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Author Topic: Fistful Vocals.  (Read 33558 times)
iceman
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« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2005, 03:49:05 PM »

Iceman - I posted this Friday under "Fistful Vocals"

No, the vocals are not "we can fight", they are "with the wind", absolutely.  I just got hold of the film music with two tracks with the vocals included; the chants begin just after the words "with the wind" are sung, and they are clearly "with the wind" as well.  The lyrics by Woody Guthrie posted above by "Visitor" are about 99% correct, the vocalist makes a few minor changes.  Also, the lyrics to "Per un pugno di dollari" posted by "Visitor" in the subsequent post are also correct.  So, it's "with the wind", see the Woody Guthrie lyrics above. 

Just listened to the film again and it sure sounds like "we can fight"...unless "with the wind" sounds like we can fight  in italian.

Where can we get hold of the"fistful" version with lyrics?

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« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2005, 04:08:27 PM »

Just heard two versions by Alison Krauss (who?) and Odetta(who?)....
Odetta, one of the greatest BLUES singers ever to grace our planet and Alison Krauss.....HEAVEN! Check out these two gals!  Cool

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« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2005, 05:00:20 PM »

Iceman: E-mail me at cussboy@cox.net.  The file is just over three MB, so I made a more compressed one under 2 MB that I believe most E-mails can handle, it sounds fine.  It's an mp3 file.

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iceman
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« Reply #18 on: January 19, 2005, 11:24:45 AM »

Iceman: E-mail me at cussboy@cox.net.  The file is just over three MB, so I made a more compressed one under 2 MB that I believe most E-mails can handle, it sounds fine.  It's an mp3 file.

Thanks for the files Cusser.. magic. You are definatly right the chants on that version are certainly "with the wind"(with an Italian twang), but I have to say after listening to the soundtrack again ...the two still dont sound the same ...it still seems to me that they chant "we can fight" in the film. Maybe Ennio changed it in keeping with the theme of the film, that  of the persecuted eventually fighting back and winning through..might just be rambling now........ any other thoughts?

Ice

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« Reply #19 on: January 19, 2005, 11:37:32 AM »

Ice - I agree that in the film music and soundtrack albums that the chants do sound more like "we can fight" than the "with the wind" in the fully vocalized version.  Maybe in the fully vocalized version the background singers were english-speaking and maybe Italians phonetically vocalized them for "Fistful". 

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« Reply #20 on: January 19, 2005, 11:56:16 AM »

Here's what I've pulled together from several knowlegeable posters here:

Original Italian 45 single: RCA PM45-3115 / Peter Tevis (arranged and conducted by Ennio Morricone) / side A: Pastures of Plenty - 2:38  side B: Notte Infinita - 2:58   

This RCA single is one of the most important in the history of Italian film music in general, and specifically to the history of the spaghetti western. Prior to Sergio Leone beginning work on A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS, Peter Tevis left his home in California and settled in Rome, intending to pursue a career as a singer. Tevis' Italian agent arranged for him to record singles with Ennio Morricone, who, at the time, was contracted with RCA Italy to arrange and record ballads with various artists. Tevis had earlier invented a musical identity for himself incorporating a unique, masculine Spanish/Latin color which he deftly applied to traditional Americana/folk/bluegrass. During his initial visit to Morricone's office at RCA, Tevis performed live his special version of Woody Guthrie's Pastures of Plenty. Incorporated into Tevis' take on Pastures was a short melodic "bridge", or instrumental middle section, which Tevis had composed. Morricone fully absorbed Tevis' invention and ultimately produced the amazing sounds found on side A of this single

http://www.furious.com/perfect/morricone2.html
On the above web page it's simply stated that the chanting in the FOD theme is "We can fight". I don't know whether the source is reliable though... ..here's the text of that page:

Ennio Morricone's Finest Scores
Are the people who choose the Oscar for best musical score deaf or something? Ennio Morricone has been composing for most of his life; his latest non-Oscar for Malena is the latest kick in the teeth. Along with John Williams (Star Wars), Jerry Goldsmith (Chinatown), Bernard Hermann (Taxi Driver) and those crazy cats that did the score for Apocalypse Now, Morricone stands amongst the best.

Several of his scores are unsurpassed for sheer beauty, like the scores for Once Upon a Time in the West, Once Upon a Time in America and The Mission; all tug on the heartstrings like Tuco's neck at the end of The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.

However, it is Morricone's earlier work on Sergio Leone's Spaghetti Western trilogy which includes A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More and The Good, The Bad and The Ugly which stands out most. In comparison to other composers Morricone is the Aphex Twin to John Williams (early) Beach Boys, mixing strange noises that are part of the very fabric of the score, deconstructing the very strict rules of classical/film score music. He was commissioned in 1964 to compose a score for a remake of Japanese visionary Akira Kurosawa's Yojimbo called A Fistful of Dollars. The film itself was remarkable for it's violence and was perhaps the most realistic depiction of the Wild West.

Morricone was a big fan of traditional Mexican folk music and particularly the use of the human voice as an instrument. Taking Woody Guthrie's "Pastures of Plenty" and adding this element, Morricone came up with something simple and quite remarkable. Using a human whistle and a guitar, both performed by fellow Italian Alessandro Alessadroni, the music sounds like a paradox, sad and lonely compared to the violence of the film. The use of the whistle was meant to suggest the solitude of the outlaw (played by Clint Eastwood) character in the film, much like Handel's use of instruments in Peter and the Wolf to represent different characters. The track typically also uses the shouted voices ("We can fight"), the bell and the definitive change of pace towards the end of the piece.

In the next film For a Few Dollars More (1965), Morricone extended his musical palette, the score was similar with Alessadroni just doing the whistling without the guitar, but with more human voices and an instrument that sounds as though it belongs in native Australian folk music. Also this time Morricone used more traditionally classical instruments such as violins. The influence of the violin played fast is evoked in '70's classic funk such as Isaac Hayes Oscar winning Theme from Shaft.

Morricone perhaps didn't change the basics because the score was a great part of the identity of Eastwood's central character and the 'Spaghetti Westerns.' An electric guitar (from a classical composer!) plays the simple central motif which like the similar "Apache" by The Shadows has been used in free-style hip-hop and on Babe Ruth's brilliant "The Mexican." Typically novelty barroom orchestras have also turned the score into 'cheesy shit.'

The success of the first films had bought Morricone and Leone time. All along Leone had wanted music that fitted to every action, every bit of silence was there for a reason.

The extra time and resources given to Morricone ended up with one of the best opening film scores ever. Like Vertigo's central piece and sleaze jazz, it is an essential part of the film. It also has been well parodied by Eastwood's later film Kelly's Heroes. Although undeniably pompous and operatic the main theme for The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (1966) is stunning in it's originality and it's emotional depth. It's central 'Wah-wah-wah,' performed with whistle and human voices, will always bring to mind any Western. It's both dense but accessible at the same time. Morricone effectively mixes concert music and simulated animal sounds (which Morricone used to represent the savage nature of the Wild West); you cannot take it in the first time you hear it.

Like all the other themes it starts relatively calm, then the military drums come in (definitely representing the theme of war in the film), the drumming does get more frantic, typically electric guitar then main/vital choral voices join. All the instruments converge at the end in some kind of wild and over the top crescendo. The best way to describe it would be Beethoven on acid, trapped in a forest full of wolves. The main refrain is relentlessly repeated throughout the film like a motif, especially on plot changing moments and those of a comic nature.

Taken in the context of the period, the mid '60's, it fits in well with the experimentation of the acid scene that was sweeping culture in general. The Beatles were making astonishing music what with "Tomorrow Never Knows" and "A Day in the Life." It also appears that classical composers were getting on the experimentation boat as well as the popular artists.

After the success of all three films both Morricone and Leone moved on to more serious work. Their next film together, Once Upon A Time in West, yielded both a more serious, heartfelt story and less operatic but no less beautiful music. Westerns generally disappeared from view after the Spaghetti Westerns, Michael Cimino's epic Heaven's Gate in 1978 being a swansong for the genre.

Morricone and Leone effectively destroyed the genre that '50's Western master-actor John Wayne and director John Ford had tried to portray America's birth as a nation as a golden age. If anything Morricone had composed the soundtrack to which these 'lies' were stomped underfoot, and that's no bad thing.

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« Reply #21 on: January 19, 2005, 12:12:16 PM »

Could anyone put this score online?

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KERMIT
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« Reply #22 on: January 20, 2005, 05:16:12 AM »

Could anyone put this score online?
it would solve all my troubles if some body could
 

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« Reply #23 on: January 20, 2005, 12:09:13 PM »

Peter Tevis' rendition of Per un Pugno di Dollari is included on the German Canto Morricone Vol. 2 compilation on Bear Family Records.

Scroll down the page for a measly 30 second clip of the song in gloriously rotten wma:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000282PP/

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« Reply #24 on: January 20, 2005, 01:23:07 PM »

Ice - I agree that in the film music and soundtrack albums that the chants do sound more like "we can fight" than the "with the wind" in the fully vocalized version.  Maybe in the fully vocalized version the background singers were english-speaking and maybe Italians phonetically vocalized them for "Fistful". 

Cusser - you maybe interested in this site where the 3rd or  4th paragraph suggests its actually "in the wind". It also gives some interesting facts on morricones music...there are a few pages to read.

Ice
http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/features/morricone2.asp

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« Reply #25 on: January 20, 2005, 01:34:35 PM »

watch the film again. pay close attention to the riding sequence where the Baxter and Rojo gangs are racing to the cemetery to get thewounded(dead)soldiers.
"with the wind" still appears in the music here.

I've read that EM didn't care what the chants were when he recorded the score, that it was unimportant, and it was left up to Alessandro Alessandroni to direct the vocalists.

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iceman
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« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2005, 03:57:05 AM »

Peter Tevis' rendition of Per un Pugno di Dollari is included on the German Canto Morricone Vol. 2 compilation on Bear Family Records.

Scroll down the page for a measly 30 second clip of the song in gloriously rotten wma:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000282PP/


Anyone interested in slightly different versions of the soundtracks should listen to "Ennio Morricone..The Soundtracks" on the Dejavu Retro Gold Collection. No. R2CD 42-43.
2CD's with booklet.  Cost me about 8 GBP's in Majorca. Great to hear different versions than the film scores although they are very close....

Ice

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« Reply #27 on: February 10, 2005, 05:08:17 AM »

http://s23.yousendit.com/d.aspx?id=2XM71H42I2A3W06RHMZTG6VYMI

http://s10.yousendit.com/d.aspx?id=2UETG1ZEIMWWN0ZFNXWI1J8TWO

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« Reply #28 on: February 10, 2005, 04:47:52 PM »

I know this has come up before but has anybody come across the single version which has on the B side a song which begins;
"FOR A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS HE WILL KILL ANY MAN"..... Sung to the FOD main theme.
Lost the single years ago but would love to get the full lyrics to this one! Anybody got it?

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« Reply #29 on: February 11, 2005, 09:11:52 AM »

I know this has come up before but has anybody come across the single version which has on the B side a song which begins;
"FOR A FISTFUL OF DOLLARS HE WILL KILL ANY MAN"..... Sung to the FOD main theme.
Lost the single years ago but would love to get the full lyrics to this one! Anybody got it?

SEE CUSSER ABOVE

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