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November 12, 2018, 11:41:21 PM
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 71 
 : November 01, 2018, 02:54:07 AM 
stanton - stanton
Meanwhile The Westerner is out on DVD, and it includes the pilot, which was shot over a year before the series got into production. I really love it.

For those who want more Peckinpah than a better world can bear there is more to find on Youtube. All his episodes of The Rifleman can be viewed there. Peckinpah wrote the pilot and the 2nd episode (both directed by Arnold Laven) and directed 4 others. It is series about the Ben Hur syndrome, about a man who preaches peace but still kills a lot of guys in every episode. Quite violent for a 50s show.
Less profiled than The Westerner, but also quite interesting, with intense dialogues, occasional offbeat character developments and, yes again, the will to alter screen violence.

Also The Losers (with Lee Marvin), his re-thinking of The Westerner, is now on the Tube, albeit in bad picture quality.

 72 
 : November 01, 2018, 02:37:48 AM 
Herry Grail - stanton
For me the GBU book was not worth the high price.

I won't buy this one for such a high price, unless I think it is really something special. Well I thought that about the GBU book also ...

 73 
 : October 31, 2018, 09:54:11 PM 
kjrwe - kjrwe
Time to get this thread out of mothballs.

It's been awhile since I've watched any mysteries.

Yesterday I watched the 1971 TV movie "They Call it Murder".

This movie is the only adaptation of a Doug Selby mystery. The Doug Selby mysteries were written by the same author as the Perry Mason books, but unfortunately, Doug Selby is almost completely forgotten, while Perry Mason lives on.

To my knowledge, there are nine Doug Selby mysteries. I've had the pleasure of reading three of them. All of them should be reprinted and filmed.

A pity that all the novels weren't filmed back in the early seventies. Not sure why only the one movie was made. It's maybe a bit on the slow side, but a good story. Jim Hutton's perfect as Doug Selby. Leslie Nielsen is great in a supporting role. He sure had a good voice for film. The others were well cast, too.

 74 
 : October 31, 2018, 09:48:34 PM 
moorman - kjrwe
Terrific film. At least they showed gangsters in a reasonable way, as compared to something like "The Public Enemy", where the toughest gangster looked like a gum-chewing high school student. (I still like that film, but really....)

The heist sequence (with no music) is absolutely brilliant.

 75 
 : October 31, 2018, 07:26:43 PM 
Herry Grail - Jordan Krug
It's gotta be some sort of rights issue over the photos or something like that. It seems like the book would have had to have been completed a while back for them to meet their much earlier publishing dates. But this is pure speculation on my part. Oh well, if we can wait as long as we did for the amazing gbu book, we can wait a bit longer for this one.

 76 
 : October 31, 2018, 10:55:46 AM 
Herry Grail - Le Bon
On Amazon UK it now has March 19 and price up again to £50.  My pre order was £32.50 then it went up to £44 last week. Not had any emails from Amazon myself.

 77 
 : October 31, 2018, 08:37:29 AM 
Dust Devil - Novecento
Yes, but this is probably only about anamorphic systems, for the 1,85:1 of Touch of Evil he could use the same cameras and lenses as before.

I agree. So it doesn't confirm things either way since he could simply mask it to 1.85:1 (as he was most likely preparing for whether he preferred it or not), but his comment regarding "visual conventions" does hint toward a preference for 1.37:1 unless he's talking about the effect of these "new" cameras on depth of image or anamorphic distortion or the like.

Iíve heard people say it was shot for 1,37:1...

Probably as a result of the letter by Welles above, but as Stanton rightly points out, it's not conclusive but merely suggestive.

 78 
 : October 31, 2018, 05:56:13 AM 
Dust Devil - stanton
Nowadays the eye is tamed, I think, by the new wide screens. These 'systems' with their rigid technical limitations are in such monopoly that any vigorous use of the old black -and-white, normal aperture camera runs the risk of seeming tricky by comparison. The old camera permits use of a range of visual conventions as removed from 'realism' as grand opera. This is a language not a bag of tricks. If it is now a dead language, as a candid partisan of the old eloquence, I must face the likelihood that I shall not again be able to put it to the service of any theme of my own choosing. [/b]



Yes, but this is probably only about anamorphic systems, for the 1,85:1 of Touch of Evil he could use the same cameras and lenses as before. None of Welles films was shot in 2,35:1, but all of his later ones are composed for the European 1,66:1 format.

 79 
 : October 30, 2018, 07:23:35 PM 
Dust Devil - Novecento
ORSON WELLES LETTER TO THE NEW STATESMAN - LONDON
REGARDING TOUCH OF EVIL


May 24, 1958

Sir:

Without being quite so foolish as to set my name to that odious thing, a 'reply to the critic', perhaps I may add a few oddments of information to Mr. Whitebait's brief reference to my picture TOUCH OF EVIL (what a silly title, by the way; it's the first time I've heard it). Most serious film reviewers appear to be quite without knowledge of the hard facts involved in manufacturing and, especially, merchandising a motion picture. Such innocence, I'm sure, is very proper to their position; it is, therefore, not your critic I venture to set straight, but my own record. As author-director I was not and normally would not be-consulted on the matter of the 'release' of my film without a press showing. That this is an 'odd subterfuge', I agree; but there can be no speculation as to the responsibility for such a decision.


As to the reason, one can only assume that the distributor was so terrified of what the critics might write about it that a rash attempt was made to evade them altogether and smuggle TOUCH OF EVIL directly to the public. This is understandable in the light of the wholesale re-editing of the film by the executive producer, a process of re-hashing in which I was forbidden to participate. Confusion was further confounded by several added scenes which I did not write and was not invited to direct. No wonder Mr. Whitebait speaks of muddle. He is kind enough to say that 'Like Graham Greene' I have 'two levels'. To his charge that I have 'let the higher slip' I plead not guilty. When Mr. Greene finishes one of his 'entertainment's' he is immediately free to set his hand to more challenging enterprises. His typewriter is always available; my camera is not. A typewriter needs only paper; a camera uses film, requires subsidiary equipment by the truck-load and several hundreds of technicians. That is always the central fact about the film-maker as opposed to any other artist: he can never afford to own his own tools. The minimum kit is incredibly expensive; and one's opportunities to work with it are rarer less numerous than might be supposed. In my case, I've. been given the use of my tools exactly eight times in 20 years. Just once my own editing of the film has been the version put into release; and (excepting the Shakespearean experiments) I have only twice been given any voice at all as to the 'level' of my, subject matter. In my trunks stuffed with unproduced films scripts, there are no thrillers. When I make this sort of picture -- for which I can pretend to no special interest or aptitude -- it is not 'for the money' (I support myself as an actor), but because of a greedy need to exercise, in some way, the function of my choice: the function of director. Quite baldly, this is my only choice. I have to take whatever comes along from time to time, or accept, the alternative, which is not working.


Mr. Whitebait revives my own distress at the shapeless poverty of Macbeth's castle. The paper mache' stagy effect in my film was dictated by a 'B-Minus' budget with a 'quickie' shooting schedule of 20 days.. Returning to the current picture, since he comments on the richness of the urban scenery of the Mexican border' perhaps Mr. Whitebait will be amused to learn that all shooting was in Hollywood. There was no attempt to approximate reality; the film's entire 'world' being the director's invention. Finally, while the style of TOUCH OF EVIL may be somewhat overly baroque, there are positively no camera tricks. Nowadays the eye is tamed, I think, by the new wide screens. These 'systems' with their rigid technical limitations are in such monopoly that any vigorous use of the old black -and-white, normal aperture camera runs the risk of seeming tricky by comparison. The old camera permits use of a range of visual conventions as removed from 'realism' as grand opera. This is a language not a bag of tricks. If it is now a dead language, as a candid partisan of the old eloquence, I must face the likelihood that I shall not again be able to put it to the service of any theme of my own choosing.


ORSON WELLES
ROME

 80 
 : October 30, 2018, 04:12:53 PM 
dave jenkins - drinkanddestroy
Whitey Bulger, Boston gangster, found slain in prison at 89

https://apnews.com/40ec3f0b0a1d47369e1e9ce5eaaba019

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