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dave jenkins
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« on: November 26, 2012, 07:09:39 AM »

First reveiw: http://entertainment.time.com/2012/11/25/zero-dark-thirty-the-girl-who-got-bin-laden/

Yowza! December 19 cannot get here fast enough.

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« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2012, 03:09:35 PM »

Looks and sounds awesome. Afro In fairness though I didn't think much of The Hurt Locker. I'll keep my expectations measured accordingly.

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« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2012, 05:16:02 AM »

Dude, Jessica Chastain!

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« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2013, 09:49:23 PM »

Groggy sez:

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Kathryn Bigelow crafts a striking thriller in Zero Dark Thirty (2012). It's a powerful piece of work that depicts the War on Terror in a commendably complex manner.

Maya (Jessica Chastain) is a CIA analyst assigned to Pakistan in 2003. Maya helps a field agent (Jason Clarke) crack an al-Qaeda courier and tracks Abu Hamid, a high-level operative with ties to Khalid Sheikh Mohammed. Her investigation stalls when another informant declares Hamid dead, and when the CIA relocates resources to homeland defense. Years later, a new lead convinces Maya that Hamid's actually alive - and that he can lead the Agency to Osama Bin Laden himself.

Zero Dark Thirty began as a project about the 2001 attempts to nab Bin Laden at Tora Bora. Real life rewrote the plot of course, refocusing things on Bin Laden's death. Assorted media and political gasbags spouted off before its release, claiming the film an endorsement of torture, pro-Obama propaganda or flag-waving jingoism. Not surprisingly, these preliminary complaints are remarkably unjust.

Zero Dark Thirty operates on two levels. Bigelow and writer Mark Boal first present an unusually complex spy thriller. Maya finds her colleagues viewing Bin Laden through a pre-9/11 mindset: "You can't run a global network of interconnected cells from a cave." Human intelligence is flawed, electronic surveillance useless without hard leads. Political hurdles interfere: the Bush Administration downplays the hunt for Bin Laden, Barack Obama shuts down the CIA's detainee program. CIA bureaucrats are gun-shy after proclaiming Iraq a "slam dunk," delaying the operation by months. Only Maya's determination keeps things afloat.

Bigelow commendably downplays hot button issues. The film opens with a brutal torture scene, but the actual impact of "forceful interrogation" is secondary to analytical skills and luck. The detainee program, use of drones, electronic surveillance - heck, the legality of SEAL Team Six's raid - are unquestioned. The closest Bigelow comes to overt editorial comment is showing President Obama disavowing torture. The lack of an overt message may niggle liberal viewers, but it's Zero Dark Thirty's greatest strength.

Or second greatest strength, after its protagonist. Maya spends early scenes fitting into the man's world of intelligence, disarming colleagues with both her intelligence and coarse profanity. Virtually ignored in early scenes, she ends the film instinctively trusted by the CIA director (James Gandolfini) and Navy SEALs alike. One imagines Bigelow relating to this, gaining respect by besting her peers. Maya has only her gut feeling to confirm Bin Laden's presence in Abbotabad.


Unsurprisingly, Maya's obsession takes a mental toll. This takes an obvious form when one of her colleagues dies. More generally, she grows completely absorbed by her mission. Maya lacks a personal life, imbuing even friendly dinners with shop talk, clinging to her leads out of self-justification more than genuine conviction. Her entire life's been about hunting Bin Laden; the end of her quest leaves her drained rather than fulfilled. More than a feminist heroine, Maya symbolizes America's lingering obsession with terrorism.

If released two years earlier, Zero Dark Thirty might be a dark tale of obsession, a terrorist Zodiac. Instead Bigelow ends with SEAL Team Six's incredible mission. Truth be told, the climactic raid feels like a set-piece tacked on to an existing script. All the same, Bigelow handles it with remarkable skill, mixing handheld camera with night vision effects. It's an excellent finale, tense and exciting yet commendably muted. No rah-rah heroics, just numb relief. 

Jessica Chastain gives a flawless turn. She's not a complete blank slate, allowing humor and camaraderie to bleed through periodically. But the main impression is Chastain's bluntness, smarts and fierce dedication, whether coolly directing operations or telling off superiors. Chastain makes a commendably rounded heroine, easy to root for and emotionally sympathetic, and should nab this remarkable actress an Oscar.

Bigelow provides Chastain solid support. Jason Clarke (Public Enemies) as Maya's hard-nosed partner. Jennifer Ehle (The King's Speech) gets an affecting role playing a CIA friend with a poor prognosis. Kyle Chandler, James Gandolfini, Mark Strong (Kick-Ass) and Stephen Dillane (John Adams) play agency bigwigs who need convincing.

Zero Dark Thirty is remarkable. Smart, lucid and realistic, it joins Lincoln as a real-world drama for thinking adults. 8/10

http://nothingiswrittenfilm.blogspot.com/2013/01/zero-dark-thirty.html

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« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2013, 07:20:05 AM »

http://blogs.indiewire.com/thompsononhollywood/jessica-chastain-goes-where-few-actresses-have-before-with-top-two-films

Too bad one of them is an awful-looking horror movie (Mama), but still a nice accomplishment. Afro

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« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2013, 11:09:08 PM »

8/10


I'll copy my post from the RTLMYS thread http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=7645.msg162679#msg162679



I don't get y'all's fixation with Jessica Chastain; she is good not great, both in looks and acting performance.

That scene where she screams at her CIA boss to pay attention to her hunches, is so fucking pathetic I was laughing. She was awful in that scene; also in the scene where she says (paraphrasing) "some of my friends died doing this, I have to complete the job" is pretty bad.

Overall though, it's definitely not a bad performance. But it ain't worthy of any Best Actress award either. The fact that Chastain received an Oscar nomination is just the latest example of what a joke the Oscars are.

(For believable females in tough guy enforcement roles, I'll take Julianne Moore or Jodie Foster as Clarice Starling any day).

IMO the two great performances are by the lead males -- Jason Clarke, the CIA interrogator; and Reda Kateb, the terrorist he is interrogating.

I hated the chapter headings.

There is a little something missing that prevents it from reaching it's full potential, it is not a great movie, but it is a solid 8/10 and I do think everyone should see it at least once.

There is an opening subtitle that says the movie is based on true events based on the accounts of those who participated. I am sure that it's harder to determine that in the case of this movie than any other, due to the classified nature of some of the info; I have no clue how much of this is true, I'll leave that to the history buffs like Groggy to do the research on

I did not like the ending how it closes on Chastain crying; though the movie may be about her persistence paying off, once bin Laden was killed, it should have focused more on the happy aftermath of that rather than on Chastain's personal emotions.


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« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2013, 11:15:20 PM »

this week, The Weekend Interview in The Wall Street Journal was with Zero Dark Thirty producer Mark Boal

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324162304578306292338216514.html?mod=WSJ_Opinion_LEADTop

I'll cut and paste it in two separate posts, since it exceeds the 10,000 word limit for a single post



The Art and Politics of 'Zero Dark Thirty'

The man behind the film about the hunt for bin Laden talks about how he combined facts with imagination and calls his Senate critics 'intellectually dishonest.'


By MATTHEW KAMINSKI

Los Angeles

Ahead of the Academy Awards next Sunday, the ads and mailers for "Lincoln," "Argo" and "Silver Linings Playbook" resemble a political campaign. Then there's "Zero Dark Thirty." Nominated for best picture and in four other categories, the account of the manhunt for Osama bin Laden is caught in a real-life political storm.

"Zero Dark Thirty"—directed by Kathryn Bigelow and produced by Mark Boal—is as divisive and charged as any Hollywood film in memory. "The Hurt Locker," their film about the Iraq war, won six Oscars in 2009 and broad acclaim. This time the pair are having to defend their work against political attack—in Hollywood and Washington. The controversy has pushed the film, an early Oscar front-runner that has grossed nearly $100 million so far, out of the conversation about likely winners.

"Our movie was hijacked for political purposes," says Mr. Boal, who wrote the script based on his own reporting. One of the movie's Oscar nominations is for best original screenplay. Over a late lunch in Venice Beach earlier this week, the 40-year-old native New Yorker is funny, impassioned, defensive and irritated, sometimes in the same sentence.

"We tried to avoid partisanship—I couldn't have tried harder to avoid partisan politics," he says.

He seems to have failed. "No doubt," he shoots back.

Hints of trouble came early. After bin Laden's killing in May 2011, the Bigelow-Boal team shelved a planned film about the failure to capture the al Qaeda leader at Afghanistan's Tora Bora in late 2001 and jumped instead on the successful raid. Mr. Boal worked his sources at the CIA and elsewhere. Republican Rep. Peter King complained that a film made with CIA help might reveal confidential information and help President Obama's re-election campaign. Originally scheduled for an October 2012 release, "Zero Dark Thirty" was pushed past Election Day to Christmas. But then, when the film came out, it was liberals' turn to be outraged by the movie's depiction of CIA "enhanced interrogation techniques."

"In addition to providing false advertising for waterboarding, 'Zero Dark Thirty' endorses torture in several other subtle ways," wrote Jane Mayer in the New Yorker. In the Guardian, Naomi Wolf called Ms. Bigelow "an apologist for evil" and compared her to Leni Riefenstahl, Hitler's favorite documentarian. Actors Ed Asner and David Clennon started a campaign to deny any Academy Awards for "Zero Dark Thirty."

Washington politicians joined in. Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Carl Levin and Republican Sen. John McCain sent a letter in mid-December to the CEO of Sony Pictures, which distributed and promoted the film. "Zero Dark Thirty" is "grossly inaccurate and misleading," the senators wrote, urging Sony to "please consider correcting the impression that the CIA's use of coercive interrogation techniques led to the operation against Usama Bin Laden. It did not." Democrats on Ms. Feinstein's intelligence committee had just completed a classified investigation into CIA interrogation that reached the same conclusion.

In two separate letters to the acting head of the CIA, the Capitol Hill trio demanded to know if the filmmakers "could have been misled" by the agency about the efficacy of the interrogations. The lawmakers asked for "records of the meetings that occurred, notes, internal emails, Sametime [sic] communications and other documentation describing CIA interactions with the filmmakers."

The Senate investigators haven't contacted Mr. Boal or Ms. Bigelow, but last month Mr. Boal retained Jeffrey H. Smith, a prominent Washington lawyer. "They're just investigating the origins of a work of art," says Mr. Boal. Turning serious, he calls the letters "a mischaracterization" of the film "and intellectually dishonest."

The "Zero Dark Thirty" title sequence says that the movie is "based on firsthand accounts of actual events," and it opens with authentic audio recordings of people trapped in the World Trade Center towers moments before their collapse. Cut two years later to a CIA "black site" prison.

"I own you, Ammar," Daniel Stanton, the agency's man in Pakistan, tells an al Qaeda prisoner. Maya, a young CIA agent who is the film's heroine, watches. This is her first interrogation. An al Qaeda money man, Ammar is beaten up and waterboarded. The pair learn nothing.

The decade-long manhunt gets compressed into 2½ hours, culminating with the SEAL Team Six nighttime raid on bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. Maya and her colleagues miss clues, suffer setbacks, chase down false leads and fight internal battles over resources and strategy. She pushes one lead hardest: To find bin Laden, the U.S. needs to identify and find his most trusted courier, the real Abu Ahmed al-Kuwaiti. The film suggests that some information about al-Kuwaiti came indirectly as a result of harsh interrogations.

Mr. Boal is offering no apologies. "I think it's my right, by the way, if I firmly believe that bin Laden was killed by aliens, to depict that. And I should be able to put on there, 'This is 100% true and anyone who doubts it is themselves abducted by aliens' . . . without a Senate investigation into where I got that notion. Right? In this country, isn't that legit?"

As some film critics outside the Senate noted, "Zero Dark Thirty" doesn't claim that information obtained from harsh interrogations was central to the manhunt. The interrogations are, however, portrayed graphically and at length. Ali Soufan, a former FBI counterterrorist agent and author of "The Black Banners," says the movie leaves a false impression about their effectiveness. He and former Bush administration officials also say the abuse was never as bloody as shown on film.

On torture, Mr. Boal reverts to the factual default of a working journalist he once was. (Raised in Greenwich Village, he began his journalism career at the Village Voice and has written for Playboy, Rolling Stone and Mother Jones in parallel with his career in film.) "If you left that out, you'd be whitewashing history," he says. "Those things happened. They were done by Americans, some lawfully, some not." The White House approved, the Justice Department wrote the legal memos, Congress was briefed. Waterboarding was stopped by the middle of the Bush era, and President Obama closed the CIA's interrogation unit.

"I didn't support them, I didn't say I think they were moral, I have no idea if they were effective or not," says Mr. Boal. "My job as a storyteller is to be as honest as I can be with the underlying materials."

"Ammar" is a composite character largely based on Ammar al-Baluchi, the real-life nephew of al Qaeda leader Khalid Sheikh Mohammed—both of whom are imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay. According to Mr. Boal, the real Ammar was one of the captured al Qaeda fighters who helped lead the U.S. to the courier al-Kuwaiti, which in the film happens over a quiet meal. The real Ammar wasn't waterboarded, but that's why he's a composite, says the writer.

In another of Ammar's brutal interrogation scenes, however, he reveals no information about an imminent plot in Saudi Arabia. Cut to bearded Arab men laying siege to an apartment house in Khobar on May 29, 2004. "Cinematically—and I don't think these guys are critics and know what the f--- they're talking about—but cinematically it's not a case for the efficacy of torture to show them trying to prevent an attack and then the attack happens," Mr. Boal says.

"Now does that mean they can use the movie as a political platform to talk about what they've been wanting to talk about for years and years and years? Do I think that Feinstein used the movie as a publicity tool to get a conversation going about her report? I believe it," he says, referring to the intelligence committee's report on enhanced interrogations.

The senators' letter to Sony revealed another motive. Democrats had won the policy debate on terrorist interrogation and detention. But the senators wrote that polls show "a narrow majority of Americans" believe torture can be justified as a legitimate way to gather intelligence. "Zero Dark Thirty," they wrote, "has the potential to shape American public opinion in a disturbing and misleading manner." They don't want to reopen the debate.

"Let's be honest, what are we really going to do the next time there is a ticking time bomb situation?" says Mr. Boal, referring to a scenario of a suspect who might know of an imminent terrorist attack and isn't willing to talk. "I don't think that issue has really been resolved."

The film includes references to the 2005 terrorist attacks in London and five years later the foiled bombing in Times Square. Those scenes were interspersed to "bring home the real stakes" for the covert operatives, says Mr. Boal. "It's convenient to dismiss [the operatives] politically as either killers or spawned of Satan, but the truth is they're Americans faced with a job for which they get little credit from the press, for which they get little pay, and which is about life and death," he says. "When they make a mistake, people die."


continued next post

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« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2013, 11:16:25 PM »

article continued

One of the film's supporters is none other than Leon Panetta, the former CIA director portrayed in the film by James Gandolfini. The Feinstein letters cited Mr. Panetta's past statements about torture to criticize the film. "It's a good movie," Mr. Panetta told Agence France Presse in an interview this month. "There's no question that some of the intelligence gathered was a result of those efforts," he said, referring to the enhanced interrogations. "But I think it's difficult to say that they were the critical element. I think they were part of the vast puzzle that you had to put together in order to ultimately locate where bin Laden was."

"Zero Dark Thirty" is also unusual for a film in that it is an exercise in breakneck investigative reporting. No book was available to option and adapt, so Mr. Boal had to dig for real-life details that would dramatize one of the most important events of the decade. In so doing the movie raises questions about Hollywood's obligation to tell the truth in fiction—for example, can a film demand to be taken seriously as a work of journalism and entertainment?

"I'm not trying to have it both ways. It is both ways," Mr. Boal says. "Saying it's a movie is a fair and accurate description. Saying it's a movie based on firsthand accounts is a fair and accurate description. That's what gives it its power."

"Zero Dark Thirty" fictionalized some events and people to keep the story moving as well as to keep sources and U.S. operations safe. He says he won't say if he met the real-life Maya to protect his sourcing. As in the film, Maya's CIA colleague in Khost, Afghanistan, did bake a birthday cake for a top al Qaeda informant who was coming into their base, says Mr. Boal. The man turned out to be a double agent who exploded a suicide vest, killing five CIA operatives and two contractors in late 2009. As in the film, the real Maya, played by Jessica Chastain, "really did feel a religious sense of being spared" that day to carry on the hunt, he says.

The filmmakers reconstructed the Abbottabad raid also from "firsthand" accounts. "Zero Dark Thirty" was in postproduction when the book "No Easy Day," the first direct account by a member of the SEAL team, came out last summer. In the March Esquire, the soldier who shot bin Laden describes a close and direct confrontation with the al Qaeda leader. In the movie, bin Laden isn't shown and gets shot from the stairs. Such small details aside, the movie has held up well to subsequent revelations, but Mr. Boal says he will "never ever ever ever accept this [film] will be the last word."

Mr. Boal describes the movie's final scene to illustrate the blending of fact and imagination. After identifying bin Laden's corpse, Maya boards a C-130 transport plane to head back home. "The film at the end asks—the pilot at the end asks—'Where do you want to go?' " he says. "I think that's a pretty good question. That's why I wrote it.

"I'll tell you what else I know. There was a plane. It was a C-17, not a C-130. I couldn't afford a C-17. She really did fly alone. She was crying. Did the pilot say that? I highly doubt it. That's where it becomes a movie."

Other notable Hollywood films—"All the President's Men," "The Deer Hunter"—have been topical, timely and in their day controversial. "Show me a movie about real life that isn't controversial," says Mr. Boal, "and I'll probably show you a movie that nobody really saw."

-----------------------

Mr. Kaminski is a member of the Journal's editorial board.

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« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2013, 06:19:36 PM »

http://www.dvdtalk.com/dvdsavant/s4114zero.html

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« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2013, 01:32:02 AM »


As usual, I have no use for this review of Savant's.


"Jessica Chastain earned her Oscar nomination, no question... when Maya gets loud and insistent she betrays not a hit of hysteria or loss of control."


 IMO Chastain's performance was good but not great, and the scene where she screams at her boss that if he doesn't give her the resources she's requesting he's gonna be responsible for the failure to catch bin Laden (the scene that is shown on every "highlight" clip, including the one at the Oscars), is her worst scene in the movie; I don't know if it's "hysteria" or "loss of control" or what it is, but it's laughable.

"True to form, the Academy opted for the painless alternative, Argo."


IMO: No matter what you think of the politics of ZD30, Argo was the better movie and deserved the Best Picture Oscar. ZD30 was a damn fine movie, but not even the second-best of the year. (That distinction goes to Life of Pi).

"That's okay, as both movies are basically about American intelligence experts dealing with the consequences of American foreign policy of the past (that's the polite way to say it). The message may eventually seep through."


No matter what your political position is on foreign policy -- whether you believe America is completely to blame for the events leading up to Argo and/or ZD30; not to blame at all; or anywhere in the middle -- I think Savant is completely missing the point here, as usual. I don't think Argo was coming from any particular political perspective, and it's not discussing the events leading up to the taking of the American embassy; it was simply the story of how a plan was hatched to free six people. ZD30 starts with the events of September 11, 2001 and ends with the events of May 2, 2011; (while there has been some discussion about whether the movie takes a position on the issue of enhanced interrogation techniques or torture or whatever you want to call it), whatever political points are or aren't made by the depiction of events between those two dates, the point of the movie is certainly NOT to discuss the effect of prior American foreign policy on those events.

So while it may not technically be wrong (depending on your political beliefs) to say that the events of the movie were brought about by American foreign policy decisions of the past, that is completely missing the point. I don't think they are much more concerned with foreign policy leading up to the events of the embassy taking or 9/11, than Saving Private Ryan is concerned with the foreign policy decisions that led up to D-Day.

Savant may believe that American foreign policy is to blame for the events in these 2 movies,  and he may hope that "the message may eventually seep through" and America will change course from said policies, but I don't see how any reasonable reading of these movies can lead one to believe that that's the message of these movies. The objective of these movies are not to make points about prior foreign policy decisions.

The stuff about Jessica Chastain's performance or the Best Picture, that's just a matter of opinion. But the political stuff about the foreign policy message of the movies, I don't see how it's possible for any viewer OF ANY POLITICAL PERSUASION to see those messages in these movies. Maybe Savant is just projecting his political opinion onto movies that present no political opinion on those issues.

Savant is completely useless.


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« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2013, 06:23:55 AM »

Quote
I don't know if it's "hysteria" or "loss of control" or what it is, but it's laughable.


It's effective because it's one of the few moments Chastain lets down her guard in the whole film. Of course she's going to snap when her chance of getting Bin Laden is seemingly forfeited.

Quote
No matter what you think of the politics of ZD30, Argo was the better movie and deserved the Best Picture Oscar.


Politics has nothing to do with it. Zero Dark Thirty was a much better movie on pretty much every level. Argo was a slickly made genre product, nothing more or less, and I'm still baffled at its Best Picture Oscar. Of course, I liked Lincoln and Silver Linings Playbook more than either.

Quote
Savant may believe that American foreign policy is to blame for the events in these 2 movies,  and he may hope that "the message may eventually seep through" and America will change course from said policies, but I don't see how any reasonable reading of these movies can lead one to believe that that's the message of these movies.

Savant isn't saying it's the "message" of either. Learn to read more carefully.

Mind you, I agree that neither movie is intentionally political. I had a run-in with a bonehead on IMDB who thinks Argo is CIA propaganda. This misses the fact that the CIA is a) shown to be responsible, at least indirectly, for the Hostage Crisis through the coup against Mossadegh, b) is depicted as a bunch of bureaucratic morons obstructing Affleck's character every step of the way. The movie is however a pro-American story, if only for downplaying the Canadian role and its triumphalist conclusion (certainly having an ex-President narrate the end credits). Though I don't really care about "demonizing" the Iranians; if you worry about being mean to the Ayatollah Khomeini you've got messed-up priorities.

Most of the arguments re: Zero Dark Thirty center on its portrayal of torture, which to me is a blind alley. That's a relatively small portion of the movie for one. For another you have to really stretch to prove that point. True, "enhanced interrogation" produces a lead which eventually, years later, helps locate Bin Laden. But it's such a convoluted road getting there that it's hard to argue that torture = good. Bribery, intel agents and technology prove just as important and more immediately impactful.

Given Savant's left-leaning politics I was pleasantly surprised he liked Zero Dark Thirty. Aside from a few mutton-headed conservatives who thought the movie glorified the Obama Administration (how exactly?) most complaints have come from liberals who disliked the torture angle or seeming endorsement of the War on Terror. You can argue, as some will, that all movies are political in some shape or form. But ZDT is probably as close to "objective" as one could hope for a movie re: terrorism and counterterrorism; it shows the CIA making mistakes and engaging in brutal torture, but has little doubt of the mission's righteousness.

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« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2013, 07:27:15 AM »



Savant isn't saying it's the "message" of either. Learn to read more carefully.

Mind you, I agree that neither movie is intentionally political. I had a run-in with a bonehead on IMDB who thinks Argo is CIA propaganda. This misses the fact that the CIA is a) shown to be responsible, at least indirectly, for the Hostage Crisis through the coup against Mossadegh, b) is depicted as a bunch of bureaucratic morons obstructing Affleck's character every step of the way. The movie is however a pro-American story, if only for downplaying the Canadian role and its triumphalist conclusion (certainly having an ex-President narrate the end credits). Though I don't really care about "demonizing" the Iranians; if you worry about being mean to the Ayatollah Khomeini you've got messed-up priorities.

Most of the arguments re: Zero Dark Thirty center on its portrayal of torture, which to me is a blind alley. That's a relatively small portion of the movie for one. For another you have to really stretch to prove that point. True, "enhanced interrogation" produces a lead which eventually, years later, helps locate Bin Laden. But it's such a convoluted road getting there that it's hard to argue that torture = good. Bribery, intel agents and technology prove just as important and more immediately impactful.

Given Savant's left-leaning politics I was pleasantly surprised he liked Zero Dark Thirty. Aside from a few mutton-headed conservatives who thought the movie glorified the Obama Administration (how exactly?) most complaints have come from liberals who disliked the torture angle or seeming endorsement of the War on Terror. You can argue, as some will, that all movies are political in some shape or form. But ZDT is probably as close to "objective" as one could hope for a movie re: terrorism and counterterrorism; it shows the CIA making mistakes and engaging in brutal torture, but has little doubt of the mission's righteousness.

I quoted Savant's words precisely: he says the movie is basically about American intelligence officials dealing with the consequences of American foreign policy of the past.


In the very next sentence, Savant says that he hopes the message will eventually seep through, ie. he hoped America will change its foreign policy.  I think a "careful" reading tells you that Savant thinks THE MESSAGE of the movie is, this is the result of American foreign policy.

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« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2013, 07:33:15 AM »

Quote
In the very next sentence, Savant says that he hopes the message will eventually seep through, ie. he hoped America will change its foreign policy.  I think a "careful" tells you that Savant thinks THE MESSAGE of the movie is, this is the result of American foreign policy.

Not the explicit message of the movie. The message that American foreign policy often has deleterious consequences.

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« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2013, 07:37:19 AM »

Not the explicit message of the movie. The message that American foreign policy often has deleterious consequences.

so in a supposed review of ZD30 (and Argo) he says that he hopes that "the message" which is not mentioned in these movies seeps through? or was he just taking the opportunity of this movie review to state his political opinion on a very-peripherally related issue?

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« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2013, 07:38:20 AM »


It's effective because it's one of the few moments Chastain lets down her guard in the whole film. Of course she's going to snap when her chance of getting Bin Laden is seemingly forfeited.
 

I'm not saying it's wrong for the Chastain character to let her guard down and snap. I'm saying that IMO Chastain's performance in that scene is laughable

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