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: Waterloo  ( 9274 )
Juan Miranda
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« #15 : April 30, 2006, 08:34:13 AM »

THE PAWNBROKER is indeed Rod's finest performance in any movie, I think, and lays to rest any notion that he was just an old ham. Very harrowing stuff about a Holocaust surviver, reduced by his experience at the hands of the Nazi's to a terminally embittered shell of a man. He has nothing but contempt for all those around him, especially his customers.

It's ending is both devastating and curious, as it's laden with Christian imigary. This at the end of a film by a Jewish filmaker about a Jewish survivor. I guess this is also in the novel by Edward Lewis Wallant, who died of an anurism aged only 36, but he was Jewish too.

Lumet always seems capable of coaxing and teasing unforgettable performances from his actors. See what he does with Sean Connery in THE HILL and THE OFFENCE.


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« #16 : April 30, 2006, 08:49:27 AM »

THE PAWNBROKER is indeed Rod's finest performance

I posted this about Steiger on another thread here...so I'll quote myself......edited slightly for those who haven't seen the film.

"the scene in "The Pawnbroker" comes to mind.....as he looks up and lets out a wordless scream...... one of the most compelling...absolutely brilliant scenes in modern cinema........conveying unfathomable anguish & tortured emotion......intensely tragic......& all silently.

The word is that there was dialogue../ actual sounds,  written for this scene...but Steiger, as the scene was being shot, totally improvised what's become an indelible film moment."


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« #17 : April 30, 2006, 01:00:33 PM »

only just noticed last night from the Saturday page that Bandoleros(1968) with James Stewart was on-i haven't seen this so i don't know if its any good-this wasn't on the film reviews page >:(

I caught Bandolero last night. It doesn't get shown that much...seen it once before. It is not that great really. Doesn't know whether to be a John Ford or Sergio Leone movie. Stewart is miscast as a baddy. I know it worked with Fonda but not this time. Jerry Goldsmith used a Jews Harp in the theme as well.

 Also THE WILD BUNCH is on BBC2 tonight!!

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« #18 : April 30, 2006, 01:58:26 PM »

I watched the Columbia Tristar DVD.......on the back of the case it claims the time as 128 min....hence my thought that another 4 minutes was cut for the DVD.

Amazon have a Russian DVD but it is the same running time as the UK one. Don't think we'll ever see the full version. :'(

have you seen Charge of the Light Brigade 1968, not the Errol Flynn one which switched it to india ??? It has just come out on DVD on the BFI label with nice extras, documentaries inc one on Richard Williams who did the great animation sequences. Another box office failure this too has stunning camerawork and historical detail.

« : April 30, 2006, 02:16:27 PM Le Bon »
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« #19 : April 30, 2006, 06:54:03 PM »

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if anyone sees rod steiger in 'the pawn broker' i would love to see that.


I have it on a VHS tape


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« #20 : May 01, 2006, 04:55:56 AM »

Doesn't know whether to be a John Ford or Sergio Leone movie. Stewart is miscast as a baddy.
 
Thanks LeBon maybe i'll catch it next time!

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« #21 : May 01, 2006, 02:49:49 PM »

Yes this is one of them movies that they would not be able to make in this day and age a masterpeice, theres no studios left to front the cash up for this type of epic or the quality of actors, and lets not forget no visionary directors.
Suggest you also grab hold of Charge of the Light brigade with Trevor Horward its another classic


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« #22 : May 01, 2006, 04:39:11 PM »

I thought no end of subsequent films were far more satisfying than WATERLOO. As sheer spectacles, THE TWO TOWERS and THE THIN RED LINE were amazing movies. As a film, Malick's goes places very few Hollywood productions have ever gone, never mind Soviet/Italian co-productions (Tarkovsky, I'm looking at you).

However, it's hard to imagin any producer throwing serious money at another Napoleonic land battle film at the moment. Not because of a lack of "visionary" directors (Bondarchuk was never that), but because Hollywood is going through it's most conservative period in decades.


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« #23 : March 29, 2012, 09:12:12 AM »

Afraid I can't second many of the opinions here.

Quote
Waterloo (1970) was one of the '70s biggest flops, a $35 million multi-national boondoggle. Fresh off his gargantuan War and Peace (1967), Soviet director Sergei Bondarchuk teamed with Italian producer Dino DiLaurentis to depict Napoleon Bonaparte's last battle. The resulting film intersperses amazing battle scenes with dull plot. The biggest millstone, however, is Rod Steiger's awful performance.

Napoleon Bonaparte (Rod Steiger) returns from exile on Elba with a small army. Napoleon's old ally Marshal Ney (Dan O'Herlihy) joins him and they oust King Louis XVIII (Orson Welles), reestablishing Bonaparte as Emperor of France. Napoleon defeats Prussian Marshal Blucher (Sergo Zakariadze) at Quatre Bras, forcing the Duke of Wellington (Christopher Plummer) to give battle at Waterloo. The early rounds of the battle go Napoleon's way, and Wellington knows he must rely on Blucher to turn the tide.

Everyone comes to Waterloo for the battle scenes and Bondarchuk delivers some doozies. Using over 15,000 extras, the film's sheer scope is astonishing. One incredible shot has hundreds of French cavalrymen charging amongst a row of British infantry squares. Other scenes are equally impressive: the volleys that devastate the Imperial Guard's final charge, the point-black artillery barrage annihilating some holdouts. It lacks the visceral impact of other war films but the incredible spectacle compensates.

Away from the battlefield, Waterloo is a ponderous bore. The story is choppy, with ragged editing and narrative leaps that suggest heavy cutting. H.A.L. Craig's dull script combines bald exposition with famous quotes, the worst kind of historical writing. Bondarchuk's style choices (sudden zooms, Leone-style close-ups, egregious slow motion) irritate more often than not.

Rod Steiger is absolutely monstrous. He bellows, raves, gestures, bugs out his eyes, broods, pouts, sweats, kisses flags, arches eyebrows, purses lips, intones on the soundtrack, a riot of cacophonous ham. Even at his best Steiger isn't subtle but this is rabies, not acting. Christopher Plummer's low-key Wellington comes off wonderfully in comparison.

The supporting cast is scenery. A bored-looking Orson Welles and Virginia McKenna (Carve Her Name With Pride) have miniscule cameos. Dan O'Herlihy (100 Rifles) gets some meaty scenes early on as the conflicted Marshal Ney. Spaghetti Western star Gianni Garko plays one of Napoleon's marshals. Jack Hawkins, Terence Alexander (The Day of the Jackal), Rupert Davies (John Paul Jones) and Michael Wilding (The Scarlet Coat) feature as Wellington's lieutenants.

Waterloo is worth checking out for the incredible battle scenes. Mostly though, this is the kind of epic I don't really like, all spectacle and little substance. And please muzzle Rod Steiger before he bites someone.  6/10

http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2012/03/waterloo_29.html



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