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Author Topic: First Viewing of GBU  (Read 5733 times)
Dirty Rat
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« on: December 30, 2011, 09:51:25 AM »

As simple as the subject title says.....
I know there are some "old codgers" ( Cheesy) around here that saw it when it came out in the theatres back in the day so let's get 'em listed.

Mine was a home recording here in the UK in 1986 or '87.

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« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2011, 12:44:58 PM »

I saw it on Times Square in January 1968  Afro Afro Afro

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« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2011, 02:23:41 PM »

We had a film club at high school, saw it first (pan-scan) on 16mm in 1981. Made a huge impact nevertheless, I was young and there was
no homevideo yet.
Took me 30 years to see it on 35mm / Scope: this year, again a film club I made the program for. But this time in a decent cinema.

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« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2011, 03:36:42 PM »

I couldn't watch it in the 60's because minors under 14 weren't admitted to vision (probably only because of the final "hijo de puta") so I watched it in late summer 1975 or 1974 in a cinema in a sea resort near Rome CJ knows well. Liked it but wasn't much impressed because my favourite Leone was and still is FFDM. And nothing stayed in my mind afterwards. Re-saw it in the late '80's on first italian tv programming of L.'s movies and still wasn't that much impressed at least by even the most famous sequences which I started to focalize after I joined this board. This is the only L.'s western I just saw once in a theatre, the other ones having seen at least 5 times each.

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« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2011, 03:37:39 PM »

But is this the right board? Shocked

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Dirty Rat
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« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2011, 09:27:04 PM »

Sorry, wrong board! How can I move it, or does a moderator have to do it?

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« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2011, 08:54:52 AM »

I was about 12, and I had seen fod and fafdm, but didn't realize there was a third one (these were all pan/scan vhs) Here's where it gets weird...I didn't like it at all, thought it was really slow, and was really disappointed. Gave it a chance again in my late teens and was blown away. Now it's my favorite of the 3 (and my favorite Leone film). I've seen the "restored" version in the theatre once when it premiered 5 or 6 years ago...I still prefer the cut without the italian additions, but I'm happy that Italian footage exists, I was so excited to watch it when it first came out as deleted scenes on DVD.

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« Reply #7 on: December 31, 2011, 11:05:49 AM »

1st Time: June 14, 1968.  I was 15. We had heard the Montenegro music on the radio (was #2 for one week, Mrs. Robinson was #1).  We knew who Clint Eastwood was (from Rawhide), and liked westerns.  We were wondering why most of the names in the titles were Italians.  We had seen no trailers or advertisements.  The second feature was "The Party" where interestingly, a bridge was blown up by accident when no cameras were rolling.

2nd Time: June 15, 1968.

Fistful of Dollars/For a Few Dollars More double feature 1969.

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« Reply #8 on: December 31, 2011, 01:04:08 PM »

I was 9 and my Dad taped it very late one night, probably to test out our new vhs player.
I was searching through things that they had receorded with excitement (it was pretty new back then and all a bit of a novelty) and I stumbled across the last scene of the GBU. The final schootout felt like a film in itself to me and I kept on rewinding it back (in vision) to the beginning of that scene as I was too scared to rewind all the way back to the start of the film. Anyway after a few weeks of watching that every night after school I did rewind it back to the begninning and watching it all. Probably in several sittings though. I became obsessed with it. People would come round and I would be watching it - and they knew that I would be - again!

I didn't know about the extra scenes until I saw it on TV one night. Then I got really excited about the '04 release. I had no knowledge of the previous DVD with the cut scenes as extras. I really dislike the new gun shots etc, etc and wish that I could get hold of the uncut DVD with the extra scenes but the couple of times that I since tried to order it the sellers kept on sending me a different versions than what was actually listed. 25 years later, I'm still freaking obsessed.....!

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« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2011, 01:10:33 PM »

We had a film club at high school, saw it first (pan-scan) on 16mm in 1981. Made a huge impact nevertheless, I was young and there was
no homevideo yet.

There was. It was the year I bought my first VRC. and GBU was released that year and in great fullscreen. Fuck, it looked terrible, but it was my first chance to watch it, and it was immediately clear that GBU was by far the best of the trilogy. I had already viewed the other 2 that year on VHS (at least in something around 1,70:1) and had seen in the late 70s My Name Is Nobody (which wasn't funny enough then) and OuTW (which was a bore then) in the theatres. I rewatched Nobody that year on VHS and loved it too.
 

I had also re-watched OUTW again in the theatre, maybe a year earlier, after I had seen the end of the McBain scene on TV in a Fonda portrait, and suddenly thought that it was great, and it was, and still is.

But sadly I never managed to see the Dollar trilogy in a cinema, but OUTW about 10 - 15 times.

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« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2011, 02:02:06 PM »

TNT and TBS used to show it constantly, back when they were decent channels. I first saw it around '98 or '99 but it didn't make much impression. Years later and sat down and watched the whole thing, and loved it.

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« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2011, 03:17:21 PM »

1st Time: June 14, 1968.  I was 15. We had heard the Montenegro music on the radio (was #2 for one week, Mrs. Robinson was #1).  We knew who Clint Eastwood was (from Rawhide), and liked westerns.  We were wondering why most of the names in the titles were Italians.  We had seen no trailers or advertisements.  The second feature was "The Party" where interestingly, a bridge was blown up by accident when no cameras were rolling.

2nd Time: June 15, 1968.

Fistful of Dollars/For a Few Dollars More double feature 1969.

You forgot to mention the place. Angry

Anyway I assume that it was the Montenegro's tune which brought you to the cinema. Did you realize when you watched the movie that it had a different version from Montenegro's? And, at the time, what of the two you thought it was better?

Now, it is strange that I don't remember the title song being much of a hit over here, at least as Fistful was. Probably I am wrong but I don't think that, not counting the last ten years, I heard it on the radio more than a handful of times. And even the title tune didn't register with me exactly as the movie didn't.



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« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2011, 04:15:38 PM »

3 years ago, during the second year of law school, in my dorm, on my laptop, rented from iTunes  Smiley

I'd first heard about the movie cuz I am a huge Metallica fan, and they famously walk out to "The Ecstacy of Gold" at the beginning of every concert. So I figured eventually I'd have to see the movie. Then there was once a reference to the movie on a Seinfeld episode (I wanna say it was "The Strike," but I am not 100% sure), and I am also a huge Seinfeld fan. (Yeah, my loves in life are Metallica, Seinfeld, the Yankees, and now Leone  Smiley)

I used to always rent movies off iTunes (before I realized that renting dvd's from Netflix was a far better way of doing things). So at one point, I must have been in need of a movie to watch, and decided to finally rent GBU.

Up to that point, I had only seen one Western in my life: The Quick and the Dead, which I hated so much, I swore I'd never see a Western again! I did not even know that GBU was a Western before I started watching it; if I had, I'd probably not have even bothered to watch it. Anyway, once I started watching and realized it was a Western, I was upset, but decided to watch it anyway, cuz I'd already rented it.

Even though it was only 3 years ago, let's just say my taste in movies has changed drastically since then. At that time, I'm sitting there watching the first half, and I  just COULD NOT STAND the movie. I felt that it just dragged on and on and on. I seriously considered not even finishing it, but decided to do so (THANK GOD FOR THAT!) Once Blondie and Tuco left the Mission San Antonio, when the movie really picked up, I just started loving it! (I was just puzzled why it took forever for Ecstasy of Gold -- the very thing that interested me in the movie, to come on!)

Needless to say, by the time the movie was over, I was LOVING it, and like all of Leone's movies, it's among my all-time faves: (the whole thing, not just the second half!)  So when it was over and I wanted to find out some more info on it, I looked it up on Wikipedia, and it said it was part of a trilogy directed by the same guy named Leone, and decided to give the other 2 a shot as well. The rest is history. Been immersing myself in Leone ever since  Smiley

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« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2011, 05:40:21 PM »

There was. It was the year I bought my first VRC.

But sadly I never managed to see the Dollar trilogy in a cinema, but OUTW about 10 - 15 times.

Yes, there was, rich boy Smiley
We couldn't afford one that early, 'tapes being expensive too (I remember when my buddy bought three HAMMER films in London, THORN-EMI VHS, for about 80 or 100 pounds each. That first VHS edition from Warner Home was great, I still have some of those 'glass boxes' for sentimental reasons: SEARCHERS, WILD BUNCH, GBU, WOODSTOCK, REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE ... those were among the first films released on Video in 1980 / 1981 ...
DOLLAR: the first time I saw FOD in a theatre in 1980 was really memorable (and weird): In our cinema we had Turkish, Greek and Italian screenings in those days (Mercedes City here, as many factory workers as population). The Italian 'distributor always came with the 35mm print and some photo-bustas I used for decorating the lobby / display windows. I tried to talk him into giving me some bustas (first release), but he had only a few he really needed for travelling around Germany along with the print.  Anyway, that afternoon I saw FOD for the very first time, in Italian language (uncut too of course) along with 221 Italians, me being the only one who didn't understand the dialogue. Well, I didn't need to really Smiley What an experience..

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« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2011, 06:15:16 PM »

well, now that some of you guys are discussing when you saw the first Dollars films, I'll discuss that too. (Perhaps the title should be changed to s/t like "First Viewing of each film," and moved to the General Discussion Thread?)

so after I had seen GBU as I discussed in my previous post, I wanted to read more about the film, and went to Wikipedia, where it said this was the third in a trilogy of "Dollars" films. As I'd mentioned before, I had sworn to never see a Western after I had a terrible experience with my first Western (The Quick and the Dead), and only saw GBU cuz I didn't know it was a Western when I rented it! But I loved it so much, I decided to see the others in the trilogy.


So shortly after watching GBU, I rented FOD off iTunes as well. As soon as the opening theme started, I was really, really excited: I had loved the music from GBU so much, and now I was in for another awesome Morricone soundtrack! Unfortunately, I didn't love the movie nearly as much -- specifically, I had a very bad feeling about everyone dying, particularly the massacre of the Baxters. I mean, I know that Westerns are about shooting and dying, but in this movie, it was a sad, depressing town and everyone was massacred at the end -- not much of a life. So I had a very bad feeling about it all. And I started thinking, "I was correct to have sworn off Westerns after seeing The Quick and The Dead. Sure, I loved GBU, but now I had seen FOD and HATED it, so perhaps my initial feeling on Westerns was correct, and GBU was just a fluke.

But for some reason, I decided to watch FAFDM, just to complete the trilogy. Again, on my laptop, rented off iTunes. I fully expected to hate it as well, and if I had, I'd probably have never seen another Western. But I absolutely LOVED LOVED LOVED it. From that point on, I became a huge Leone fan, and saw all of his films, and then once I started reading Frayling's works and heard him discussing all these old Westerns that Leone was influenced by, I decided to start watching AW's as well, and I haven't stopped doing so since  Smiley

As I mentioned, the first time I watched GBU I hated the first half but loved the second half, (and therefore could say I loved the movie overall. But FAFDM I absolutely LOVED LOVED LOVED from beginning to end, the first time I saw it. For that reason -- though I prefer to think of all of Leone's movies as 6 beautiful movements of one great symphony, and never rank them individually -- FAFDM holds a certain special place in my heart  Smiley

The other 4 (FOD, and the Once Upon a Time "trilogy") I did not like the first time I saw 'em (OUATIA and DYS I didn't like much; FOD and OUATITW I absolutely HATED!)  I didn't like those 4 until the second time I saw 'em.

Needless to say, today I am totally obsessed with all of Leone's movies, and all of Frayling's works on them, which have helped me to appreciate the movies even more. I have seen all of Leone's movies numerous times, and experienced all of Frayling's orks on Leone -- ie. listened to all of his commentaries, read his books, listened to his podcasts, watched interviews etc. -- hundreds of times.

Until the moment I began watching Leone's movies, I wasn't a huge movie guy, and even when I did watch movies, I basically had a kid's standpoint: you know, mindless stupid shit from a very unsophisticated point of view, with zero interest in or understanding of direction, camera angles, or anything else that kids don't think about. Only when I started watching Leone's films and particularly when I began reading/listening to Frayling's discussions of them, did I get introduced to and become interested in the nuances of moviemaking, and transform from, so to speak, an average fan to a cineaste'. I am 27 years old, and I'd say that in the 3 years since I have started following Leone, I may have seen more movies than I did in my lifetime prior to that.

I was fortunate enough to tour the OUATIA locations with dj and cj a few months ago, and to see the movie on the big scree at Lincoln Center. It was the only time I have ever seen a Leone movie on the big screen. (Unfortunately, the movie itself was not a great experience, cuz at least one reel was pretty badly damaged, and the sound was sooooo low, I could barely hear anything. I kept running out to get popcorn!)

My to-do list has the following 4 things, when possible, and in no particular order:

a) see all of Leone's movies on the big screen
b) go to a speech/discussion with Christopher Frayling
c) go to a Morricone concert
d) tour all of Leone's film locations in Spain

There you have it; my last 3 years in a nutshell  Smiley

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