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« on: September 22, 2011, 09:52:40 AM »

Brute Force (1947) by titoli: I don't know if this was the first prison movie to feature a sadistic warden in a prominent role, but Hume Cronyn's character is the only credible one in this flick . The inmates are all good samaritans who did wrong out of generosity of love toward their companions (Ella Raines is the best looking of the lot, as usual). Probably the torture scene and the Lancaster escape attempt are worth watching but even an older movie like I Am a Fugitive From a Chain Gang is head and shoulder above this.  5\10



dave jenkins Quotes titoli on February 28, 2011, 01:59:27 PM
The inmates are all good samaritans who did wrong out of generosity of love toward their companions.
You're not buying that one? Huuuuuhhhhh?

titoli Quote dave jenkins on March 01, 2011, 09:46:54 AM
You're not buying that one? Huuuuuhhhhh?

I could, but not 4 times out of 4.

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« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2013, 08:40:46 PM »

Just saw this movie on TCM. I give it a 7.5/10


As for titoli's complaint about the 4 prisoners acting out of generosity toward their loved ones, I don't have a problem with it, because it's not like the movie is saying they are good guys. All the movie is saying is, there is a reason why they did their crimes, and showing us the reason. And even in real life, there is a reason why people commit crimes. In some cases they are are just plain evil souls, and in other cases perhaps it's someone who never imagined he could do something like that but was driven out of desperation - which doesn't excuse the action one iota. So, they're showing the backstory of these characters, and besides, I don't think they are saying they are all basically good guys. The guy who got his wife the fur coat, he is presented as basically a good guy but driven to commit crimes cuz of his life to his wife. But his actions aren't excused - it's not like he was about to die of starvation; he wanted to keep his wife by buying her the finer things, and he turned to crime to do it. They're not making any excuses for him.
As for Soldier, it is never explained what he is in for - during the war, he first got in trouble for sneaking food to his girl, but after that, he just said he couldn't stay out of trouble. So, we don't know exactly what he is in for now, but there's no implication that he doesn't deserve to be here in prison now.
The Lancaster character has a girlfriend in a wheelchair, but it is pretty clear from his persona that he is a career criminal. Now he hopes to help her, but that is not the reason why he turned to crime, I think it's pretty clear from that he is a career bad guy.
 As for the other guy, you just see his backstory of that one incident where the girl robbed him; we don't really know what he is in for. But, he frequents gambling halls, says that he had just scammed a guy that nite, and carries a gun, so I think we can assume he ain't a good guy either.
As for the black guy, I don't recall if we hewar about his backstory; we he keeps talking about this girl he loves, but I don't recall if we see the circumstances surrounding his crime and imprisonment.

So, I would disagree with what titoli said that the movie presents all the prisoners there as basically being good guys who were driven to crime out of a desire to help others. It's a cast of characters who all committed crimes for various reasons and no excuses are made for any of them.

To me, the one character I found totally unrealistic was the warden. I mean, Thank God I've never actually met any prison wardens, but at least based on movies (and on what i assume the world is like?) I can't imagine there would be a warden that feeble. Wardens may not all be mean nasty evil guys like in The Shawshank Redemption, but no way could a warden be as weak and scared as the one here.

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« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2017, 02:36:13 PM »

“Those gates only open three times. When you come in, when you've served your time, or when you're dead!”

Brute Force was directed by Jules Dassin for independent producer Mark Hellinger’s production company. It was Hellinger’s follow-up to his hit film The Killers which had introduced his discovery Burt Lancaster to the movie-going audience. Unfortunately the hard-living, hard-drinking Hellinger died just six months after the premier of the film of a heart attack at the age of 44.
Brute Force was also the first Noir - and big success - of socially conscious, left-wing director Dassin. His career in the US was to be a short one. Following Brute Force he made two more socially critical movies and found himself quickly in hot water.
Never shy about expressing his politics, barely two years later he ran foul of HUAC and during the Committee hearings it was Edward Dmytryk, a member of the “Hollywood Ten” who became a friendly witness, who gave Dassin’s name to the Committee. His testimony was damning enough to sink Dassin’s career. In 1949 Dassin left the US for fear of being blacklisted. He eventually became a successful director in Europe but never returned to Hollywood.

The cast is uniformly excellent, down to the smallest parts. This film doesn’t just belong to its star Lancaster or to the frighteningly effective Cronyn, it benefits from a great ensemble cast which includes Howard Duff, Charles Bickford, Whit Bissel, Jay C. Flippen and many other well-known supporting actors.

The plot of the movie is pretty straightforward. Joe Collins (Burt Lancaster), after 10 days in solitary because of a frame-up, decides he’s had enough of prison life. The sadistic Captain Munsey (Hume Cronyn playing against type) terrorizes the inmates and is making life a living hell for all of them. Together with his cell mates from R17 Joe plans the escape. Unfortunately they have a traitor in their midst who leaks information to Munsey. Joe finds out but is so desperate to escape that he insists the breakout go through anyway. He simply doesn’t care which way it ends.
Lancaster appears for much of the picture without his shirt on and as always he’s incredibly intense and seething with barely contained rage. He’s a born rebel who has no intention of giving in to Munsey’s authoritarianism. Even solitary confinement can’t break him. Everything about him is tense, like a tight-wound coil about to spring. He’s the everyman fighting against an overpowering system.

From the beginning the futility of the breakout is foreshadowed. Even when Lancaster becomes aware of the fact that Munsey is on to them, he still insists on going through with their plan. It’s suicidal, but his rage is too big. The accumulated tension can only be released in a violent and bloody finale, a massacre.

The violence was pretty nasty and shocking for its time and three scenes still stand out to this day: the inmate revenge on the stoolie who framed Lancaster. With blowtorches he’s backed into a massive machine press; the infamous rubber hose scene and the punishment of the screaming traitor by tying him to a rail car in the end.

Brute Force relies heavily on the use of Noir fetish elements. A ticking clock underscores the importance of time racing on, never standing still until the bitter end when time and luck finally run out. The pouring rain that beats down relentlessly fills the movie with an overwhelming sense of despair, futility and soul-sucking hopelessness which eventually builds to a violent climax that's still shocking today.

The movie feels very claustrophobic for obvious reasons. In the opening shot we’re introduced to Westgate Prison, a huge, grim and foreboding structure with an almost medieval aura that is enhanced by the presence of a drawbridge. It’s a horrendous overcrowded place run by a sadistic lunatic, “one big human bomb ready to explode”.

Hume Cronyn almost steals the show as the sadistic Captain Munsey. Of small stature, he is very soft-spoken and slightly effete, a power-hungry psychopath with an ice-cold cruelty. The prison warden, whose position Munsey covets, is utterly weak and spineless. Munsey’s game is to discredit him so he can take over. “I just want to help the warden…He doesn’t know that kindness is actually weakness”. He runs the prison more like a concentration camp, inhumane and brutal. Munsey’s uniform is clearly reminiscent of SS uniforms, it gives him license to abuse his absolute power. Prisoners’s activities are taken away, parole hearings are suspended and no visitors are allowed. By psychological or physical torture he means to break the prisoners, but not all of them can be broken.
One of the most horrifying scenes has Munsey, wearing a wifebeater and suggestively stroking a rifle, torturing a prisoner with a rubber hose to classical music (Wagner of course!). It plays like a homoerotic S & M sequence.

Brute Force owes a lot to WB message pictures of the 30s, when movies about men doing hard time were incredibly popular. Depression era audiences liked seeing prisoners “sticking it to the Man” and gaining a victory over authority.
The prison movie was never understated in its message pushing of social responsibility and understanding. It certainly isn’t here. But Brute Force goes a step further. The producers hit the audience over the head with their Nazi analogy. In the context of the times this is clearly not surprising and perfectly understandable, but it’s all handled without much subtlety. We can choose who Munsey represents: Hitler, Mussolini, Franco, McCarthy…take your pick. HUAC noticed too.

The PCA didn’t particularly appreciate this depiction of an authority figure as corrupt. The Code had decreed that institutions of law should never be portrayed in a negative light, a restriction Hellinger bent mightily. But it has to be stressed that Munsey is the sole villain of the  piece. Clearly Dassin and Hellinger meant the single guard to stand in for the institutionalized cruelty of the entire prison system but this being 1947, it was clear that Hellinger had to compromise. Criterion Collection’s DVD booklet reprints a bitter but fascinating exchange between Hellinger and Joseph Breen about the PCA’s censorship. Hellinger felt that the “guts” of his picture was gone. Had it not been for the Code, the outcome of this movie could have been even grimmer.

Munsey’s opponent, the spokesman for liberal society, is the nice old prison doctor, full of the milk of human kindness but a hopeless, defeatist and ineffectual drunk. He’s full of good intentions, but without action. His constant pleas for compassion, human rights and understanding are a bit too pat. They come off as piously moralizing. Nowadays I’d file it under bleeding heart liberal talk.

The portrayal of the prisoners is certainly heavily tinged with Dassin’s left-leaning philosophy. The inmates all seem to be basically good guys trapped by circumstances in unbearable situations. None of their crimes suggest unpardonable evil, there are no junkies, sadists, rapists, child murderers or psychos in the prison. It’s good inmates vs bad guards, a setup we’ll find again in The Shawshank Redemption. The pure-at-heart are practically martyrs held hostage by Snidely Whiplash.
Whit Bissel is only a small-time embezzler, Duff took the murder rap for his wife and Lancaster is a nice upstanding guy in love with a girl in a wheelchair. One wonders why these guys are in a maximum security prison anyway. Quite a few critics noted that the inmates’s brotherhood dynamic plays out more like prisoners in a POW camp. They’re right on the money. The inmates aren’t criminals, they’re soldiers captured by an evil enemy whose duty it is to escape.
To even further humanize, not to say sentimentalize, the prisoners, we get to hear their backstories told in flashbacks. Reviewers criticized that the flashbacks take away from the claustrophobia, the continuity and feel shoehorned in so the studio could display some of its beauties. But the flashbacks are kept mercifully short, about three minutes, so it’s OK with me.
Again, we’re left with the dilemma of portraying the protagonists as essentially good men, and yet insisting that their forgivable criminal acts be punished. In essence, none are allowed any leniency from the powers at the PCA. Any kind of lasting victory for the inmates is obviously not possible.

The good vs bad set-up is frankly too simplistic. What’s missing is a hefty dose of moral ambiguity, even if Dassin wanted to drive his point home. It strains credulity to the max, and problematically doesn’t make the picture more moral, just more black and white.

But Brute Force is Noir all the way through. In the end it’s clear that there is no escape, no redemption and no hope for anyone. The ending is truly nihilistic, the gang is dead, Munsey is dead, other prisoners and guards are dead too. The escape was all for nothing. The explosion of pent-up hatred consumes everybody, yet the prison walls never open.
The last couple of minutes get a little preachy again with the doc’s speech: “Nobody escapes. Nobody ever really escapes.” But despite his sermonizing, he also sums up the nature of Noir in a nutshell.

Still extremely gritty and hard-hitting today, but I’d give it only an 8.5/10 due to preachiness.

« Last Edit: May 02, 2017, 12:21:11 PM by Jessica Rabbit » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: May 03, 2017, 03:19:22 AM »

Great read, Jessica!  Afro I dvr'd this on TCM,  but chose to watch immediately over the other 35 movies that are now my DVR, because I saw you posted a review and wanted to watch the movie before I read it  Wink I saw this movie once before, a few years ago.

I disagree with you about it being preachy (except the last lines by the doctor).  I also disagree with you that this movie is clear-cut black-and-white with prisonors as "good guys." The prisoners generally did commit crimes clearly, but did it for reasons we can sympathize with – which is the very definition IMO of a "gray "character, rather than black and white. Stealing a fur coat for your wife is not GOOD, it is (in a movie context) gray.

As for the ending, I think it is great that nobody survives. That is the point: There are no happy endings when you live in a Fascist regime. The "good guys" die. The bad guys die. Everything goes to hell. Having a happy ending with the guys escaping would have killed the movie.

I disagree with your criticisms but anyway I give the movie 8/10

By the way, only the soldier is a real "good guy" (but for the minor "crime" of black marketeering). The others clearly committed crimes - for reasons we can sympathize with - but crimes nonetheless.

And the point is that  however guilty these men may be, they are nowhere near as bad as the Establishment or the government or the Fuhrer or whatever.

 I hear your point about how the movie could have been made better if they were allowed to make the entire staff be as cruel as Munsey.  But while, the doctor and the warden are decent (albeit very weak) people, it is not true that Munsey is the only cruel staff member: Many of the guards are vicious as well.  In fact, perhaps it is the very point that while Munsey is the only bad guy from the top staff members, he was the one with the real power: The nice/weak guys eventually get kicked out, and the cruel, vicious guys wind up with the power.

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« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2017, 05:33:55 AM »

A personal favourite.

Prison Noir!

This is Westgate Penitentiary, the Warden is a weak man, the prison is practically run by the cruel and highly ambitious Captain Munsey. But the prisoners are no walk overs, they deal their own justice to those that don't tow the line, tired and fed up of mistreatment, and fuelled by the Munsey influenced suicide of a popular inmate, the prisoners, led by big Joe Collins, plot a break out, the fear of failure not even an option.

Brute Force is a cracking moody picture directed with innovation by Jules Dassin and starring Burt Lancaster (brilliant as Joe Collins), Hume Cronyn (Munsey), Charles Bickford (Gallagher) and lady support (shown in excellent flashbacks) from Yvonne De Carlo, Ann Blyth, Ella Raines and Anita Colby. We open in the pouring rain at the monolithic gates of Westgate Penitentiary, Dassin's camera looking up at the gate like some foreboding warning, William Daniels black and white photography is stark and making its point, all this as Miklos Rozsa's score thunders in our ears, it's clear that this is going to be a mean and moody prison picture.

So it proves to be, sure all the formula traits that lace most prison films are in here, but Dassin and his team have managed to harness an oppressive feel to put us the viewer within the walls of Westgate as well. This is a bleak place, there are six men to a prison cell, their only chance of staying sane is memories of loved ones and a unified spirit to not be put upon by the vile Munsey, we are privy to everything, we ourselves are part of the furniture. Brute Force thankfully doesn't disappoint with its ending, the tension has been built up perfectly, the mood is set, so when the ending comes it's explosive and a truly fitting finale to what has been a first rate prison drama. 9/10

Criterion DVD Region 1.

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« Reply #5 on: May 03, 2017, 05:38:47 AM »

“Those gates only open three times. When you come in, when you've served your time, or when you're dead!”

Brute Force was directed by Jules Dassin for independent producer Mark Hellinger’s production company. It was Hellinger’s follow-up to his hit film The Killers which had introduced his discovery Burt Lancaster to the movie-going audience. Unfortunately the hard-living, hard-drinking Hellinger died just six months after the premier of the film of a heart attack at the age of 44.
Brute Force was also the first Noir - and big success - of socially conscious, left-wing director Dassin. His career in the US was to be a short one. Following Brute Force he made two more socially critical movies and found himself quickly in hot water.
Never shy about expressing his politics, barely two years later he ran foul of HUAC and during the Committee hearings it was Edward Dmytryk, a member of the “Hollywood Ten” who became a friendly witness, who gave Dassin’s name to the Committee. His testimony was damning enough to sink Dassin’s career. In 1949 Dassin left the US for fear of being blacklisted. He eventually became a successful director in Europe but never returned to Hollywood.

The cast is uniformly excellent, down to the smallest parts. This film doesn’t just belong to its star Lancaster or to the frighteningly effective Cronyn, it benefits from a great ensemble cast which includes Howard Duff, Charles Bickford, Whit Bissel, Jay C. Flippen and many other well-known supporting actors.

The plot of the movie is pretty straightforward. Joe Collins (Burt Lancaster), after 10 days in solitary because of a frame-up, decides he’s had enough of prison life. The sadistic Captain Munsey (Hume Cronyn playing against type) terrorizes the inmates and is making life a living hell for all of them. Together with his cell mates from R17 Joe plans the escape. Unfortunately they have a traitor in their midst who leaks information to Munsey. Joe finds out but is so desperate to escape that he insists the breakout go through anyway. He simply doesn’t care which way it ends.
Lancaster appears for much of the picture without his shirt on and as always he’s incredibly intense and seething with barely contained rage. He’s a born rebel who has no intention of giving in to Munsey’s authoritarianism. Even solitary confinement can’t break him. Everything about him is tense, like a tight-wound coil about to spring. He’s the everyman fighting against an overpowering system.

From the beginning the futility of the breakout is foreshadowed. Even when Lancaster becomes aware of the fact that Munsey is on to them, he still insists on going through with their plan. It’s suicidal, but his rage is too big. The accumulated tension can only be released in a violent and bloody finale, a massacre.

The violence was pretty nasty and shocking for its time and three scenes still stand out to this day: the inmate revenge on the stoolie who framed Lancaster. With blowtorches he’s backed into a massive machine press; the infamous rubber hose scene and the punishment of the screaming traitor by tying him to a rail car in the end.

Brute Force relies heavily on the use of Noir fetish elements. A ticking clock underscores the importance of time racing on, never standing still until the bitter end when time and luck finally run out. The pouring rain that beats down relentlessly fills the movie with an overwhelming sense of despair, futility and soul-sucking hopelessness which eventually builds to a violent climax that's still shocking today.

The movie feels very claustrophobic for obvious reasons. In the opening shot we’re introduced to Westgate Prison, a huge, grim and foreboding structure with an almost medieval aura that is enhanced by the presence of a drawbridge. It’s a horrendous overcrowded place run by a sadistic lunatic, “one big human bomb ready to explode”.

Hume Cronyn almost steals the show as the sadistic Captain Munsey. Of small stature, he is very soft-spoken and slightly effete, a power-hungry psychopath with an ice-cold cruelty. The prison warden, whose position Munsey covets, is utterly weak and spineless. Munsey’s game is to discredit him so he can take over. “I just want to help the warden…He doesn’t know that kindness is actually weakness”. He runs the prison more like a concentration camp, inhumane and brutal. Munsey’s uniform is clearly reminiscent of SS uniforms, it gives him license to abuse his absolute power. Prisoners’s activities are taken away, parole hearings are suspended and no visitors are allowed. By psychological or physical torture he means to break the prisoners, but not all of them can be broken.
One of the most horrifying scenes has Munsey, wearing a wifebeater and suggestively stroking a rifle, torturing a prisoner with a rubber hose to classical music (Wagner of course!). It plays like a homoerotic S & M sequence.

Brute Force owes a lot to WB message pictures of the 30s, when movies about men doing hard time were incredibly popular. Depression era audiences liked seeing prisoners “sticking it to the Man” and gaining a victory over authority.
The prison movie was never understated in its message pushing of social responsibility and understanding. It certainly isn’t here. But Brute Force goes a step further. The producers hit the audience over the head with their Nazi analogy. In the context of the times this is clearly not surprising and perfectly understandable, but it’s all handled without much subtlety. We can choose who Munsey represents: Hitler, Mussolini, Franco, McCarthy…take your pick. HUAC noticed too.

The PCA didn’t particularly appreciate this depiction of an authority figure as corrupt. The Code had decreed that institutions of law should never be portrayed in a negative light, a restriction Hellinger bent mightily. But it has to be stressed that Munsey is the sole villain of the  piece. Clearly Dassin and Hellinger meant the single guard to stand in for the institutionalized cruelty of the entire prison system but this being 1947, it was clear that Hellinger had to compromise. Criterion Collection’s DVD booklet reprints a bitter but fascinating exchange between Hellinger and Joseph Breen about the PCA’s censorship. Hellinger felt that the “guts” of his picture was gone. Had it not been for the Code, the outcome of this movie could have been even grimmer.

Munsey’s opponent, the spokesman for liberal society, is the nice old prison doctor, full of the milk of human kindness but a hopeless, defeatist and ineffectual drunk. He’s full of good intentions, but without action. His constant pleas for compassion, human rights and understanding are a bit too pat. They come off as piously moralizing. Nowadays I’d file it under bleeding heart liberal talk.

The portrayal of the prisoners is certainly heavily tinged with Dassin’s left-leaning philosophy. The inmates all seem to be basically good guys trapped by circumstances in unbearable situations. None of their crimes suggest unpardonable evil, there are no junkies, sadists, rapists, child murderers or psychos in the prison. It’s good inmates vs bad guards, a setup we’ll find again in The Shawshank Redemption. The pure-at-heart are practically martyrs held hostage by Snidely Whiplash.
Whit Bissel is only a small-time embezzler, Duff took the murder rap for his wife and Lancaster is a nice upstanding guy in love with a girl in a wheelchair. One wonders why these guys are in a maximum security prison anyway. Quite a few critics noted that the inmates’s brotherhood dynamic plays out more like prisoners in a POW camp. They’re right on the money. The inmates aren’t criminals, they’re soldiers captured by an evil enemy whose duty it is to escape.
To even further humanize, not to say sentimentalize, the prisoners, we get to hear their backstories told in flashbacks. Reviewers criticized that the flashbacks take away from the claustrophobia, the continuity and feel shoehorned in so the studio could display some of its beauties. But the flashbacks are kept mercifully short, about three minutes, so it’s OK with me.
Again, we’re left with the dilemma of portraying the protagonists as essentially good men, and yet insisting that their forgivable criminal acts be punished. In essence, none are allowed any leniency from the powers at the PCA. Any kind of lasting victory for the inmates is obviously not possible.

The good vs bad set-up is frankly too simplistic. What’s missing is a hefty dose of moral ambiguity, even if Dassin wanted to drive his point home. It strains credulity to the max, and problematically doesn’t make the picture more moral, just more black and white.

But Brute Force is Noir all the way through. In the end it’s clear that there is no escape, no redemption and no hope for anyone. The ending is truly nihilistic, the gang is dead, Munsey is dead, other prisoners and guards are dead too. The escape was all for nothing. The explosion of pent-up hatred consumes everybody, yet the prison walls never open.
The last couple of minutes get a little preachy again with the doc’s speech: “Nobody escapes. Nobody ever really escapes.” But despite his sermonizing, he also sums up the nature of Noir in a nutshell.

Still extremely gritty and hard-hitting today, but I’d give it only an 8.5/10 due to preachiness.


Simplistic - Preachy? Okay, I'll let you have the first one  Cool

Superb reviewing Jess  Cool Cool

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« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2017, 01:40:26 PM »

Quote
The prisoners generally did commit crimes clearly, but did it for reasons we can sympathize with – which is the very definition IMO of a "gray "character, rather than black and white.

D & D, calling them gray characters may work, to me it just seems that producer and director went out of their way to present extenuating circumstances for the guys.
As I said, where are the really bad guys in this prison? I wouldn't have any problems entrusting my life to the inmates. And my virtue Wink. Yes, they may have committed crimes, but really, they're all still decent guys even when they kill the stoolie in the press. Yes, it's an awful death but who really felt sorry for the guy? He was a traitor, and nobody has pity for that.

Quote
As for the ending, I think it is great that nobody survives. That is the point

Absolutely. It's clear it could only end one way, though I wonder what Dassin had in mind when he fought with Breen. Maybe he wanted Munsey to survive and win the day. Now that would have been completely dystopian.

Quote
And the point is that  however guilty these men may be, they are nowhere near as bad as the Establishment or the government or the Fuhrer or whatever.

Yes, but this portrayal is down to Dassin's political convictions. People who end up in a maximum security prison aren't usually misunderstood little angels who just need a hug to bring them back to the path of righteousness.

I agree too that other guards were vicious as well, but I think they took their cue from Munsey. They weren't complete nut jobs. With a better warden they would likely have done their job right.

We have to agree to disagree. Smiley

« Last Edit: May 03, 2017, 01:45:26 PM by Jessica Rabbit » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: May 03, 2017, 01:50:54 PM »

I says preachy, Spike! Smiley

You're right about the "formula traits that lace most prison films". Are there any movies that don't go down that route?

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« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2017, 05:47:12 PM »


Yes, but this portrayal is down to Dassin's political convictions. People who end up in a maximum security prison aren't usually misunderstood little angels who just need a hug to bring them back to the path of righteousness.

Actually, don't blame Dassin for that; according to Eddie Muller's intro on TCM, Dassin was displeased with the script - specifically the part about how the guys are all "innocent."

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« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2017, 05:53:14 PM »

Quote
Actually, don't blame Dassin for that; according to Eddie Muller's intro on TCM, Dassin was displeased with the script - specifically the part about how the guys are all "innocent."

How very interesting. I would not have expected that. I'd like to look into that.
We don't have TV (cable) anymore, so no TCM for me, as basically anything can be watched on the internet nowadays. Didn't somebody say here that Muller is doing all the intros for Turner's Noir Summer? I wish I could see them.

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« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2017, 07:02:14 PM »

How very interesting. I would not have expected that. I'd like to look into that.
We don't have TV (cable) anymore, so no TCM for me, as basically anything can be watched on the internet nowadays. Didn't somebody say here that Muller is doing all the intros for Turner's Noir Summer? I wish I could see them.

Yes he is doing the intro for the noir every Sunday morning at 10:00.

I recorded - both intro and ending. Here they are:

introduction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk_31DA7euQ&feature=youtu.be

closing: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KN6bHZhuAk&feature=youtu.be

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« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2017, 07:26:11 PM »

Thank you so much! I'll have a closer look at them tomorrow. Afro

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drinkanddestroy
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« Reply #12 on: May 03, 2017, 09:38:30 PM »

Muller is great.

I know he is a noir specialist, but I wish he would take over the full-time hosting duties replacing Robert Osborne. Muller is much better than Ben Menkiewicz or Tiffany Vazquez.

« Last Edit: May 04, 2017, 12:09:14 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: May 04, 2017, 04:45:04 AM »

How very interesting. I would not have expected that. I'd like to look into that.
We don't have TV (cable) anymore, so no TCM for me, as basically anything can be watched on the internet nowadays. Didn't somebody say here that Muller is doing all the intros for Turner's Noir Summer? I wish I could see them.

Sling TV on the internet has TCM with the option of watching what was scheduled any time you want too within a reasonable amount of time before they update the list.

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« Reply #14 on: May 04, 2017, 05:18:55 AM »

Muller is great.

I know he is a noir specialist, but I wish he would take over the full-time hosting duties replacing Robert Osborn. Muller is much better than Ben Menkiewicz or Tiffany Vazquez.
This is the best idea you've ever had. Have you got TCM contact info? Send them your thoughts!

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