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December 12, 2018, 09:34:47 PM
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 41 
 : December 07, 2018, 03:50:56 AM 
Nobody - titoli
I just found a quotation from Peckinpah who thought the novel was a masterpiece and the film "pure shit".

 42 
 : December 07, 2018, 02:34:36 AM 
PowerRR - XhcnoirX
Suspiria (2018): Dakota Johnson joins a female-only dance company in 70s Berlin, while an aging psychotherapist tries to find one of the troupe's girls, who was delusional and then disappeared. It has its moments (altho few and far between), and Tilda Swinton excels as the troupe's choreographer (as well as playing the (male!) psychotherapist, and another smaller part), but it really didn't need to be 2.30h long. Still need to see the original, shame on me. 6/10

 43 
 : December 07, 2018, 12:30:48 AM 
drinkanddestroy - Big Boss 1971
Dynamite Kid , part of the legendary British Bulldogs.....amazing talent but outside the ring he was often an a-hole

 44 
 : December 07, 2018, 12:27:53 AM 
PowerRR - Big Boss 1971
Dec 4 : Where Eagles Dare 50
Dec 8 : Deer Hunter 40
Dec 10 : Superman 40

Saw GBU , Planes trains automobiles, Home Alone 1 & 2 and Superman '78 in cinema recently , all classics (HA was outdoor , a chilly experience.......hadnt seen #2 in cinema since '92)

 45 
 : December 06, 2018, 11:09:05 PM 
drinkanddestroy - drinkanddestroy
https://variety.com/2018/film/news/golden-globe-nominations-2019-1203082075/

Best Motion Picture – Drama
“Black Panther”
“BlacKkKlansman”
“Bohemian Rhapsody”
“If Beale Street Could Talk”
“A Star Is Born”

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

Glenn Close (“The Wife”)
Lady Gaga (“A Star Is Born”)
Nicole Kidman (“Destroyer”)
Melissa McCarthy (“Can You Ever Forgive Me?”)
Rosamund Pike (“A Private War”)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Bradley Cooper (“A Star Is Born”)
Willem Dafoe (“At Eternity’s Gate”)
Lucas Hedges (“Boy Erased”)
Rami Malek (“Bohemian Rhapsody”)
John David Washington (“BlacKkKlansman”)

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
“Crazy Rich Asians”
“The Favourite”
“Green Book”
“Mary Poppins Returns”
“Vice”

Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Emily Blunt (“Mary Poppins Returns”)
Olivia Colman (“The Favourite”)
Elsie Fisher (“Eighth Grade”)
Charlize Theron (“Tully”)
Constance Wu (“Crazy Rich Asians”)

Best Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

Christian Bale (“Vice”)
Lin-Manuel Miranda (“Mary Poppins Returns”)
Viggo Mortensen (“Green Book”)
Robert Redford (“The Old Man & the Gun”)
John C. Reilly (“Stan & Ollie”)

Best Actress in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Amy Adams (“Vice”)
Claire Foy (“First Man”)
Regina King (“If Beale Street Could Talk”)
Emma Stone (“The Favourite”)
Rachel Weisz (“The Favourite”)

Best Actor in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Mahershala Ali (“Green Book”)
Timothee Chalamet (“Beautiful Boy”)
Adam Driver (“BlacKkKlansman”)
Richard E. Grant (“Can You Ever Forgive Me?”)
Sam Rockwell (“Vice”)

Best Motion Picture – Animated
“Incredibles 2”
“Isle of Dogs”
“Mirai”
“Ralph Breaks the Internet”
“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse”

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language
“Capernaum”
“Girl”
“Never Look Away”
“Roma”
“Shoplifters”

Best Director – Motion Picture
Bradley Cooper (“A Star Is Born”)
Alfonso Cuaron (“Roma”)
Peter Farrelly (“Green Book”)
Spike Lee (“BlacKkKlansman”)
Adam McKay (“Vice”)

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture
Alfonso Cuaron (“Roma”)
Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara (“The Favourite”)
Barry Jenkins (“If Beale Street Could Talk”)
Adam McKay (“Vice”)
Peter Farrelly, Nick Vallelonga, Brian Currie (“Green Book”)

Best Original Score – Motion Picture
Marco Beltrami (“A Quiet Place”)
Alexandre Desplat (“Isle of Dogs”)
Ludwig Göransson (“Black Panther”)
Justin Hurwitz (“First Man”)
Marc Shaiman (“Mary Poppins Returns”)

Best Original Song – Motion Picture
“All the Stars” (“Black Panther”)
“Girl in the Movies” (“Dumplin’”)
“Requiem For a Private War” (“A Private War”)
“Revelation’ (“Boy Erased”)
“Shallow” (“A Star Is Born”)

Best Television Series – Drama

“The Americans”
“Bodyguard”
“Homecoming”
“Killing Eve”
“Pose”

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama
Caitriona Balfe (“Outlander”)
Elisabeth Moss (“The Handmaid’s Tale”)
Sandra Oh (“Killing Eve”)
Julia Roberts (“Homecoming”)
Keri Russell (“The Americans”)

 Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama

Jason Bateman (“Ozark”)
Stephan James (“Homecoming”)
Richard Madden (“Bodyguard”)
Billy Porter (“Pose”)
Matthew Rhys (“The Americans”)

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy

“Barry” (HBO)
“The Good Place” (NBC)
“Kidding” (Showtime)
“The Kominsky Method” (Netflix)
“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” (Amazon)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Kristen Bell (“The Good Place”)
Candice Bergen (“Murphy Brown”)
Alison Brie (“Glow”)
Rachel Brosnahan (“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”)
Debra Messing (“Will & Grace”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

Sacha Baron Cohen (“Who Is America?”)
Jim Carrey (“Kidding”)
Michael Douglas (“The Kominsky Method”)
Donald Glover (“Atlanta”)
Bill Hader (“Barry”)

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
“The Alienist” (TNT)
“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story” (FX)
“Escape at Dannemora” (Showtime)
“Sharp Objects” (HBO)
“A Very English Scandal” (Amazon)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Amy Adams (“Sharp Objects”)
Patricia Arquette (“Escape at Dannemora”)
Connie Britton (“Dirty John”)
Laura Dern (“The Tale”)
Regina King (“Seven Seconds”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Antonio Banderas (“Genius: Picasso”)
Daniel Bruhl (“The Alienist”)
Darren Criss (“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”)
Benedict Cumberbatch (“Patrick Melrose”)
Hugh Grant (“A Very English Scandal”)

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Alex Borstein (“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”)
Patricia Clarkson (“Sharp Objects”)
Penelope Cruz (“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”)
Thandie Newton (“Westworld”)
Yvonne Strahovski (“The Handmaid’s Tale”)

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Alan Arkin (“The Kominsky Method”)
Kieran Culkin (“Succession”)
Edgar Ramirez (“The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story”)
Ben Whishaw (“A Very English Scandal”)
Henry Winkler (“Barry”)

 46 
 : December 06, 2018, 02:01:30 PM 
dave jenkins - cigar joe
At MoMA, an Ugo Tognazzi retro: https://www.moma.org/calendar/film/5023?locale=en

Anything worth seeing here?

I've seen La Grande Bouffe and La Cage aux folles, La Cage aux folles is funny, don't remember the first one very well

 47 
 : December 06, 2018, 09:00:20 AM 
dave jenkins - dave jenkins
At MoMA, an Ugo Tognazzi retro: https://www.moma.org/calendar/film/5023?locale=en

Anything worth seeing here?

 48 
 : December 06, 2018, 06:36:06 AM 
Cusser - Cusser
I also appreciated a few things that did have bearing on the plot. When Mr. Arthur gets ready to take his stand against the marauding (very non-PC) Sioux, he first hobbles his horse. That is, he binds the forelegs together, so the horse won't run off when the shooting starts. How often have you seen this in a Western? I have seen a couple of instances where a horse runs off because the animal wasn't hobbled--incompetent cowboys being everywhere, apparently, in the American West--but I can't remember an example of a guy who has the foresight and competence to prevent such a thing from happening. Even better was the fact that when the Indians charge, their horses routinely trip on the uneven ground (as was nicely prepared for by the introduction of the prairie dogs). Typical of crappy Westerns is the idea that all ground is level and horses can sail across it and never put a foot wrong. I liked the idea that things are not so smooth in real life, and that a clever Indian-fighter might take advantage of his terrain to even a contest where he is outnumbered. Of course, it helps to have a repeating rifle as well.

Mrs. Cusser has a horse, and is knowledgeable, and she brought this up as well.  Horse riders don't tie a horse up by the reins, or leave him all day at a hitching post saddled up like it seems in westerns.  Horses drink a ton of water too, and eat a lot.  Remember - Mrs. cusser is the one who told me that the mule in "Fistful" was actually just a real ugly horse.

Even Tuco doesn't appear to water his horse for the desert.

 49 
 : December 05, 2018, 04:06:57 PM 
cigar joe - moorman
Not too bad.  Basic plot but well shot film. I love Jay Novello.  It was good seeing a young Charles Bronson also.  Sterling Hayden as a cop was different.  He was pretty good as usual. I rate this a 7 out of 10...

 50 
 : December 05, 2018, 09:28:37 AM 
Cusser - noodles_leone
Talking with friends and colleagues about this film (this is the hot "watercooler topic" at my place of business), I was reminded of the many things about "The Gal Who Got Rattled" that I like. I've mentioned already how effective a piece of narrative it is because you never know what to expect as you go along--so rare in a film these days. But equally noteworthy are the many touches or details in the segment that contribute to a sense of 19th Century reality. One that I particularly like is the bit with the unnamed young boy who says he has decided to walk backwards all the way to Oregon. The mother tells him not to do it--she doesn't give him a reason, just an order. The boy is slow to comply--the father walks over, gives him a wack, and says, "Do what your mother tells you." This has nothing to do with the story, but nicely evokes wagon-train life (also, the fact that the people generally walk alongside their animals instead of riding them seems true-to-life).

I loved that as well. It's even more obvious in the Tom Waits short: most of the screen time is devoted to show us what's gold digging, in a very concrete way. For most of the film, the Coens teaching us how that job works is the closest we have from a "plot".


I also appreciated a few things that did have bearing on the plot. When Mr. Arthur gets ready to take his stand against the marauding (very non-PC) Sioux, he first hobbles his horse. That is, he binds the forelegs together, so the horse won't run off when the shooting starts. How often have you seen this in a Western? I have seen a couple of instances where a horse runs off because the animal wasn't hobbled--incompetent cowboys being everywhere, apparently, in the American West--but I can't remember an example of a guy who has the foresight and competence to prevent such a thing from happening. Even better was the fact that when the Indians charge, their horses routinely trip on the uneven ground (as was nicely prepared for by the introduction of the prairie dogs). Typical of crappy Westerns is the idea that all ground is level and horses can sail across it and never put a foot wrong. I liked the idea that things are not so smooth in real life, and that a clever Indian-fighter might take advantage of his terrain to even a contest where he is outnumbered. Of course, it helps to have a repeating rifle as well.

This kind of ideas is what the Coens have been working on for their action sequences for years, if not decades. Their masterpiece, in that respect, is No Country For Old Men. It seems to me they learned a lot about how to achieve it on No Country, and they now almost always flawlessly deliver on action sequences, even in less action focused films.

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