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: The original overdubbing  ( 4866 )
Dirty Rat
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« : July 01, 2009, 11:59:02 PM »

Watching bits of GBU last night reminded me of a question that I have always wanted to ask you guys. Again I suppose my question applies to all films but I am going to use an example from GBU.
What were the techniques for overdubbing back in those days? I can only guess that the likes of Clint, Eli and Lee had to go into a studio, stand in a sound booth and give the lines as they came up whilst watching the film on a projector screen.
Assuming that this was the case what about all the other sounds that were picked up on set? Take the scene when Angel Eyes pours Tuco a little more rum and then pats him on the back in the prison hut whilst talking about playing a little music for his digestion. I can only imagine that back in those days they didn't have closed mikes that could pick up only what the actor nearest to them said. If this had been the case then I suppose that the actors voice track would be on 1 track on the mixing desk and they could easily overdub them. So when the actors went back into the studio to overdub their voices surely all other sounds would need to be added to - the pouring of the rum, the pat on the back, the striking of the match, the footsteps etc.
This would be absurd though surely so again could one of you guys fill me in with what the process was, I'm baffled

« : July 02, 2009, 12:09:15 AM Dirty Rat »
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« #1 : July 02, 2009, 02:09:53 AM »

No direct sound was recorded on the set. So yes, all sounds had to be dubbed. 


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« #2 : July 02, 2009, 05:49:36 AM »

what he said  O0


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« #3 : July 02, 2009, 06:03:30 AM »

Unbelievable.... I think I have read that here before though come to think about it.
I find it quite fascinating to imagine them sculpting the sound in post production.
Do you think this may add to the Leone uniqueness?

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« #4 : July 02, 2009, 08:33:54 AM »

Standard Italian industry practice.



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« #5 : July 03, 2009, 11:01:11 AM »

I also read here somewhere the the original dubbing contains unique gun sounds for each gun whereas in the new restored version they all sound the same.


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« #6 : July 04, 2009, 12:10:41 AM »

I also read here somewhere the the original dubbing contains unique gun sounds for each gun whereas in the new restored version they all sound the same.

That's definitely true bubba.
In my mind I still think of the scenes from this film with the original gunshots. It's only the latest restored version that has these new 21st century crappy shots. It's totally ruined it for me. Anyway that's for a different thread I suppose.

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« #7 : July 04, 2009, 04:39:43 AM »

In my mind I still think of the scenes from this film with the original gunshots. It's only the latest restored version that has these new 21st century crappy shots. It's totally ruined it for me.
Play. The. Italian. Dub.



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« #8 : July 04, 2009, 09:28:36 AM »

Will do

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« #9 : January 30, 2012, 08:47:05 PM »

Watching bits of GBU last night reminded me of a question that I have always wanted to ask you guys. Again I suppose my question applies to all films but I am going to use an example from GBU.
What were the techniques for overdubbing back in those days? I can only guess that the likes of Clint, Eli and Lee had to go into a studio, stand in a sound booth and give the lines as they came up whilst watching the film on a projector screen.
Assuming that this was the case what about all the other sounds that were picked up on set? Take the scene when Angel Eyes pours Tuco a little more rum and then pats him on the back in the prison hut whilst talking about playing a little music for his digestion. I can only imagine that back in those days they didn't have closed mikes that could pick up only what the actor nearest to them said. If this had been the case then I suppose that the actors voice track would be on 1 track on the mixing desk and they could easily overdub them. So when the actors went back into the studio to overdub their voices surely all other sounds would need to be added to - the pouring of the rum, the pat on the back, the striking of the match, the footsteps etc.
This would be absurd though surely so again could one of you guys fill me in with what the process was, I'm baffled

All footage in this film, and all other Italian films, was silent, and all sound was dubbed is post-synchronization. Does anyone know why this was standard Italian practice, and when it ended?

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« #10 : January 31, 2012, 04:41:01 AM »

I venture to guess that it was cheaper to do that way.


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« #11 : January 31, 2012, 05:47:34 AM »

Frayling talks a lot about this. he says it was standard practice in Italian fimmaking, partly arising from Cinecitta being built in the flight path of a nearby airport, so planes were going over and making noise all the time, so they couldn't use direct sound. Also, he says that Leone and crew liked talking on the set; recording sound direct requires absolute silence from the crew during shooting. And Leone believed that sound is 40% of a movie, and liked to add on lots of layers of sound, which can only be done in post-production (although I wonder oif that would necessarily preclude using the direct dialogue?)

RE: the gunshots: I don't know anything at all about guns (that's what unfortunately happens when you live your whole life as a law-abiding resident of New York City) and I never saw any version of Leone's movies other than the new dvd's, so gunshots don't mean anything to me.

But ignorance is bliss!

On that note, I was recently thinking about how all those movies I watched on VHS for all those years were pan and scanned, but I never knew anything about that stuff so had no idea what I was missing. It wasn't until a few years ago that I discovered the whole concept of aspect ratios and pan and scan, etc. and by that time, of course, I had a dvd player and thankfully the dvd's are generally in original aspect ratios so it's all good. (Now, I virtually never watch a pan and scanned movie, unless it's the very rare case of a movie I REALLY wanna see and which doesn't exist in any other format). I woulda gone nuts back in the 90's if I woulda realized that all the movies I was seeing were missing up to 45% of the width of the frame (for 2.35:1 movies).

So yeah, ignorance is often a very good thing  :)


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« #12 : February 08, 2012, 07:08:20 PM »

I venture to guess that it was cheaper to do that way.

I am sure that is another reason, as you do not need to pay for boom mike, hidden mikes, have more excessive wiring hanging everywhere, ect.

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