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: For Love of Art  ( 18807 )
drinkanddestroy
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« #120 : November 14, 2017, 03:20:54 PM »

http://www.gettyimages.com/articles/travel/giverny-the-place-that-inspired-monet-s-art

http://www.gettyimages.com/articles/travel/van-gogh-s-paintings-vs-real-locations


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« #121 : November 15, 2017, 07:41:44 AM »

Thanks for posting , D & D. I was in Giverny two years ago.


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« #122 : November 15, 2017, 11:24:03 AM »

Have at least $100 million? You can purchase the only da Vinci currently in private hands, one of fewer than 20 known da Vincis in existence

https://apnews.com/9bf6e599d6f448eb8905a722544b7a11/Rare-painting-by-Leonardo-da-Vinci-auctioned-in-New-York

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/8-things-know-100-million-da-vinci-discovery-salvator-mundi-1111775


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« #123 : November 15, 2017, 02:40:33 PM »

https://apnews.com/df7b79ffbe7043e98e7e22c861864c06/Newly-discovered-painting-shows-Washington's-wartime-tent

the actual tent is on exhibit at the Museum of the American Revolution https://www.amrevmuseum.org/collection/washington-headquarters-tent


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« #124 : November 16, 2017, 02:04:39 AM »

A Van Gogh just sold for over $80 million with fees

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/13/arts/christies-fall-auction-impressionist-modern-van-gogh.html?action=click&contentCollection=Art%20%26%20Design&module=RelatedCoverage&region=Marginalia&pgtype=article


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« #125 : November 16, 2017, 02:04:54 AM »

Have at least $100 million? You can purchase the only da Vinci currently in private hands, one of fewer than 20 known da Vincis in existence

https://apnews.com/9bf6e599d6f448eb8905a722544b7a11/Rare-painting-by-Leonardo-da-Vinci-auctioned-in-New-York

https://news.artnet.com/art-world/8-things-know-100-million-da-vinci-discovery-salvator-mundi-1111775

Well, ladies and gentlemen, it is a historic day in the annals of art: a new record was set for the sale of any painting, whether at auction or private: the da Vinci painting "Salvator Mundi" sold for ... ready for it ... $400 million; when you add the auction-house fee that the buyer has to pay, the (as yet anonymous) buyer will fork over an astounding $450.3 million

AP: https://apnews.com/9bf6e599d6f448eb8905a722544b7a11/Leonardo-da-Vinci's-Christ-painting-sells-for-record-$450M

Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2017/11/15/unimaginable-discovery-long-lost-da-vinci-painting-to-fetch-at-least-100-million-at-auction/

NY Times article on the sale (link includes video of the final minute of the 19-minute auction) https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/15/arts/design/leonardo-da-vinci-salvator-mundi-christies-auction.html

This NY Times critics says the painting ain't no "Mona Lisa": https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/15/arts/design/salvator-mundi-da-vinci-painting.html?action=click&contentCollection=Art%20%26%20Design&module=RelatedCoverage&region=Marginalia&pgtype=article


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« #126 : December 03, 2017, 12:39:17 AM »

new book on Pierre-Auguste Renoir, entitled "Renoir: An Intimate Biography," by Barbara Ehrlich White.

Here is a book review in WSJ


https://www.wsj.com/articles/review-renoir-and-beauty-in-the-face-of-adversity-1512161863

Review: ‘Renoir’ and Beauty in the Face of Adversity

By Maxwell Carter


Who was Pierre-Auguste Renoir ? A groundbreaking Impressionist or hidebound classicist? Outsider or establishment? Family man or heel? In 1904, C.L. de Moncade interviewed the 63-year-old artist, whose break with convention in the 1870s provoked outrage, for the opening of the Salon d’Automne. Moncade’s “stupefaction” was “complete”: “I thought I was going to meet an ardent, impetuous man, pacing feverishly the width and length of his studio, delivering indictments, demolishing established reputations, vindictive, if not full of hatred. . . .[Instead] he is a sweet old man, . . . who welcomes me with the most amiable cordiality.” Renoir’s peers shared Moncade’s bewilderment. Nearly 20 years earlier, Camille Pissarro wondered, “who can fathom that most inconsistent of men?” In her exhaustive biography, Barbara Ehrlich White takes up Pissarro’s challenge.

Renoir’s career was bookended by three decades of penurious struggle and another three of crippling infirmity. The first period informed his character, by turns bold and generous, guarded and practical; the latter tested his will.

His beginnings were nothing if not humble. In 1773, Renoir’s grandfather François had been abandoned on the steps of the Limoges cathedral, receiving his surname, Renouard, from the couple that adopted him. (Renouard became “Renoir” when François, an illiterate shoemaker, married in 1796.) Renoir was born in 1841. At age 4, his family moved to Paris.

Straitened circumstances forced Renoir to give up school at 12 or 13 and serve an apprenticeship with the Lévy Frères porcelain-painting workshop, where he copied rococo designs influenced by Jean-Antoine Watteau, Jean-Honoré Fragonard and François Boucher. His chief inspiration, however, was Peter Paul Rubens. (Co-workers jeeringly dubbed him “M. Rubens.”) Industrialization cost him his job in 1858; for the next several years, he earned money painting images on blinds and screens for apartments, shops and steamboats. Eventually, in November 1861, Renoir ceased paid artisan work and entered the popular teaching studio of the Swiss academician Charles Gleyre.

There he met Alfred Sisley, Frédéric Bazille and Claude Monet, and, shortly after, Paul Cézanne and Pissarro, who trained at the nearby Académie Suisse. “Renoir’s charming, gregarious nature allowed him to make friendships despite his lower-class origins,” Ms. White observes. His artistic circle soon widened to include Edgar Degas, Berthe Morisot, Mary Cassatt and their undisputed leader, Édouard Manet. During the 1860s, Renoir leaned on the embryonic group for fellowship, commissions and lodgings.

In September 1869, Renoir and Monet experimented side by side on the banks of the Seine. The resulting oils, Ms. White writes, introduced “characteristics now defined as Impressionist”—namely, “vibrant and varied hues as well as pervasive light tones . . . tiny, moving, brightly coloured strokes that suggest indistinct forms; blurred details; dissolved edges and lines; and eroded mass.”

“Renoir: An Intimate Biography” is Ms. White’s second study of the painter, drawing on an additional 2,000 letters made available since her “Renoir: His Life, Art, and Letters” appeared in 1984. Through Ms. White’s command of Renoir’s correspondence we get vivid glimpses of his inner life. Like Monet and Sisley, he fathered illegitimate children—in Renoir’s case, with Lise Tréhot, his principal model from 1866 to 1872. Unlike Monet and Sisley—who ultimately married their mistresses and legitimized their sons—Renoir “was too dependent on his friends’ support to feel enabled to have a wife and child.” He gave away his first-born, Pierre, while the existence of his daughter, Jeanne, was kept from all but his closest confidants. Even so, his commitment was unwavering. In one of the book’s more affecting passages, the ailing artist commiserates with Jeanne on her husband’s passing: “I have never abandoned you. I am doing what I can. . . . Never despair.”

Lise left Renoir for an architect with superior prospects in 1872. Around this time, Renoir connected with Paul Durand-Ruel, who would be his friend and dealer for almost 50 years, and contributed to the first Impressionist exhibition (1874) and auction (1875). Critical and commercial scorn prompted Renoir to refine the looseness and immediacy of his brushwork into “a variant, Realistic Impressionism” marked by heightened contrasts and an exquisite photographic effect. He produced “ Mme Charpentier and her Children” (1878), which launched Renoir’s fashionable portrait practice; “Luncheon of the Boating Party” (1881), now the pride of the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C.; and his magnificent trio of full-length dance panels (1883). These expressions of maternal, social and physical love are among his most lyrical and assured.

An unfamiliar prosperity emboldened Renoir to court his favorite model, Aline Charigot. Characteristically, he proceeded with caution, fathering another illegitimate child (curiously also named Pierre) before wedding Aline in 1890. They would have two more sons, the future filmmaker Jean, whose “Renoir, My Father” (1958) has long been the best-loved book about the artist, and Claude (or “Coco”). Durand-Ruel’s lucrative diversification in the American market smoothed the way for Renoir’s newfound stability. Durand-Ruel recalled, “Oh! Without America, I would have been lost, ruined, to have bought so many Monets and Renoirs.”

Renoir’s brief, unloved turn to an Impressionist style modeled on Ingres (1884-89), which juxtaposed precisely drawn figures and warm, feathery backdrops—the titular “Large Bathers” (1887) seem practically grafted onto their idyllic surroundings—gave way to an abiding classicism of thinly applied pigment and timeless, idealized forms. Guided by Rubens’s example, he depicted well-nourished nudes, deities and youths, paying tribute to the Flemish master in his 1908 and 1913 interpretations of “The Judgment of Paris.” By then, Renoir was one of the Grand Old Men of French painting, having won once-unimaginable official honors and public approval.

Those who dismiss or disparage these later works as sickly daubs should read Ms. White’s moving account of their making. Late Renoir acquires an undeniable grandeur set against the artist’s diminished health (emaciation, facial paralysis, extracted teeth, debilitating arthritis, gangrenous extremities) and private grief (the untimely deaths of Bazille, Manet, Morisot and Gustave Caillebotte ). Ms. White, whose portrayal of Renoir in decline is neither cloying nor gratuitous, accentuates the inverted relationship between the painter’s dismal reality and his life-affirming subjects.

Compared with Jean Renoir’s tender reminiscence, Ms. White’s approach may appear dry and workmanlike. Although her narrative sometimes drags (see the lumbering enumeration of the “four factors” responsible for Renoir’s use of anti-Semitic language: “First . . . Second . . . Third . . . ”), the contrast isn’t entirely unwelcome. As she stresses, the younger Renoir’s rose-tinted memoir is “historical fiction.” At any rate, Ms. White is reliably content to let Renoir speak for himself, allowing his grounded aims (“originality within tradition”), temperament (“you know what it is to be popular—it always starts well and always ends badly”) and wit (“if I only sold good things I’d die of hunger”) to shine through.

In 1918, Henri Matisse visited Renoir’s studio. “Monsieur,” Matisse began, “you cannot know the great pleasure you have given me.” Renoir replied with typical modesty: “You know, the person you are speaking to may not have done great things, but he did something all his own.”

--- Mr. Carter is the head of the Impressionist and modern art department at Christie’s in New York.



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« #127 : January 13, 2018, 10:49:47 PM »

The Phillips Collection in Washington, which owns Renoir's "Luncheon of the Boating Party," just had a big exhibit surrounding that painting.

I saw the painting when I was in Washington last January for the inauguration (eat your heart out, n_l), but wasn't there in the past few months and did not see the exhibit, which ended last week.

Here is the link to the exhibit, which is interesting

http://www.phillipscollection.org/events/2017-10-07-exhibition-renoir-and-friends


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« #128 : April 05, 2018, 02:55:58 PM »

Was at MoMA on Tuesday with Miss Hungary.

The highlight of our visit was the eight Giorgio de Chricos – all from his metaphysical period, of course. All are part of MoMA's collection, but I'd never seen eight displayed at one time. And I'd never seen some of these before.

I can't post pics directly here but I'll provide the links

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/78738

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/78736

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/80419

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/80587

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/79011

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/78834

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/80589

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/80591

Much of MoMA's de Chirico works come from the collection of the late James Thrall Soby, an art historian and assistant curator at MoMA, who also wrote an indispensable book on de Chrico's metaphysical period.

We also saw the usual MoMA treats, like Hopper's "New York Movie" https://www.moma.org/collection/works/79616  

Wyeth's "Christina's World" https://www.moma.org/audio/playlist/2/342
Van Gogh's "The Starry Night" https://www.moma.org/collection/works/79802

Miss Hungary was sad to hear that Dali's "The Persistence of Memory" is on loan now in Paris (not sure which museum; n_l can check on it and report back to us  ;) ) but I bought her a poster of it  :)

Being a modern-art museum, there were of course lots of shitty things there, including stuff known as "abstraction" (I would't even sully the word "artwork" by referring to them as such), we were sure to skip right past that crap  :)

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« #129 : April 05, 2018, 07:08:28 PM »

The highlight of our visit was the eight Giorgio de Chricos – all from his metaphysical period, of course. All are part of MoMA's collection, but I'd never seen eight displayed at one time. And I'd never seen some of these before.

Nice - did you feel the same inspiration as Leone did?

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« #130 : April 05, 2018, 11:39:34 PM »

So it was New York Movie.

I googled the persistence of memory associated with some French museums names, no results.
I’ll go to the museum of Orsay in a few days (I own the unlimited card so I go there every few weeks) and check out if it’s there.

The Chiricos room is something, isn’t it?

« : April 06, 2018, 06:07:08 AM noodles_leone »


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« #131 : April 06, 2018, 04:44:52 AM »

I’ll go to the museum of Orsay in a few days (I own the unlimited card so I go there every few weeks) and check out if it’s there.
Does this mean . . . Summer Hours 2 is coming?  :D



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« #132 : April 06, 2018, 06:06:53 AM »

Hey, convince them to give me the money!



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« #133 : April 08, 2018, 10:32:46 PM »

So it was New York Movie.

I googled the persistence of memory associated with some French museums names, no results.
I’ll go to the museum of Orsay in a few days (I own the unlimited card so I go there every few weeks) and check out if it’s there.

The Chiricos room is something, isn’t it?

Yeah, the de Chirico room is awesome. Thanks for informing me of it  O0

Sorry I didn’t catch the name of the Parisian museum. I just asked a MoMA staffer where “The Persistence of Memory” is and she simply said “Paris.” I should have asked which museum.

Yes, “New York Movie” is one of my favorite Hoppers  :)


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« #134 : April 09, 2018, 11:31:59 PM »

Actually, there were 10 de Chiricos on display at MoMA, not eight. Here are the two I forgot to include in the earlier post

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/80590

https://www.moma.org/collection/works/78956


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