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: Vertigo (1958)  ( 62381 )
Groggy
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« #30 : September 22, 2012, 02:16:07 PM »

Nice find(s) Jenkins.



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« #31 : September 22, 2012, 03:02:06 PM »

Thanks DJ!


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« #32 : September 22, 2012, 10:33:30 PM »

May be he felt something close to what Leone felt for DYS.
Anyway, my source is the (must-have must-read lust-everything) Hitchcock/Truffaut, which is, by the way (and by far) the greatest cinema book ever.

I want to read that book one day, but I think I'll wait until I see more of Hitch's films, so that I'll understand and appreciate it more. (And it's not necessary to see Truffaut's films before reading it, cuz the book only discusses Hitch's films, right?)

Here are the Hitch films I've seen; are there any greats that I am missing?


Rebecca (1940)
Rope (1948)
Strangers on a Train (1951)
Dial M for Murder (1954)
Rear Window (1954)
The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
The Wrong Man (1956)
Vertigo (1958)
North by Northwest (1958)
Psycho (1960)





« : September 22, 2012, 10:35:51 PM drinkanddestroy »

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« #33 : September 23, 2012, 02:31:56 AM »

Yes, the book is only about Hitchcock's films in chronological order. The bulk of the interview was already done in 1962, with additions up to 1966 (it was first published in 1967).  The rest of Hitch's career and life is also covered in the newer editions.
But you can buy and read it every time. It is an exciting read also for the films you haven't seen, and as it is chronological anyway you can also read only the parts of the films you already know.

My personal favourite is Notorious (1946).
Which belongs for many to his best, and is also Truffaut's favourite.

Some other basic greats of his from the 70s back to the silents:

Frenzy
The Birds
Shadow of a Doubt
Saboteur
Suspicion
Foreign Correspondent
The Lady Vanishes
Young and Innocent
The 39 Steps
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Blackmail
The Lodger


« : September 23, 2012, 02:35:01 AM stanton »

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« #34 : September 23, 2012, 02:44:06 AM »


Some other basic greats of his from the 70s back to the silents:

Frenzy
The Birds
Shadow of a Doubt
Saboteur
Suspicion
Foreign Correspondent
The Lady Vanishes
Young and Innocent
The 39 Steps
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Blackmail
The Lodger



I assume you referring to the 1934 version of "The Man Who Knew Too Much"? I didn't think the 1956 version was all that great, and that's supposed to be the better one, no? (I rated the 1956 version a 7.5/10. It's beautiful visually [despite some processed shots], and Jimmy Stewart and Doris Day feature perhaps the greatest pair of performances ever by male-female leads in the same movie. But I just didn't find the story all that interesting. [And Que Sera Sera was annoying].


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« #35 : September 23, 2012, 02:53:50 AM »

I assume you referring to the 1934 version of "The Man Who Knew Too Much"? I didn't think the 1956 version was all that great, and that's supposed to be the better one, no? (I rated the 1956 version a 7.5/10. It's beautiful visually [despite some processed shots], and Jimmy Stewart and Doris Day feature perhaps the greatest pair of performances ever by male-female leads in the same movie. But I just didn't find the story all that interesting. [And Que Sera Sera was annoying].
All the 1956 version does better is the music hall scene. Otherwise the original is better - the story's more interesting (or told better).


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« #36 : September 23, 2012, 02:57:21 AM »

Yes, the 1934 version, which I prefer. The 56 version has some mainstream Hollywood stuff in it, but contains also lots of great scenes. 8/10

The 34 version has the similar story but also differs in many parts considerably. And it is pretty short with 75 min. 9/10

The 56 version is pop, the 34 version is rock.


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« #37 : September 23, 2012, 03:02:57 AM »

Here's a snippet from the Hitchcock/Truffaut book http://books.google.com/books?id=NnE_sPb3XBQC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA94#v=onepage&q&f=false in which they discuss some of the differences between the two versions, and Hitch says "Let's say the first is the work of a talented amateur, and the second was made by a professional." (p. 94, the small paragraph in the right column).

« : September 23, 2012, 03:05:39 AM drinkanddestroy »

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« #38 : September 23, 2012, 04:16:32 PM »

watched it today again wasn't that impressed did't care for the cartoon dream sequence I like other Hitchcock's better


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« #39 : September 23, 2012, 05:19:35 PM »

watched it today again wasn't that impressed did't care for the cartoon dream sequence I like other Hitchcock's better

you talking about Vertigo?
Roger Ebert says that when someone tells him he doesn't understand what's so great about Vertigo, his answer is "you're insufficiently evolved a a moviegoer  ;D http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2012/08/a_few_calm_words_about_the_lis.html
btw, at the very end of that article, he writes about how when Novak jumps into the river, she isn't really unconscious; I was wondering what y'all thought about that....


as for me, my recent viewing at the Film Forum was my first complete viewing of the movie; my initial reaction was that it's a very good movie, but not top ten all-time, and not even Hitch's best (I prefer Psycho). But after all this talk, I decided to see it again right away, so I rented the dvd from Netflix and just started watching it again. I'll talk more about the movie (and the dvd's bonus features) when I am done watching it.

However, for some reason, the movie plays windowboxed (using my Samsung blu ray player). The movie's Aspect Ratio of 1.85:1 is printed on the front of the disc; normally, that would mean that movie would just use the entire hdtv screen (perhaps with tiny black bars on top and bottom, to make up the difference between the 1.85:1 AR of the movie, and the 1.78:1 AR of the hdtv screen). But for some reason, the movie instead plays windowboxed
(I guess it only uses the middle 4:3 area of the screen, but then letterboxes that to 1.85:1; hence the windowboxing?) But it's really strange why that's happening, this is the first disc on which that's ever happened. Anyone have the same issue with the dvd?


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« #40 : September 23, 2012, 06:14:50 PM »

Ebert can jump up my butt.



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« #41 : September 24, 2012, 02:27:48 AM »

you talking about Vertigo?
Roger Ebert says that when someone tells him he doesn't understand what's so great about Vertigo, his answer is "you're insufficiently evolved a a moviegoer  ;D http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2012/08/a_few_calm_words_about_the_lis.html
btw, at the very end of that article, he writes about how when Novak jumps into the river, she isn't really unconscious; I was wondering what y'all thought about that....


as for me, my recent viewing at the Film Forum was my first complete viewing of the movie; my initial reaction was that it's a very good movie, but not top ten all-time, and not even Hitch's best (I prefer Psycho). But after all this talk, I decided to see it again right away, so I rented the dvd from Netflix and just started watching it again. I'll talk more about the movie (and the dvd's bonus features) when I am done watching it.

However, for some reason, the movie plays windowboxed (using my Samsung blu ray player). The movie's Aspect Ratio of 1.85:1 is printed on the front of the disc; normally, that would mean that movie would just use the entire hdtv screen (perhaps with tiny black bars on top and bottom, to make up the difference between the 1.85:1 AR of the movie, and the 1.78:1 AR of the hdtv screen). But for some reason, the movie instead plays windowboxed
(I guess it only uses the middle 4:3 area of the screen, but then letterboxes that to 1.85:1; hence the windowboxing?) But it's really strange why that's happening, this is the first disc on which that's ever happened. Anyone have the same issue with the dvd?
do you have an overscan setting on the Tv?


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« #42 : September 24, 2012, 02:36:18 AM »

Maybe it is simply an old letterboxed disc.

Not all DVDs are anamorphic. The most, but not all.


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« #43 : September 24, 2012, 04:41:36 AM »

The restored version of Vertigo on R1 DVD was first issued in a letterboxed transfer. Later they put out an anamorphic version, I believe. (I remember at the time I couldn't wait and got an anamorphic version from Hong Kong). At this point, it's best to wait for the Blu-ray which, although it was supposed to be out this week, has now been delayed.

« : September 24, 2012, 05:04:47 AM dave jenkins »


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« #44 : September 24, 2012, 05:01:40 AM »

All the 1956 version does better is the music hall scene. Otherwise the original is better - the story's more interesting (or told better).
Both have their charms. The original has the visit to the evil dentist, the Sydney Street Siege, and the mom blowing away the bad-guy on the roof. The 56 has color, Vistavision, and (as noted) the very, very well done Albert Hall sequence, but it also has one of H's greatest intros to a film: the first 30 minutes is so incredibly well handled that I end up returning to it over and over again. The way the couple gets sucked into the plot, the moment that Jimmy Stewart realizes his kid has been taken, and the scene where he dopes Doris Day before giving her the news are proof of H running on all cylinders. Unhappily, soon after the film begins to meander, and it never really makes a course correction until the Albert Hall. But it's strong from there on out, and I really like the gag at the end.



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