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61  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / French Neo-Noir:The Beat That My Heart Skipped (2005) on: May 14, 2017, 04:54:25 PM

7

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Taking part in a poll on ICM on the best films of 2005,I started looking for French flicks from the year. Avoiding the movie due to the twee title,I was surprised to discover that the film was not a Romance,but a remake of 1978's Fingers (which I've not yet seen) that led to me catching up to the beat.

The plot:

Joining his dad Robert in business by beating up people who turn down deals,Thomas Seyr gets involved with pals Fabrice and Sami in setting up dodgy real estate deals. Becoming fully involved in a daily life of crime after his classical pianist mum died 8 years ago,Thomas is woken up when he crosses paths with his mums former manager,who asked Thomas if he has ever considered playing classical music,which makes Thomas play a new tune to his life.

View on the film:

Working as a director for hire, (producer Pascal Caucheteux wanted to do another remake after producing the US remake of Assault on Precinct 13) co-writer/(with Tonino Benacquista) director Jacques Audiard & cinematographer Stéphane Fontaine fluidly play Neo-Noir notes spun from up close,documentary-style "shaky" camera moves pushing the viewers nose into Thomas's grey and grime crime world. Backed by a warm score from Alexandre Desplat,Audiard finely tunes the darkness with shots of lights,as side shots of Thomas playing captures the notes in life Thomas is trying to hit,as his artistic dreams are plucked by the family life of crime.

Changing the plot after co-writer Benacquista said he hated Fingers, (what a perfect choice to write the remake!)the writers wonderfully string Thomas as a loner in a constant search to find a place to fit in,with a Neo-Noir self-contempt making Thomas believe that he must follow his dad's footsteps. Focusing on the relationship between Thomas and music,the writers wonderfully contrast between the music hall lights that Thomas escapes to,with the vicious,daily grind of his Noir life of crime. Joined by a great support cast that includes Anton Yakovlev as Minskov and Mélanie Laurent as Minskov's Girlfriend, Romain Duris (who got taught by his sister to play the piano for the film) gives an excellent performance as Thomas,which flows with the dream optimism of a new life,which Duris grinds down with a nose to the grindstone suspicion from Thomas that a finally piece has been written for his life.

62  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / French Noir: Deadlier Than The Male (1952) on: May 13, 2017, 07:55:54 PM

 "Better a widow than a divorcée."

10

 * This review may contain spoilers ***

With most of the family on holiday,I realised that I could catch-up on some long awaited viewings. Reading excellent comments on the title from fellow IMDber dbdumonteil,I decided to discover how much deadlier auteur Julien Duvivier could make things.

The plot:

Divorced from his wife Gabrielle for over 20 years, André Chatelin has poured his heart and soul into becoming the greatest chef in Paris,with even the President going for regular meals at Chatelin's café. Whilst clearing up,Catherine walks in. Not having seen Gabrielle's for over 20 years,Catherine reveals to Chatelin that she has recently died,and that she herself is Gabrielle's daughter. Bringing Catherine into the business, Chatelin starts finding Catherine placing romantic feelings on him. Whilst Chatelin takes everything at face value,Catherine starts cooking up a scheme that will reveal her to be deadlier than the male.

View on the film:

Opening with a crane shot sweeping up the streets of Paris, co- writer/(with Charles Dorat/Maurice Bessy and Pierre-Aristide Bréal) directing auteur Julien Duvivier & Henri-Georges Clouzot's regular cinematographer Armand Thirard pull the viewer into the dirty side streets with a glistening "evil under the flames" aura being cooked up in the kitchen between Chatelin and Catherine, which spills over in dazzling pre-French New Wave outdoor shooting,which gives Chatelin's battles for Catherine an on the spot urgency. Served in just under two hours, Duvivier grills his unique Film Noir style with a rich canvas of lingering murky shadows and transfixing tracking shots,which sway on the pessimism seeping into Chatelin's "image" of Catherine.

Giving the viewer the opportunity to taste Chatelin's Noir meals,the screenplay by Duvivier/Bessy and Bréal fully explore the relationships in brilliantly subtle gestures,via the almost- son/dad bond between Chatelin and Gérard Delacroix breaking down into Noir loners fighting in the streets,and Catherine's humble,pristine image being chipped away to unveil the heart of a Femme Fatale. Keeping her real hand out of sight,the writers smartly spend the first hour threading a bond between Catherine and Chatelin that shines with some glimpses of sincere love,which wilts away into the Noir tar that Catherine tries to keep out of Chatelin's sight.

Shimmering into Chatelin's kitchen, Danièle Delorme gives an exquisite performance as Catherine,whose Femme Fatale mind games are given an earthy veneer by Delorme that tug at the heart strings of Chatelin,and shake up the Angry Young Man tension within Gérard. Giving his exchanges with Gérard (played by a great Gérard Blain) a parental warmth,Jean Gabin gives an extraordinary performance as Chatelin. Constantly seeing the burnt embers of past romantic relationships,Gabin catches the youthful excitement that surrounds Chatelin in a new romance,but is unable to escape the Noir loner wriggling unease that Catherine has a hidden side that is about to steam up.

63  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Brit Noir: The Dark Man (1951) on: May 10, 2017, 05:02:37 PM

Thanks to Jess,whose Brit Noir comments got me to check this rare movie out.

7

* This review may contain spoilers ***

After watching a trio of titles,I began talking to someone on a Fistful of Leone about British Film Noir,which led to me checking various lists. Catching a glimpse of her in the easy-going British Comedy Operation Bullshine,I realised that my dad had recently picked up a rare Barbara Murray Noir,which led to me meeting the dark man.

The plot:

Successfully killing his target and the cab driver,"The Dark Man" finds his identity to get uncovered,when actress Molly Lester drives pass as he kills the taxi driver. Suspecting that a double murder has taken place, Detective Inspector Viner starts searching for any clues to the suspect. Recognising Lester's face on a stage poster,Dark Man starts making plans for Lester's final performance.

View on the film:

Encouraging Lester to not focus on the "strange" events recently taking placing around her, Barbara Murray gives a charming,Diva- style performance as actress Carol Burns,whilst future Dr.Who William Hartnell gives the title a good dose of gruffness as a Superintendent. Lingering in the shadows, Maxwell Reed gives a menacing performance as The Dark Man,who pulls the raw nerves of Natasha Parry's fraught Lester.

Mostly keeping The Dark Man in long shadows,writer/director Jeffrey Dell & cinematographer Eric Cross undermine their attempt to create a mysterious mood by openly showing his face for the whole double murder. Shot on location along the south coast of England,Dell releases a superb,crisp Film Noir atmosphere,where the camera pans across an entire beach,and spots The Dark Man looking over Lester's shoulder. Shading corner of the sets in Film Noir low-lighting for The Dark Man to hide in,Dell cleverly uses real buildings at the location to give a depth of field to the Film Noir paranoia,with the lights from a lighthouse being cast across the sands and lining it in ultra-stylised black and white patterns,as The Dark Man loses his shadow.
64  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Nordic Noir- Department Q:The Absent One (2014) on: May 08, 2017, 04:28:33 PM

9

* This review may contain spoilers ***

Nearing the end of the magnificent second series of the Nordic Noir TV show Follow The Money,I started to read the Nordic Noir book Mercy (Department Q 1)by Jussi Adler-Olsen. Looking for more info on Olsen's work,I checked online,and found three Department Q adaptations. Deciding to not watch Mercy until I finished the book,I got set to meet the absent ones.

The plot:

At an office party,police officer Carl Mørck is approached by an old man who asks if Mørck's Department Q has look into the cold case related to the death of his children. Feeling uneasy round him, Mørck gets the guy thrown out. Later that night, Mørck learns that the man has killed himself. Regretting his words, Mørck and fellow officer Assad open the files on the dead man's twins,and discover a murderous class from twenty years ago, who are now in the top class of society.

View on the film:

Going back and forth over 20 years, the screenplay by Nikolaj Arcel & Rasmus Heisterberg gaze upon the "murderous boarding school" sub- section of the Giallo genre,where the students are taught a vicious Noir arrogance that is left to fester for 20 years. Along with the school antics giving their Jussi Adler-Olsen adaptation a visceral edge,the writers strike the present with a deep Nordic Noir pessimism,as Mørck and Assad's investigation leads to an intense unlocking of the business elite (a major theme of the genre) ) that sets alight a superb,grim final page for Department Q.

Looking towards the Giallo,director Mikkel Nørgaard & cinematographer Eric Kress take advantage of the school setting for a slice of sleaze,via the fading gold colurs of the flashbacks being torn with naked girls,masked thugs and deep red blood being rubbed on the screen. Limiting any bright lights to the past, Nørgaard makes the teams investigation one that smashes the pristine glass world of the killers,to expose the moulding blacks and greens under the surface.

Years before putting on the mild-manner business glasses of Simon in Follow the Money,David Dencik gives a wonderful, uncomfortably meek performance as Ulrik Dybbøl,whilst Sarah-Sofie Boussnina gives an excellent,ticking time bomb performance as Kimmie. Attemping to learn what took place 20 years ago, Nikolaj Lie Kaas and Fars Fares give great,burnt-out,Nordic Noir loner performances as Mørck and Assad,who both meet the chosen ones.

65  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / French Noir: Eaux profondes (1981)/Patricia Highsmith's Deep Water. on: April 22, 2017, 04:13:30 PM

Hi all,for the last week or so my viewings have dried up due to taking care of ill family members,but I recently caught this superb French Neo-Noir.

10

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

After the earthy Neo-Noir Coup de torchon exceeded all my expectations,I decided to see if lead actress Isabelle Huppert made any other titles in 1981. Always looking out for Patricia Highsmith adaptation since seeing The Talented Mr.Ripley in the early 2000's,I was thrilled to stumble on an adaptation with Huppert,which led to me dipping into the pool.

The plot:

Nearing their 8th wedding anniversary, Vic Allen nonchalantly accepts the "open" state of his younger wife Melanie's side of the marriage. Bringing any guy back home who takes her fancy,Vic watches on as Melanie gets close to each new lover. Wanting to "joke" around with the guys,Vic tells them a story about how he one time killed a former lover of Melanie. Seeing little point in keeping the marriage going,Melanie starts making divorce plans so that she can get together with her new lover. Fearing that Melanie is about to leave,Vic pushes his previously nonchalant side over the deep end.

View on the film:

Drawing every guy with her gaze, Isabelle Huppert gives an entrancing performance as Melanie,whose flirting Huppert gives a relaxed nature to,which Huppert sharply balances by giving Melanie icy, Femme Fatale nails that scratch at Vic's attempt to stop Melanie getting her "toy." Watching his wife make out, Jean-Louis Trintignant gives a wonderful performance as Vic,who initially acts just a bit too friendly towards everyone. Keeping the anxiety in the marriage simmering away, Trintignant shatters Vic's calm with a calculating Noir loner manner that uncoils as Vic gets Melanie's lovers in his grasp.

Backed by a deliciously brash Jazz score,co-writer/(with Florence Delay and Christopher Frank) director Michel Deville & cinematographer Claude Lecomte whirl Film Noir chic with the dazzling style of the Giallo. While Vic and Melanie hit a dark stage in their marriage, Deville lashes the screen in vibrant reds and Giallo yellow that give the title a sweet pulp atmosphere. Cracking the relaxed shell of Vic, Deville hits the screen with ultra- stylised,scatter-shot whip-pans and razor sharp editing stabbing the murderous calculations Vic has made.

Swimming in Patricia Highsmith's novel,the screenplay by Delay/ Frank/Deville cleverly give the couple a "free love" appearance for the opening,which subtly pulls the viewers guard down. Slicing into the Noir decay of the marriage,the writers brilliantly burn layer by layer the facade Vic has made Melanie believe,as Vic sets his sights on the designated victim.

66  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / French Neo-Noir Coup de torchon (1981)/Jim Thompson's Pop 1280. on: April 17, 2017, 06:37:07 PM

There are DVDs of it with no subs,but Criterion have put it out on a now oop DVD:

https://www.amazon.fr/Coup-Torchon-Criterion-Collection-Zone/dp/B000059H7Q/ref=sr_1_9/260-7039368-6442020?s=dvd&ie=UTF8&qid=1492475592&sr=1-9&keywords=Coup+de+torchon

9

*** This review may contain spoilers ***

Despite seeing his name mentioned in connection with French cinema for a number of years,I've never had the chance to see a work from auteur Bertrand Tavernier. Getting set for a poll on the best films of 1981 on ICM,I took a look at French movies from the year,and was thrilled to spot to see Tavernier take on Jim Thompson!,which led to me flying the coup.

The plot:

1938-A French colony in West Africa.

Being one of the few "symbols" of law and order in the colony,police officer Lucien Cordier shows a disregard for the powers which matches the state of his personal life,where his wife Huguette has invited a "fake brother"/lover round to live with them,and Cordier himself tries starting an affair up with Rose Mercaillou. Treating black people as lower than dirt, Cordier overlooks any misdeeds with the mere fistful of a bribe. Annoyed at two pimps questioning his power,Cordier asks for advice from fellow officer Marcel Chavasson,who tells him to "act forcibly" which leads to Cordier using a bit too much force in the colony.

View on the film:

Appearing in Cordier's life like a flower in the desert, Isabelle Huppert gives an impeccable performance as Rose Mercaillou,with Huppert giving Rose pointed petals which get burnt by the simmering Noir frustrations of Cordier. Keeping her other lover secret, Stéphane Audran gives a great, consistently changing performance as Huguette Cordier,whose flirting with the toyboy Audran turns to stone at the mere whiff of her husband Lucien.

Stomping round the colony like a crusty warthog, Philippe Noiret gives a magnificent performance as Lucien Cordier. Wanting to do as little work as possible,Noiret gives Cordier an unsettling casual attitude to fights on the street,and signs of annoyance at even the suggestion of helping out black people in the colony. Taking officer Chavasson's advice, Noiret sands down to the Neo-Noir veins of Cordier,that are pulled with a friction over Cordier overstepping in the land.Dissecting the original US setting for a French African colony,co- writer/(with Jean Aurenche) director Bertrand Tavernier & cinematographer Pierre-William Glenn retain the Noir roots with a blistering evil under the sun atmosphere, that makes the sights of the local mob and Cordier gunning his own brand of justice clear to see,in the cold light of day.

Shot on location, Tavernier seeps the Noir mood with the grit and dry blood of the colony in elegantly held tracking shots following Cordier's descent into vicious contempt.Moving from the Deep South of Thompson's book,the screenplay by Bertrand Tavernier and Jim Thompson takes the racism over to deepest West Africa,where the horrific treatment Cordier and the whites lash out cover the screen in Noir vile. Filling Cordier's hands with dirty money that gets him to turn a blind eye,the writers brilliantly chip away at Cordier way of life and unveil a nihilism that Cordier is unable to drop back into the water and hide from the colony pop 1280.
67  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Brit Noir:Contraband (1940)-With Link. on: April 17, 2017, 06:17:03 AM

Full film:

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6hWV6cOHOyA

7

 *** This review may contain spoilers ***

Taking part in a poll on ICM for the best films of 1940,I started to look at lists for movies that came out in the year. Enchanted by their work since seeing the sadly underrated Gone to Earth,I was thrilled to discover a Powell/Pressburger work,which led to me covering the windows for a blackout on contraband.

The plot-

1939:

While Denmark remains neutral in the Phoney War-stage of WWII,Danish captain Anderson is surprised to receive an order from Lt. Commanders Ashton and Ellis to go to a British Contraband Control Port,so that an inspection can be carried out. Getting set to go ashore as the inspection is done,Anderson's pass (and boat) is taken by secret agents Mrs. Sorensen and Mr. Pidgeon,who set sail to give the government info that the Nazis want blacked out.

View on the film:

Known for the immortal nightmare image in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Conrad Veidt gives a delicious performance as Anderson,with the romantic glances Anderson gives Sorensen allowing Veidt to show a romantic flamboyance with a real relish. Running with a dashing Esmond Knight as Mr. Pidgeon, Valerie Hobson gives an enticing performance as Sorensen. Coming faced to face with the Nazis,Hobson gives Sorensen a considerate thoughtfulness,that unrolls itself as Sorensen tries to get contraband under the Nazis noses.

Originally planned as a follow-up to The Spy In Black, the screenplay by co-writer/(along with Emeric Pressburger & Brock Williams) director Michael Powell sails on creepy Spiv espionage and playful Caper romance. Making their first title for the WWII effort,the writers present a surprisingly unsettling view of Britain,where Nazis and British spies lurk on every street waiting to spot a weakness. Staying away from going too grim,the writers give Sorensen a patriotic slickness that undermines every attempt from the boo-hiss Nazis.

Hitting the high seas with most of the crew from The Spy In Black,director Michael Powell & cinematographer Freddie Young cast a chilly atmosphere with thick smog allowing the contraband to be kept from the eyes of the enemy. Whilst being very early in the Powell/Pressburger relationship,Powell displays a remarkable confidence in smashing the budget/sets limit in an ultra-stylised manner,as shot statues,overlapping eyes and invisible ink notes reveal Sorensen's contraband.
68  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Brit Noir:Yellow Canary (1943)-With Link. on: April 16, 2017, 05:57:00 AM

Hi all,I hope you are having a good weekend,and here is an Easter treat!

Full film:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51wz67pab2M

7

** This review may contain spoilers ***

After an impressive run for most of 2016,I've been disappointed that the BBC have been showing less of the more obscure RKO creations. Taking a quick look at the film section on BBC iPlayer,I was thrilled to see that they had unearthed a rare RKO British Spy flick,which led to me getting this canary out of the pit.

The plot:

Going deep undercover for the British, blonde Sally Maitland boards a ship to Canada. On the ship Maitland meets Jan Orlock,who unknown to Maitland has been secretly sent to protect her. During the journey,the ship is stopped by a Nazi heavy cruiser that kidnaps Orlock,which leads to Maitland realising how deep in the pit of espionage this yellow canary is.

View on the film:

Flying in during the war,director Herbert Wilcox (who would soon get married to the star!) & cinematographer Mutz Greenbaum are unable to fully shake off the limitations of the times,with scenes in trains and chases being played out stage-bound instead of the great outdoors. Working within the limitations, Wilcox and Greenbaum display sharp eyes for building a Spiv atmosphere with stylised shots seeding doubt on who side Sally Maitland is on,from impressive tracking shots that go down every level of the boat,to overlapping shots following Sally's double dealing.

Partly based on the real Hitler devotee Unity Mitford,the screenplay by P.M. Bower/Miles Malleson and DeWitt Bodeen delivers a clear message of the British public needing to be on the lookout for Nazis in their midst. Following Wilcox's path,the writers cut through the propaganda with an impressive level of ambiguity Spiv Film Noir,via allowing Sally to swing the pendulum of trust between the Nazis and the British. Pulling the feathers in every scene, Anna Neagle gives a fantastic performance as Sally,thanks to Neagle subtly using facial expressions to give doubt over which side this canary sings for.

69  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: Brit Noir: One Way Out (1955)-With link. on: April 15, 2017, 07:02:20 PM
Hi Jess,for Brit Noir I've discovered that someone has made an IMDb list of over 350 British Noir's:

 http://www.imdb.com/list/ls070730241/

And I've also found a book on the subject,that looks at over 300 Brit Noir titles:


British Film Noir Guide

https://www.amazon.co.uk/d/Books/British-Film-Guide-Michael-Keaney/0786464275


Morrison, a list of Brit Noir would be much appreciated.
70  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Cold Comes the Night (2013) on: April 15, 2017, 03:54:35 PM

7

** This review may contain spoilers ***

After seeing her in the superb 2010 indie films Please Give and Everything Must Go,I went on Netflix UK to find other movies starring Rebecca Hall. Whilst looking up Hall flicks,I spotted a (non Hall) Neo-Noir on the front page that I remember reading a very good review by Kim Newman a few years ago,which led to me finding out how cold the night could be.

The plot:

Taking care of her daughter Sophia on her own after her husband dies in an accident,Chloe makes ends meet by running a motel. A former girlfriend of police officer Billy,Chloe keeps him informed of all the pimps and gangsters that stay at her cheap place. Getting the cash for their client "transporter" Topo and a relative hide it in their car,and each get a separate room at Chloe's. Meeting a call girl,Topo's relative gets in a row which leaves him shot dead. Finding out the next day that the cops have taken the car as evidence,Topo takes Chloe hostage,and demands that she gets this transporter back on track.

View on the film:

Referencing the title,co-writer/(with Oz Perkins and Nick Simon) director Tze Chun & cinematographer Noah Rosenthal give title a frosty appearance reflecting the cold harsh light of day that the crimes take place in. Cracking open Topo's task with short,sharp shots of violence,Chun peels Chloe's motel walls for a seedy Neo- Noir atmosphere,where the limited room in the place feeds into a cramped feeling.

Keeping Topo as a man of few words,the screenplay by Chun/ Perkins and Simon drills a menacing Noir loner aura into him,as Chloe tries to find common ground with Topo,but discovers his backstory to constantly escape her. Although they melt the ice for an ending that is far too sickly sweet,the writers do very well at layering the Noir anxiety that sits between Chloe and Topo,as Topo's ruthless threats force Chloe into accepting the package of becoming a transporter.

Hiding behind cool shades, Bryan Cranston gives a tense performance as Topo,who is given a tough edge by Cranston of believing that the way of the gun is better than any words. Pulled out of her confined safe space, Alice Eve gives a gripping performance as Chloe,thanks to Eve at first sending Chloe out shivering like a leaf,but slowly turning Chloe into a quick-witted outsider,as coldness enters the night.

71  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: Brit Noir: One Way Out (1955)-With link. on: April 15, 2017, 03:53:15 PM

 Hi Jess,I hope you are having a good Easter weekend,and over the last month or so I've seen some other less-known Brit Noir that I'll sort out the links to/put notes on over the next few days.


I'll check it out too. It sounds good.

I agree we need more lesser-known Brit Noir recommendations.


Hi Jess,I hope you are having a good Easter weekend,and over the last month or so I've seen some other less-known Brit Noir that I'll sort out the links to/put notes on over the next few days.

72  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: Brit Noir: One Way Out (1955)-With link. on: April 14, 2017, 05:31:45 PM
Great,hope you enjoy it CJ.
73  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Brit Noir: One Way Out (1955)-With link. on: April 14, 2017, 04:41:38 PM

I hope everyone has a happy Easter holiday.

Full film: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptuHvS8fxxs

6/10

** This review may contain spoilers ***

With Easter coming up,I started looking for movies to watch with my dad during the Easter holidays. Impressed by his work on the Hammer Noir Cloudburst,I was pleased to learn that a DVD seller had recently tracked down a "quota quickie" by Francis Searle,which led to me finding the exit for a viewing.

The plot:

After spending his life working in the force, Supt. Harcourt starts looking forward to retirement. Unknown to Harcourt,his daughter Shirley crosses paths with crime boss John Chandos. Learning of what Shirley has been caught up in,Harcourt sees for the first time that the one way out,is to cross the thin blue line.

View on the film:

Driving by in 58 minutes,director Francis Searle & cinematographer Walter J. Harvey find the door to a rustic Film Noir atmosphere with location shooting (and the Hammer studio Bray) breathing in the London fog,and corned shots giving the buildings a burnt out appearance. Joined by a surprisingly strong-armed Arthur Lowe as Sam, Jill Adams gives this short and sweet flick Femme Fatale elegance as Shirley Harcourt,who Adams shows has a deep fear of being stuck in the deep end. Despite the short run time,the screenplay by Jonathan Roche/Jean Scott Rogers and John Temple-Smith disappointingly fails to pick up the pace,by giving Supt. Harcourt search to clear his daughter an oddly relaxed,casual feel,as Supt. Harcourt finds the one way out for Shirley.
74  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: So Dark the Night (1946) on: February 25, 2017, 02:49:02 PM
Yes, great call on Geray. You got a review of Blind Spot for me? I seem to remember mdf watched it, wasn't it subject to cuts or something?

Hi Spike,you are remembering correctly,the YT etc prints of Blind Spot have 10 mins or so cut.


 
75  Other/Miscellaneous / Off-Topic Discussion / Re: What Film Noir did you see: February/March Edition. on: February 24, 2017, 12:16:54 PM
i had posted this on the IMDB board, but did not get any replies.


(8/10)

Hi Pimpin,hope things are going well post-IMDb,and thanks for posting your very good review.Along with the praise you gave Bob,I was wondering how Charlotte Rampling is as a Femme Fatale here?

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