Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
January 20, 2018, 06:54:51 AM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


  Show Posts
Pages: 1 ... 234 235 [236] 237
3526  Films of Sergio Leone / Other Films / Re: The White Buffalo (1977) on: May 16, 2009, 08:23:29 AM
I have no reason not to trust you, AC, but where did the big budget money go? The movie looks cheap.

Bronson must have taken his share, and I suppose Warden was also payed well, but besides them I can't see what could have they possibly spent the millions on. OK, count in the director and the special effects (the carousel WB and the snowy sets), but that's it.
3527  Films of Sergio Leone / Other Films / Re: The White Buffalo (1977) on: May 15, 2009, 04:21:35 PM
Finally got this in watchable form.

I was intrigued by the mystic premise right away. The opening sequence is great: through the mind of Wild Bill Hickok (going under the name James Otis) in some sort of oniric-clarvoyant hybrid sequence, we see The White Buffalo in a savage rampage destroying an Indian village, gruesomely killing everybody in his path, women and children included, and then the spooked Billie-boy waking up, but only after unloading the two barrels of his revolvers in the ceiling of the train.

The opening is followed by a pack of good scenes that definitely show the influence of SW: Hickok/Otis gunning mean pistoleers down, humorous dialogues, finding himself a companion for the White Buffalo hunt - the grumpy old trapper Charlie Zane (played correctly by Jack Warden), their brief occurrence in one of the dirtiest of the dirty saloons, and some rather vulgar and almost out of place whore humor (carried out mostly by the cameo appearance of Kim Novak, that caught off-guard even the otherwise constant Charlie Bronson).

Unfortunately that's about when the fun stops, about 40 minutes from the end of the movie, just when the real hunt for the WB should start in the snowy wilderness, Hick and Zane get involved in a strange racist flavored ménage à trois with the Indian hunter on the quest of valor - Crazy Horse/Worm (played by Will Sampson). In a couple of re-looped cave based love-me/love-me-not scenes they menage to collapse the mythical and mystical feel of the picture, ignore the beautiful snowy landscapes and ultimately make the White Buffalo a cheap and utterly stupid ''boys against the monster'' final fight.

I was really waiting them to explain how come the White Buffalo, a holy spirit of the ancient Native American religion and symbol of good, suddenly went berserk and slaughtered all those people. Turns out they couldn't carry out a simple action packed Western, let alone explain the spiritual implication of the whole business they started.

5/10
3528  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: Moviesceleton graduates on: May 15, 2009, 03:41:46 PM
I was close! Cool
3529  Films of Sergio Leone / Other Films / The Big Stampede (1932) on: May 15, 2009, 03:34:01 PM

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0022681/


TBS is the second of six early black and white 50 - 60 minutes long Westerns, that helped launch the career of John Wayne. In those six movies The Duke is always accompanied by his horse - Duke.

What can I say, it is dumb and funny in its own way. The plot is thin as air, predictable as a Big Mac and linear as a straight line. The Mexicans are portrayed as good guys, and their leader provides a certain dose of comic relief, in that early naive way. As a matter of fact, they're more interesting than the Duke himself (the real one, the horse actually has a couple of nice moves).

Interesting, nothing more I'm afraid. Check it out if you get the chance, but don't expect much.

interesting for Western aficionados / 10
3530  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: Rate The Last Movie You Saw on: May 15, 2009, 09:05:19 AM
Let me introduce you to a radical new concept then: it's called "Cut and Paste."

I've transferred all the posts concerning OFOTCN in a new thread. Figured it would be a shame to lose it all in the dark depths of several hundred pages of RTLMYS.
3531  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) on: May 15, 2009, 08:59:55 AM
See, I think the movie tries to make the case that McMurphy is a guy we should be rooting for. I found him a disgusting miscreant and couldn't find a single reason to throw him my sympathy or even interest. I don't see his brand of self-indulgent anarchy as being any better for the patients than Ratched's strict authoritariansim. On the other hand, Leone makes no pretensions of the MWNN being a heroic character (although he does have some virtuous motivations at times in the trilogy), so I don't see the comparison as valid. And as Jenkins implies, there's the difference between the hero of a social problem film/allegory and a Western.

I see what Tuco is saying but by no means does that mean that I should like or even be interested in McMurphy. I'd probably punch his lights out if I met him in real life. If the characer is supposed to be scum like the Cape Fear protagonists or to a lesser extent MWNN, it's not really a problem. Certainly those characters aren't as obnoxious as McMurphy. Whether that's Kesey or Foreman or Nicholson's fault is open to question, but either way.

I wrote this before reading Groggy's response, so we overlap a bit.

Sure, but there are anti-heroes and there are anti-heroes. When Joe in FOD goes forth it is into a chaos world of lawlessness. And he gives the Rojos and Baxters a strong dose of what they've been giving everybody else. Their passing will make things better, or at least will bring the possibility of a better future. It is not likely that Joe is too concerned about the future of the town (provided we discount the apocryphal ABC prologue), but, nonetheless, his actions will facilitate a transition to an improved society.

Nothing could be more different than the case of R.P. McMurphy. A career criminal, McMurphy has spent his life defying society. No doubt we are intended to view that society as corrupt, but the very fact that places like the institution into which he is placed exist belie the notion. Here is a society that is trying to care for its weaker members. You can argue that the method of caring is not helpful, but what is the alternative? In fact, since the time period of the movie, our philosophy of institutionalized care has changed dramatically. Now, the idea is to institutionalize mental patients as infrequently as possible. The result? Record homelessness. Is one situation to be preferred over the other? The debate continues.

It is not a concern of McMurphy's, of course. He rebels for the sake of rebelling, and is willing to let the chips fall where they may. How nice for him. What about the rest? As Groggy points out, he doesn't exactly do anyone at the institution any favors by enlisting them in his--self-serving--cause. The exception may be the Will Sampson character. The Indian may be the one person who shouldn't be in the place, and through McMurphy's example, finally finds the will to leave. And that may be enough for some viewers of the film.

But the questions Groggy has raised remain. Why should we sympathize with McMurphy (simply because Nicholson's performance entertains us?). Why should we denigrate Nurse Ratched and the institution she represents (what is the real-world alternative?). Should we blame the fates of the other patients on the institution, or does McMurphy himself bear some or all of that blame? The film asks us to think in these terms by the very way it was made: the location shooting was done at a real (or former) facility; the doctors we see in the picture are real doctors, not actors. So our response to this film must be very different to the way we respond to a genre film.

Nice post, Jinkies. I can't say I disagree with any of what you say. Afro

I think the worst thing that Ratched can be accused of is perpetuating a bad system. The only two actions she does in the film that I see as remotely evil, or showing some degree of calculation, are the scene where she refuses to allow the inmates watch the World Series and when she argues against McMurphy's release; otherwise she seems to be a nurse trained in a certain school of psychology and advancing from its principles. Her grudge against McMurphy, while very wrong under the circumstances and considering her position, is understandable, especially considering that McMurphy is a selfish hellion raising hell for its own sake. (I strongly reject the idea that he somehow learns to act altruistically to help the other patients; I see it as him being pissed off that he's committed and can't leave and takes out his rage on Ratched and her cronies.) At worst, Ratched is a martinet who finds herself confronted with a very obvious challenge to her authority and can't handle the situation properly; I strongly disagree with the idea that she's being consciously evil or is (as someone on IMDB described her) a "power-hungry narcissist". And I still fail to see Murphy's alternative as being preferable. The movie stacks the deck to support this argument (to be fair, no moreso than most other social problem films do), but in real-life I doubt too many people would agree that McMurphy's "solution" is any better than what Ratched is doling out. By trying to make the asylum a metaphor for all of society, the message becomes even more garbled and troublesome.

No one knows this better than me. Come hang out on the University of Pittsburgh campus some time and just see how many homeless people, a great many of them mentally defective, are wandering around the campus without supervision or control of any kind, and ask whether their current situation is any better than Ratched's system.
3532  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) on: May 15, 2009, 08:59:37 AM
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - 4/10 - What a load of pretentious, borderline unwatchable horse shit. Nicholson's character is completely unlikeable and I don't see a single reason to find any of his actions admirable or even condonable. Basically he's a criminal who went to a mental hospital because he couldn't hack it in prison, and his great accomplishment is convincing a lot of mental patients to turn violent and ransack the mental hospital for the hell of it. What a great hero. I don't exactly see Nurse Ratched as an evil character either, to be honest; what exactly does she do that's so bad? Try to keep her patients in line? How evil. This movie is very much deserving of a long-winded roasting, and hopefully I'll have time and Internet enough to get around to that later.

FWIU, the movie is very different from the book. So different, in fact, that Ken Kesey, the novel's author, vowed never to watch it. I believe he kept that vow until his death.

boy, talk about mussing the point! Roll Eyes

Please explain, oh great one, what I missed. Some bullshit metaphor equating the mental hospital with American society? How deep.

She breaks the spirits of the patients, doesn't treat them as individuals. How is it pretentious to question authority, especially in that specific era? It's not like the film overshoots its subject matter. X oscar season movie is way more pretentious than OFOTCN could ever dream of being. I gather you hate this film solely because of political reasons

To be fair, if McMurphy weren't such an obnoxious character I might be more amenable to what the film has to say. Ratched isn't exactly a heroic or model character but on the other hand the alternative seems as bad, if not worse

Fistful Of Dollars

Clint Eastwood plays a greedy prick who witnesses a kid get shot at and does nothing to stop it.
He also wears a dirty poncho and probably smells bad too! How could I relate to such a nasty guy?
What a great hero...

Verdict : puerile crap!
1/10

I don't like Fistful of Dollars that much. Nice try though.

Evidently FC has never heard of genres. Well, a one-size-fits-all film crit approach does have the virtue of simplicity


I think R.P. McMurphy can count as an anti-hero, no?

I never thought OFOTCN was a full-blown masterpiece, but it is without any doubt a great study of human psychology, and furthermore institutions... and many more things. It's too bad it sometimes turns unsubtle in order to deliver the message(s), but I guess it had to be that way in the time it was made. I've never read the book but I doubt it can be that superior.

The character of McMurphy is, IMO, not heroic nor anti-heroic. He's merely someone who saw the opportunity to try to change something working in his own way, and make a benefit for himself in the process. As seen in the first episode he does it for his own amusement. He has psychological problems, whether they're more or less serious I couldn't tell, I'm no expert, but he has them, be sure about it. The beauty of his character is that you really can't tell for sure. You know what I mean, he's the guy in your street that is something of a town's fool, but everybody likes in some way, that you don't know if he's really 100% crazy, or merely crazy with episodes from time to time, or drunk, or just pretending all because of his strange sense of humor. You must have met him at some point of your life. I can't recall seeing a so trusty representation of this kind of person in any movie I've seen.

Nurse Wretched-Ratched is probably the most disgusting, venomous, malicious and mean loser seen holding a higher hierarchy position in the history of cinema. How she manipulates and feeds on the misery of those poor patents, thus subjugating them to the system that needs them to survive, but really more to relieve herself from the pain of her subliminal complexe(s), is ingenious as it is nefarious. The worst part of her character is the fact that she doesn't even have the dignity to do it openly, but hiding behind her silver badge. What a pathetic fungus.


7. 5 / 10
3533  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: The Thing (1982) on: May 15, 2009, 08:48:25 AM
That's what I remember too. The dog infects one person, and then after Dr. Blair finds through his studies that the deformed body mass is not completely dead, one guy soon gets infected by the remains of that.

But, it seems that part of the monster I'm talking about gets away in the beginning:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6g5Txe8H6Z4 (at 4:54)

So, I don't understand, is it a bad cut, something went wrong during the shooting or just an error in the script?


From what I can remember that part of the monster never returns. Well, until the very end of the movie, when it's battling MacReady near the generator, but even then we can't be sure what part is it.

It is also unclear how Dr. Blair gets infected, it would be logical that he got infected while touching the infected flesh he was performing studies on, but then again it could be that part that got away that infected him...
3534  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: Moviesceleton graduates on: May 15, 2009, 08:30:14 AM
On a scale as follows: L > E > M > C > B > A > I
I got:
Finnish:..L
English:..L (I know it sounds impossible given that even my username is misspelled)
Swedish:E
History:..M
Math:.....A

I'm trying to figure the pattern in this grade system of yours but it just doesn't make any sense...

Are the big letters initials of numbers from 1 to 7?


Congratulations! Afro
3535  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: The Thing (1982) on: May 14, 2009, 10:24:22 PM
One thing has been bugging me a couple of days and can't find the answer... I'd have found it already, except I don't own a DVD of John Carpenter's TT...

In the first scene when the ''thing'' gets out from the dog, near the end of the scene, just before he gets torched, one part of him detaches from what's left of the 'dog' and two 'arms' reach for the sealing trying to escape. Now, do they burn that part of him with the rest or he escapes and comes back later? I seem to remember the characters getting infected by the rest of that Norwegian crew they returned with after the expedition, or by the rest of the poor dogs...

?
3536  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: Rate The Last Movie You Saw on: May 14, 2009, 10:05:46 PM
This thread ate so many good discussions that should have been in proper substantive topics...
3537  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: Rate The Last Movie You Saw on: May 14, 2009, 09:59:01 PM
I never thought OFOTCN was a full-blown masterpiece, but it is without any doubt a great study of human psychology, and furthermore institutions... and many more things. It's too bad it sometimes turns unsubtle in order to deliver the message(s), but I guess it had to be that way in the time it was made. I've never read the book but I doubt it can be that superior.

The character of McMurphy is, IMO, not heroic nor anti-heroic. He's merely someone who saw the opportunity to try to change something working in his own way, and make a benefit for himself in the process. As seen in the first episode he does it for his own amusement. He has psychological problems, whether they're more or less serious I couldn't tell, I'm no expert, but he has them, be sure about it. The beauty of his character is that you really can't tell for sure. You know what I mean, he's the guy in your street that is something of a town's fool, but everybody likes in some way, that you don't know if he's really 100% crazy, or merely crazy with episodes from time to time, or drunk, or just pretending all because of his strange sense of humor. You must have met him at some point of your life. I can't recall seeing a so trusty representation of this kind of person in any movie I've seen.

Nurse Wretched-Ratched is probably the most disgusting, venomous, malicious and mean loser seen holding a higher hierarchy position in the history of cinema. How she manipulates and feeds on the misery of those poor patents, thus subjugating them to the system that needs them to survive, but really more to relieve herself from the pain of her subliminal complexe(s), is ingenious as it is nefarious. The worst part of her character is the fact that she doesn't even have the dignity to do it openly, but hiding behind her silver badge. What a pathetic fungus.


7. 5 / 10
3538  Films of Sergio Leone / Other Films / Re: Sergeant Rutledge (1960) on: May 14, 2009, 04:58:00 PM
Watched it today for the first time and didn't like it much. Very little (and pretty much lame) Western action, in pack with the courtroom scenes that are involving and fluid as Rigor Mortis. I hate to admit it but I also didn't much like Woody. I don't know, maybe because of the pretentious ''We're doing a big Western movie about racial issues you know, but don't you worry, everything might just turn OK in the end, because justice always wins! (winky - winky)'' tone to the whole movie.

What I hate to admit even more is that I appreciated the bad comedy elements in the courtroom scenes: the judge demanding 'water', Billie Burke's little puritan show (''My mother would turn in her grave if she saw me alone in a room with so many men!'' to paraphrase her), and stuff like that.


5 (maybe 5.5) / 10

3539  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: Big Trouble in Little China (1986) on: May 14, 2009, 04:28:33 PM
Nah, I'll wait for the SHER.
3540  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: Big Trouble in Little China (1986) on: May 14, 2009, 11:05:35 AM
Got the DVD as a present a few days ago, don't know what was I thinking not to buy it myself. Not very original but highly entertaining. One of those movies that are perfect for growing up watching them.

8/10


I often asked myself whatever happened to Dennis Dun? He had a good roll from the late 80s to the early 90s with a couple entertaining flicks and became somewhat of a fans favorite, often playing this ''little cowardish but witty Oriental character'', and then he suddenly disappeared from the scene. I know he was in a few other things later, as says IMDB, but unfortunately (or not?) I haven't seen any of those.

(I'm not saying he was a great actor, but he had a unique charm and presence. I'm sure most people will agree with that.)
Pages: 1 ... 234 235 [236] 237



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.044 seconds with 18 queries.