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 21 
 on: October 15, 2017, 04:44:21 PM 
Started by cigar joe - Last post by cigar joe
we can probably add Dead Man to the list. Others The Last Hunt, Track Of The Cat maybe too.

 22 
 on: October 15, 2017, 04:41:19 PM 
Started by cigar joe - Last post by cigar joe
Some people consider Johnny Guitar a noir, too.

What do you consider a Western noir? Is it subject matter - every revenge Western? Or is it cinematography? If cinematography, you can even stretch it to My Darling Clementine and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

Anyway, every Western noir (as well as every Western non-noir) has its own thread in the American Western Index or Spaghetti Western Index.

I'd say a combo of subject and cinematography.

 23 
 on: October 15, 2017, 04:39:38 PM 
Started by cigar joe - Last post by drinkanddestroy
Saw this (second viewing) on TCM.

I like this movie. I give it a 7.5/10

I'm a huge Henry Fonda fan. The tutoring/mentoring bit can be a bit heavy-handed at times, but generally this is pretty good.

The potentially great gag of the doctor rolling into town for his own birthday and he's dead, is ruined, because the movie implies in the strongest possible terms that the doc will be dad. If the movie had not told us beforehand that the doc was already dead - and it wouldn't have taken too much imagination to have it done properly - it could have been a great gag.

One of the best things about this movie is the incredibly amazing cinematography.

 24 
 on: October 15, 2017, 04:38:50 PM 
Started by cigar joe - Last post by cigar joe
Strange list ...

They Came to Cordura? Come on ...



It's a pretty bleak Western ever watch it?

 25 
 on: October 15, 2017, 04:14:12 PM 
Started by cigar joe - Last post by drinkanddestroy
Some people consider Johnny Guitar a noir, too.

What do you consider a Western noir? Is it subject matter - every revenge Western? Or is it cinematography? If cinematography, you can even stretch it to My Darling Clementine and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

Anyway, every Western noir (as well as every Western non-noir) has its own thread in the American Western Index or Spaghetti Western Index.

 26 
 on: October 15, 2017, 03:37:52 PM 
Started by cigar joe - Last post by stanton
A List

Blood On The Moon (1948)

Pursued (1947)

Man Of The West (1958)

Station West (1948)

The Secret of Convict Lake (1951)

Day of the Outlaw (1959)

They Came to Cordura (1959)

Two Rode Together (1961)

Lonely Are the Brave (1962)

Hud (1963)

Ride in the Whirlwind (1966)

The Great Silence (1968)

McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)


Strange list ...

They Came to Cordura? Come on ...


 27 
 on: October 15, 2017, 01:04:29 PM 
Started by morrison-dylan-fan - Last post by morrison-dylan-fan

Seen on TV. 6

** This review may contain spoilers ***

Recently re-watching the enjoyable Gris title A Touch of Larceny,I started looking for other easy-going Gris/Thrillers starring James Mason.Whilst searching round,I found that the BBC were showing a Thriller with Mason,which led to me reserving a viewing.

The plot:

Seeing war on the horizon in 1938, Peter Vadassy decides to apply for French citizenship,whilst going on a photographing holiday and staying at the remote Hotel Reserve. Going to collect his latest photos,Vadassy is gripped a spy who says photos of French military installations have been found on his camera. Taking a closer look,Vadassy discovers that a fellow guest has secretly switched his camera. Freed,Vadassy is told he must find out who took the photos,at the Hotel Reserve.

View on the film:

Taking not one,but three directors to make (!),the mix of the trio leads to a constantly unsettled changing of tone. Put together by editor Sidney Stone,the film darts between a murky Spiv tale and a jet-set Thriller abrasively, with it going from stylishly low shadows and seeping steam,to the light-Thriller sunny outdoors with no shading of dour darkness intact. Being the main person who almost keeps things together, Lennox Berkeley delivers an excellent score, (he sadly only did 4 scores) which pounds on the anxiety and unease of Vadassy's secret mission.

Going into the hotel from Eric Ambler's book Epitaph For A Spy, John Davenport (who was literary editor of "The Observer newspaper) casts an eye on espionage in tense exchanges between Vadassy and his fellow guests at the hotel,with the clipped exchanges between them all signalling hidden secrets. Finishing Vadassy's mission with a twist that would later be used in a large number of Gialli, Davenport cleverly makes the twist work by having Vadassy casually build the wrong impression in swift asides. Joined by a simmering Herbert Lom and elegant Patricia Medina as Andre and Odette,James Mason gives a terrific,dashing performance as Vadassy,who spies on the hotel reserves.

 28 
 on: October 15, 2017, 11:41:50 AM 
Started by cigar joe - Last post by cigar joe
A List

Blood On The Moon (1948)

Pursued (1947)

Man Of The West (1958)

Station West (1948)

The Secret of Convict Lake (1951)

Day of the Outlaw (1959)

They Came to Cordura (1959)

Two Rode Together (1961)

Lonely Are the Brave (1962)

Hud (1963)

Ride in the Whirlwind (1966)

The Great Silence (1968)

McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)

 29 
 on: October 15, 2017, 09:39:14 AM 
Started by PowerRR - Last post by noodles_leone
Mindhunter - Season 1 episodes 1 to 3 8/10

Great Netflix show produced and co-directed (4 episodes out of 10) by David Fincher. Each episode so far is a 50 minutes masterclass in the lost arts of cinematography, blocking, production design, editing, actor direction and dialogues.
The show focuses on 2 FBI detectives in 1977 who try to push their puritan institution towards modern psychology and profiling to catch serial killers ("sequence killers", actually, since the phrase hasn't been invented in 1977). Just like in Zodiac but in a deeper way, the whole thing is the perfect excuse for Fincher to scrutinize the dichotomy of American society. Without ever forcing it down your throat, each societal layer and paradox is examined by his crystal clear (almost scientific) lens while his heroes lose themselves in their obsession.
This is real David Fincher stuff, which may be why it's much more promising than House Of Cards.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gZCfRD_zWE

 30 
 on: October 14, 2017, 08:09:19 PM 
Started by PowerRR - Last post by cigar joe
Carny (1980) Directed by Robert Kaylor with Gary Busey, Jodie Foster, Robbie Robertson, Meg Foster, Kenneth McMillan, Elisha Cook Jr., A nice surprize, a film about carny life that stayed interesting. Currently on Youtube 7/10

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