 miles, that’s a nice walk . . .”). After his short speech, Tuco takes out a parasol from under the saddle, opens it and points it in the direction of the sun. A cut is described in the script: Tuco’s head is dangling and his eyes are heavy from tiredness. He rides past the camera . . . Blondie is now seen in the distance. His steps are heavy and sluggish. The heat has worn Blondie down. Nevertheless, he seems to have noticed that Tuco has fallen into a light sleep under his sunshade . . . Blondie looks around as if he is searching for something. About 10 meters in front of him is a white, gnawed animal skeleton. Blondie’s eyes appear to be hypnotized by this sight. He encroaches towards the skeleton. Close-up: Blondie’s hand appears in the frame and he grasps a club-like bone. The camera zooms on to Tuco, who suddenly turns, grabs his revolver and fires a shot. The bone flies out of Blondie’s hand and Tuco threatens him saying, “Don’t try that again. Now, get going!” Blondie sets off again. Tuco waits until he has gone past, and then he drinks out of his canteen. He also moistens his head and neck.
Blondie struggles as he walks on and on through the desert, and at some point he falls to his knees. Tuco rides around him as he tries to get back onto his feet. Blondie’s lips are one continuous wound, and his eyes are swollen and closed. Through the slits of his eyelids Blondie sees the slope of a dune which appears like an insurmountable wall. He struggles to his feet and tiresomely continues. Tuco rides past him and says tauntingly, “It’s just another 115 miles to the end of the desert, and eight hours until sundown. That’s nothing (he laughs).” Cut or cross dissolve (simultaneously fading out one image as another fades in): Tuco with his parasol opened is seen on horseback observing . . . From below, Blondie is seen approaching on all fours. As Blondie gets to within a few meters of Tuco, he is at the end of his strength and falls face down. Tuco gets down from his horse and cautiously approaches Blondie. Close-up: Blondie is motionless but the clanging of Tuco’s spurs indicates that he is coming closer. Blondie opens his eyes . . . Within a few centimeters of Blondie’s face, Tuco’s boot comes into the frame. In a state of desperation, Blondie plunges towards the boot and grabs it with both hands . . . but the boot is empty. Tuco, a little further away, laughs and slaps his hands on his belly . . . He lies on his back, shakes with laughter and kicks his feet in the air. Blondie is at his limit and lets his face fall again into the sand.
33  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: Please help me identify where this frame is found in the film! on: September 03, 2014, 05:41:27 AM
Wow, this is an amazing shot!! This shot is described in the original Italian script! Below is the relevant part of the script:

"The heat has worn Blondie down. Nevertheless, he seems to have noticed that Tuco has fallen into a light sleep under his sunshade . . . Blondie looks around as if he is searching for something. About 10 meters in front of him is a white, gnawed animal skeleton. Blondie’s eyes appear to be hypnotized by this sight. He encroaches towards the skeleton. Close-up: Blondie’s hand appears in the frame and he grasps a club-like bone. The camera zooms on to Tuco, who suddenly turns, grabs his revolver and fires a shot. The bone flies out of Blondie’s hand and Tuco threatens him saying, “Don’t try that again. Now, get going!” Blondie sets off again."

The GBU book is complete! End of next week, I have an appointment to make the last changes, then I will have the first complete digital draft.

Best,
Peter
34  General Information / Film Locations / Re: How are the interiors in Mini Hollywood? on: September 04, 2011, 03:18:54 AM
The GBU farmhouse interior was shot at Cortijo de la Hoya Altica, about 1.5 km from Retamar (which is west of the location). The location has always been used for housing animals - in the film, you can see the food troughs in the background. About 3 km east of the cortijo is the Centro de visitantes las Amolaaderas - near where the GBU desert scenes were shot, with the Sierra del Cabo de Gata in the background.

The interiors of FAFDM are a bit tricky. There are a few stills in the extended FAFDM DVD (UA-MGM) showing (from memory) Leone, Lee Van Cleef, Eastwood, another guy and a woman in a long  leather coat all sitting around in a large room. If you look at the chair legs, you can read CINECITTA (written vertically). I have the full-res stills (from 6 x 6 cm negatives), and it may not be possible to read CINECITTA on the DVD (I haven't tried). There is another still showing Leone demonstrating something to Lee Van Cleef, in the room where Colonel Mortimer inspects his small arms arsenal. Leone and the woman have exactly the same clothing as in the other still, indicating that the scene was shot at Cinecitta, Rome. As far as I am aware, Cinecitta was not used for the GBU.

MiniHollywood is a big disaster. The saloon exterior and groundfloor are intact, but, like everyone else, I haven't been upstairs. The interior of El Paso bank is some sort of museum - old cameras and common film posters etc. It was a very disappointing experience to visit MiniHollywood. I hardly took any photos. Much better are the big landscape scenes, which look just the same today as in 1964-1966.


yeah but that is from FOD. I am wondering about the "El Paso" set from FAFDM
35  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: Socorro Sequence on: August 23, 2011, 02:05:17 PM
The text essentially comes directly from the original Italian script. I got a very good German translation of the entire script from Ulrich Angersbach (collaborator on parts of the book) and then I translated it word-for-word (myself) from German to English. The entire script will be in the last chapter tentatively titled something like "Original script and film locations". In parts the script and film are 1:1 (which is not so often). In that case, I simply state so, without writing it word-for-word.

Yes, excellent! Afro Afro Afro Are you getting this from the shooting script?
36  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: Full Socorro screenplay from original Italian script part 3 on: August 23, 2011, 11:04:20 AM
Continued (pat 3):

Saloon. With the back of his hand Tuco brushes the glass away which the barman had placed in front of him, and he grabs the bottle by the neck. While he gulps, he closes his eyes blissfully, and the sound of alcohol whirling into his stomach can almost be heard. When he opens his eyes, he begins to assess quickly the situation . . . From Tuco’s perspective: On the other side of the saloon doors a procession of people can be seen putting their contribution into the hat. Tuco is now satisfied and looks at the barman, saying, “Amigo, have you seen a blond son of a bitch around these parts, he’s this tall [this sequence in seen in the French trailer for the film] . . . rides a brown horse, says little, el cavron . . . ?” The barman interjects, “Here, the people don’t speak much. Yeh, I think I can remember a guy like that.” Tuco briskly reaches out, seizes the barman by the chest and almost pulls him over the bar. He demands, “Speak! When did you see him?” The barman, shocked, replies, “A . . . .aah, no, six days ago. He was looking for someone . . .” Tuco snaps back, “Someone with a price on their head?” The barman replies, “Yeh, then . . . then he disappeared. He seems to be a bounty hunter.” Tuco abruptly releases the barman, uttering, “Judas. The pig . . .” and angrily he seizes the bottle and takes another gulp.
The barman sees something that stuns him . . . Out of the perspective of the barman: The camera zooms on to the woman who was above with Blondie, but she is now in the town square and leaning over Tuco’s hat. The barman quickly offers Tuco a bottle and, to catch his attention, adds, “That, señor, is the best bottle of bourbon within 100 miles . . .” Tuco throws his empty bottle away, reaches out for the bottle offered by the barman and sticks it in his shirt. He says, “Bueno!” He turns around and heads towards the door. The barman glances surreptitiously in the direction beyond the saloon doors. From the perspective of the barman: the town square is empty and the woman has vanished. The barman leans against the bar, as if he is on the brink of syncope.
Town square. Close-up of the hat, then [full shot]. Tuco is seen approaching the hat and bending over to inspect the fruits of his collection. Close-up of the hat: inside the hat there is a cigar butt instead of the money. Tuco slowly takes the butt, sticks it in his mouth and puffs until it glows and smoke appears. He sets the sombrero on his head and heads back to the saloon. Saloon interior. The barman goes behind the bar and tries to reach a backdoor but the voice of Tuco catches up with him: “Come out of there!” Full shot: Tuco appears at the swing doors with a revolver in his hand. The barman emerges from behind the bar, as Tuco mournfully says, “Amigo, your still telling tales at your age . . . take off your trousers.” Tuco takes the cigar out of his mouth and moves towards the barman. The camera travels backwards until Tuco and the barman are no longer in the frame but, instead, the saloon doors. A short scratching and then the sound of a stool falling are heard. Tuco exclaims, “I said, down with your trousers!” The barman screams. It is not difficult to imagine what has just happened. Fade out.





There is a limit of 10000 characters per post. Continued:

Socorro town square. A few young as well as older men emerge from the crowd and gather around the podium, where an officer organizes them into a queue. The speaker’s voice continues to rise, “. . . And the hope of victory will transform to certainty. Your fallen comrades summon you! Those with unshaken hearts and with strength in their arms shall not cower from today’s setback if they want to stride with their heads high tomorrow.” Applause and cheers. The speaker has finished. All of the men who have been convinced by the patriotic frenzy rejoice and some take the flags from the podium which had been flapping in the afternoon breeze.
Close-up of a knothole in a fence. The knothole fills with a dark, glittering and observing eye . . . Under the command of the Confederate officer leading the column, the newly enlisted volunteers march between two rows of women and children, who are waving and sending out kisses with their hands. With high and elated voices the volunteers sing as they march away, sending a whirl of dust up into the air. Fading singing . . . From behind the fence, Tuco is listening to the singing, and then he slips away.
The dust has settled in the town square, as well as the enthusiasm of the women, elderly, and the children, who one by one head back home. Shortly afterwards, all that remains is a decorated podium. Tuco, chewing and spitting tobacco, lethargically approaches the town square and he is towing his horse by the reins. Standing wide-legged and erect, he takes off his sombrero and places it upside-down on the ground. Next, he begins to shout, “Citizens, those of you who have any sense will do the same as me without any discussion about it!” Close shot: He takes out a half silver dollar and holds it over the hat, as he continues, “. . . Come out and pay your share in this hat!” He lets his coin, as an example, fall, and he demands, “So! And hurry up, I don’t have much patience.” The speaker comes out of a door, and with a sense of self-importance he promptly advances towards Tuco and babbles, “What’s all this about? For whom is the money? For our country?” Tuco replies bluntly, “For me!” The speaker retorts, “Get out of here, you and your filthy hat.” The speaker bends over to pick up the hat, but Tuco pushes him flat onto the ground. Even more quickly, Tuco grabs the speaker by the ankles, raises him upside-down above the hat and shakes him. A few coins fall out of the vest of the speaker, while Tuco comments, “You articulate well, speaker. But to lead a war it takes more . . . get out of here! Vanish before I change my mind.” He releases his grip, and the speaker falls and rolls over on the ground.
Tuco heads towards the saloon. From the perspective of the barman: Tuco is approaching, and in the background the speaker can be seen brushing dust from his clothes, before disappearing into a house. At the same time, several doors open and intimidated locals peep outside. As Tuco pushes the saloon doors open, the barman, who has turned pallid, slips out and immediately shows him a coin, stuttering, “I was just about to . . .” Tuco takes the coin out of his hand and sticks it in his shirt. He pokes a finger on the barman’s chest and says, “Bravo, now give me a drink.” A procession of women and eldery are seen in the square depositing their contribution in the hat. Bedroom in the Socorro Hotel. Blondie (seen from the side) is beside the window. He makes a gesture with his hand, indicating that the woman should go, and he demands, “Get dressed!” The woman opens the door and quietly walks out on tiptoe.



37  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: Full Socorro screenplay from original Italian script part 2 on: August 23, 2011, 11:02:58 AM
There is a limit of 10000 characters per post. Continued:

Socorro town square. A few young as well as older men emerge from the crowd and gather around the podium, where an officer organizes them into a queue. The speaker’s voice continues to rise, “. . . And the hope of victory will transform to certainty. Your fallen comrades summon you! Those with unshaken hearts and with strength in their arms shall not cower from today’s setback if they want to stride with their heads high tomorrow.” Applause and cheers. The speaker has finished. All of the men who have been convinced by the patriotic frenzy rejoice and some take the flags from the podium which had been flapping in the afternoon breeze.
Close-up of a knothole in a fence. The knothole fills with a dark, glittering and observing eye . . . Under the command of the Confederate officer leading the column, the newly enlisted volunteers march between two rows of women and children, who are waving and sending out kisses with their hands. With high and elated voices the volunteers sing as they march away, sending a whirl of dust up into the air. Fading singing . . . From behind the fence, Tuco is listening to the singing, and then he slips away.
The dust has settled in the town square, as well as the enthusiasm of the women, elderly, and the children, who one by one head back home. Shortly afterwards, all that remains is a decorated podium. Tuco, chewing and spitting tobacco, lethargically approaches the town square and he is towing his horse by the reins. Standing wide-legged and erect, he takes off his sombrero and places it upside-down on the ground. Next, he begins to shout, “Citizens, those of you who have any sense will do the same as me without any discussion about it!” Close shot: He takes out a half silver dollar and holds it over the hat, as he continues, “. . . Come out and pay your share in this hat!” He lets his coin, as an example, fall, and he demands, “So! And hurry up, I don’t have much patience.” The speaker comes out of a door, and with a sense of self-importance he promptly advances towards Tuco and babbles, “What’s all this about? For whom is the money? For our country?” Tuco replies bluntly, “For me!” The speaker retorts, “Get out of here, you and your filthy hat.” The speaker bends over to pick up the hat, but Tuco pushes him flat onto the ground. Even more quickly, Tuco grabs the speaker by the ankles, raises him upside-down above the hat and shakes him. A few coins fall out of the vest of the speaker, while Tuco comments, “You articulate well, speaker. But to lead a war it takes more . . . get out of here! Vanish before I change my mind.” He releases his grip, and the speaker falls and rolls over on the ground.
Tuco heads towards the saloon. From the perspective of the barman: Tuco is approaching, and in the background the speaker can be seen brushing dust from his clothes, before disappearing into a house. At the same time, several doors open and intimidated locals peep outside. As Tuco pushes the saloon doors open, the barman, who has turned pallid, slips out and immediately shows him a coin, stuttering, “I was just about to . . .” Tuco takes the coin out of his hand and sticks it in his shirt. He pokes a finger on the barman’s chest and says, “Bravo, now give me a drink.” A procession of women and eldery are seen in the square depositing their contribution in the hat. Bedroom in the Socorro Hotel. Blondie (seen from the side) is beside the window. He makes a gesture with his hand, indicating that the woman should go, and he demands, “Get dressed!” The woman opens the door and quietly walks out on tiptoe.



Yeh, I'm still there (-: I wanted to report back once the book was completed, but this is a brief exception. Part 1 of the Socorro description is below:

Socorro town square. We observe a large post, reminiscent of gallows, being erected on a podium. Now, the flag of the Confederates comes into the frame. The camera travels backwards, widening the angle of view, and we see the town square of Socorro. Workers are securing the structure, which initially resembled gallows, and is decorated with Confederate flags. Surrounding the square are low level adobe houses, typical for New Mexico. More and more inhabitants are converging on the scene. Suddenly, a group of gentry emerge, including a Confederate army officer and a pompous 50 year old citizen with a top hat and bow tie. The small group climb onto the podium, and the pompous nobleman begins a patriotic speech aimed at inspiring the young men who are present. The speaker cries out, “Fellow citizens. Friends! . . . I bring you news from the invincible General Sibley, who at this time is based in Albuquerque. Sibley, the man who with less than 3,500 men and in less than three months has raised the Confederate flag in the states Arizona, New Mexico and Texas, has brought me some sad, but not alarming, news.” The camera pans over the crowd as the speaker continues . . . “It is true that the counter-offensive of Colonel Canby is particularly heavy at this point. It is also true that the Union army has much more resources that our’s. Unfortunately, it is also true that Colonel Canby has recaptured Santa Fé, (he raises his voice) but it is absolutely nonsense what some claim, that General Sibley’s troops have been wiped out . . .” Murmurs are heard from the crowd as the speaker continues, “. . . Our soldiers, our brothers, are not fleeing, despite deficient arms and equipment . . . but, instead, they are gradually withdrawing and holding a brave fight, like no others.” Someone in the crowd applauds, as the speaker continues, “We in distant Carolina or distant Virginia are pressing our overbearing and well-planned strategies against the North.” The crowd claps their hands, and the speaker adds, “Our bodies versus their cannons . . .” Further applause. The crowds emotions are intensified: “Citizens . . .” Change of scene.
Saloon and bedroom in Socorro. Blondie is lying stretched out on a bed and tries to allure a tanned and sumptuous woman, as the speaker’s voice intrudes, “. . . General Sibley is calling for men, the commander of the Confederates needs men, and that’s why I am here. I hope that your hearts won’t shun this appeal. Enlist now!” Blondie looks in the direction of the window and says (to the woman), “And I want you here . . .” He indicates to the woman that she should close the window. She gets out of the iron bed, and as she is in the process of closing the window, we hear the last words of the speaker: “ . . . To oppose those who are invading our land and trying to change our way of life, enlist now!” After the window has been closed, there is less light in the room and it is quiet. The young woman returns to Blondie, and opens the last buttons of her corset.









38  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Full Socorro screenplay from original Italian script on: August 23, 2011, 11:00:38 AM
Yeh, I'm still there (-: I wanted to report back once the book was completed, but this is a brief exception. Part 1 of the Socorro description is below:

Socorro town square. We observe a large post, reminiscent of gallows, being erected on a podium. Now, the flag of the Confederates comes into the frame. The camera travels backwards, widening the angle of view, and we see the town square of Socorro. Workers are securing the structure, which initially resembled gallows, and is decorated with Confederate flags. Surrounding the square are low level adobe houses, typical for New Mexico. More and more inhabitants are converging on the scene. Suddenly, a group of gentry emerge, including a Confederate army officer and a pompous 50 year old citizen with a top hat and bow tie. The small group climb onto the podium, and the pompous nobleman begins a patriotic speech aimed at inspiring the young men who are present. The speaker cries out, “Fellow citizens. Friends! . . . I bring you news from the invincible General Sibley, who at this time is based in Albuquerque. Sibley, the man who with less than 3,500 men and in less than three months has raised the Confederate flag in the states Arizona, New Mexico and Texas, has brought me some sad, but not alarming, news.” The camera pans over the crowd as the speaker continues . . . “It is true that the counter-offensive of Colonel Canby is particularly heavy at this point. It is also true that the Union army has much more resources that our’s. Unfortunately, it is also true that Colonel Canby has recaptured Santa Fé, (he raises his voice) but it is absolutely nonsense what some claim, that General Sibley’s troops have been wiped out . . .” Murmurs are heard from the crowd as the speaker continues, “. . . Our soldiers, our brothers, are not fleeing, despite deficient arms and equipment . . . but, instead, they are gradually withdrawing and holding a brave fight, like no others.” Someone in the crowd applauds, as the speaker continues, “We in distant Carolina or distant Virginia are pressing our overbearing and well-planned strategies against the North.” The crowd claps their hands, and the speaker adds, “Our bodies versus their cannons . . .” Further applause. The crowds emotions are intensified: “Citizens . . .” Change of scene.
Saloon and bedroom in Socorro. Blondie is lying stretched out on a bed and tries to allure a tanned and sumptuous woman, as the speaker’s voice intrudes, “. . . General Sibley is calling for men, the commander of the Confederates needs men, and that’s why I am here. I hope that your hearts won’t shun this appeal. Enlist now!” Blondie looks in the direction of the window and says (to the woman), “And I want you here . . .” He indicates to the woman that she should close the window. She gets out of the iron bed, and as she is in the process of closing the window, we hear the last words of the speaker: “ . . . To oppose those who are invading our land and trying to change our way of life, enlist now!” After the window has been closed, there is less light in the room and it is quiet. The young woman returns to Blondie, and opens the last buttons of her corset.









I think if they had showed Wallach the photo of him holding the bartender, and described the rest of the scene, at the very least Eli could tell us what the action was at the end of the scene (i.e. did he burn him with the cigar or not)

Hanley you still out there?HuhHuhHuhHuh I'll pay you $150.00 for a copy of your book! Please don't let all your hard work collecting those interviews and photos go to waste.....


39  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: pic I found.... on: September 16, 2010, 07:14:50 AM
I would think the tough part of the project would be clearing the rights to all the pics. Are you self-publishing, or were you planning to shop the book around to publishers?

The user name Hanley was banned by a program glitch a long time ago. The copyright problem is not so bad. I had to pay fees (including copyright) for a large number of behind-the-scenes and other stills scanned from the original negatives. In the case of other behind-the-scenes stills (not from negative, but very good), there are no copyright concerns. However, all non behind-the-scenes stills plus DVD frames are eligible for copyright charges - the fees for the 50 or so DVD frames are less (US$100 versus $300 per frame) when the book has an educational value, as in "making of . . ." or "film history". All Civil War (comparison) photos are public domain (no copyright issue), although, in most cases, I decided to purchase high quality prints from the Library of Congress.
I will self-publish because it is unrealistic to find an enthusiastic publisher for a book about a single movie. Also, publishers tend to compromise quality (cheap paper, cheap printing, black & white etc) to optimize their profit margin. As soon as I have the book in digital form, I will distribute lots of sample pages, before I make the committed step to print the book (expensive!).
40  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: pic I found.... on: September 16, 2010, 03:02:57 AM
Wish there was a *making of GBU book* to fill in these kind of details...*cough**cough* *hint* hint*
Any chance I'll ever see one?HuhHuhHuh

Once I have final PDF pages, I will post some on the board. I have had the project largely on ice while focusing on my normal work - science is still "publish or perish" these days, but, fortunately, that side is going well. I have accummulated quite a bit of holiday, which I can dedicate to getting the book completed. The first goal will be to get it in electronic form . . . The text is complete, except for quite a few figure legends, the cover is designed, the book chapters are set etc. What I need to do to finish the book is to complete the legends (small job), exchange the DVD images for blu-ray frames (much better quality, but a technical problem at present), and, most importantly, get someone locally to take my rough Adobe InDesign layout and professionally complete the layout (print ready). The looooong time it is taking is more than an embarrassment . . .
41  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: pic I found.... on: September 14, 2010, 06:05:48 AM
The guy leaning over from the right is assistant cameraman Sergio Salvati. Tonino Delli Colli (Dir. of Photography), with Franco Di Giacomo (camera operator) to his back (face not shown),  is holding the Arriflex camera. Serena Canevari (script girl) and Luciano Vincenzoni (script writer; wearing a suit) are seen in the background. The guy out of view holding a TEWE viewfinder is probably the assistant director Fabrizio Gianni. They weren't shooting a scene.
42  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re:the bridge on: April 15, 2009, 02:19:01 AM
Yes, that's the great thing about eye-witness accounts, none of them ever agree. I hope you will give plenty of space to this episode and cover all the variants. The truth is usually somewhere "in between" what everyone says.

Don't worry about the delay. I'll buy your book whenever it comes out: just make sure it's as good as you can make it. Of the 300 pages, are all those pages of text or does that number include photographs? About how many photos will be in it?

There is plenty of cover of the bridge incident. Most pages have 1-2 images (typically 12 cm or 24 cm width), and there are a lot of pages with just stills/photos (whole page still or two stills above each other etc). It won't be long before I post example pages.
43  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re:the bridge on: April 14, 2009, 02:22:17 AM
12 cameras were placed around the GB&U bridge. the bridge was wired to explode by the spanish army. to honor the spanish effort, leone gave the electric push button to a spanish officer. when everything is ready, he gives the sign to start the cameras and then the sign to press the firing button. the officer presses the button and nothing happens.  then a spanish special effects guy takes over, refuses the whole thing. leone gives the sign
and shouts PRONTI ! which means READY in english. the special effects guy thinks PRONTI includes him and presses the igniting button.... the bridge blows up, BEFORE any one of leone's cameras was rolling.   Shocked
benito stefanelli

I asked most of the peolple I interviewed for my GBU book project how it came about that the bridge was blown up before the cameras were on. Everyone gave their own version, typically preceded by something like, "I'll tell you what really happened . . ." There are very diverging versions from Delli Colli, Salvati, Di Giacomo, Baccicucchi, Corridori, Santi, Gianni etc. However, there are some common threads in the different versions. The sequence was well rehearsed but there was an enormous amount of tension. It's correct that a Spanish army officer was given the honor to press the button. There were at least two mishaps. The first time only a small section of the bridge exploded. The second time, the cameras were not on.
Regarding the GBU book project, I apologize for the very very slow progress. Most of the book is now in Adobe InDesign. About 200 pages are done, and I estimate that the book will be about 300 pages long. The format is 26.5 x 28.5 cm.
44  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: Besides LVC, how many other actors from GBU... on: January 13, 2009, 10:46:13 AM
Stefanelli, Muloch, Brega, Brana, Casas are all dead.

The following have also passed away: Petito, Scarchilli brothers, Lorenzon, Novi, Ciavarro, Puppo . . .
45  Films of Sergio Leone / The Good, The Bad and The Ugly / Re: Zwei glorreiche Halunken on: January 12, 2009, 10:33:50 AM
Nope

Der Gute, der Böse, der Hässliche is correct german, and would have been the best way.

Contrary to "Spiel mir das Lied vom Tod", which sounds somehow great in german (and was possibly one of the reasons for the enormous success in Germany), 2 glorreiche Halunken was a rather stupid title and totally inappropiate for this film.

The germans had always a sense for choosing the worst titles in the world. And this is one of the worst.

Good point. Most people in Germany seem to know OUATITW, but very few know the GBU. I agree that the titles made a huge difference.
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