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Author Topic: Last Book You Read  (Read 219436 times)
titoli
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« Reply #1275 on: April 23, 2017, 10:30:14 PM »

If you like Barry Gifford then you should check out his writings on Film Noir. If you haven't already that is.



A couple of heads-up to little known movies, which I doubt though are worth the efffort. The most interesting snippets are those involving some autobiographical happenings. The reviews of the noirs themselves are generally not particularly deep, may be useful to beginners. 6/10

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Jessica Rabbit
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« Reply #1276 on: April 24, 2017, 08:31:23 AM »

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A couple of heads-up to little known movies, which I doubt though are worth the efffort.

But they ARE worth the effort. I can't even count the times when I stumbled on some (unjustly) forgotten little gem. Sure, there are lots of disappointments along the way, but it's great when you hit the jackpot.

I agree that Gifford's reviews aren't particularly deep, but he's an extremely gifted writer. It's joy to read his prose.

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Jessica Rabbit
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« Reply #1277 on: April 25, 2017, 06:55:45 AM »

I can't even count the times when I stumbled on some (unjustly) forgotten little gem. Sure, there are lots of disappointments along the way, but it's great when you hit the jackpot.

Indeed... I've not heard of the Gifford book before, so I'll have to find me a copy. It sounds great!

For obscure poverty row noirs, I can recommend 'Death on the Cheap' by Arthur Lyons. Love it, the first half of the book focuses on the rise & fall of the poverty row studios and how they operated, the second half contains small reviews of hundreds of obscure noirs & thrillers.


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Jessica Rabbit
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« Reply #1278 on: April 25, 2017, 09:08:01 AM »

Xh, I have Death on the Cheap and like it too. Another one I like is Eddie Muller's Dark City: The Lost World of Film Noir.


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Jessica Rabbit
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« Reply #1279 on: April 25, 2017, 11:30:42 AM »

Another one I like is Eddie Muller's Dark City: The Lost World of Film Noir.

I've not read it, but heard good things about it (and of course Eddie Muller knows his noir). One to add to the ever-expanding 'to get' list!  Smiley

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'I feel all dead inside. I'm backed up in a dark corner and I don't know who's hitting me.' - The Dark Corner (1946)
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« Reply #1280 on: April 25, 2017, 12:03:58 PM »



Some strange and interesting stuff.

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« Reply #1281 on: April 25, 2017, 12:35:52 PM »



Some strange and interesting stuff.
Bah. I gave it away. What about the above mentioned two on noir? i seem to remember you reviewed the Muller but can't find the post. Anyway I ordered both.

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cigar joe
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« Reply #1282 on: April 25, 2017, 04:24:51 PM »

The Muller is very good, the reason we can't find them maybe I just posted the image and didn't identify the title or author.

The Re Strange Films has some interesting info about the rise of Grindhouse Cinema from the late 50s from the interviews conducted within. I got some value out of it.

The other two are on my wish list.  Afro

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« Reply #1283 on: May 17, 2017, 04:34:14 PM »

I'm halfway reading both the Lyons and the Muller. Both are very good. Lyons is able to give a very complete though succinct view of the rise and fall of the genre, pointing up the most important productive conditions and stylistic traits of the movies. Not a word wasted. 10/10 Muller defines the genre by going through themes and personalities while describing the movies, with the help of great pictures. (Still I don't understand how he can apparently ignore that The Big Heat was based on a novel by McGivern). Though I like his style, I don't agree with his attitude to read more in the movies than what is actually to be found therein, so I give it 9/10.   

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stanton
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« Reply #1284 on: May 18, 2017, 02:20:51 AM »




The name of the film?

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« Reply #1285 on: May 18, 2017, 02:33:37 AM »

I am currently reading 'The Mugger' by Ed McBain. It is one of his 87th Precinct novels from the 1950s and his street dialogue is very much like the noir and crime films of the time. I don't think that this story got filmed like some of his stories. Most notably 'The Blackboard Jungle.'

He went on to write for Hitchcock 'The Birds' under the mane of Evan Hunter which I think may have been his real name. 'The Mugger' is good pulp-type writing with some little bit of poetic comparisons. He compares the city streets of the 87th Precinct to a wild woman and all her changing moods. So I think I will look out for more Ed McBain books.

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cigar joe
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« Reply #1286 on: May 18, 2017, 04:13:03 AM »

The name of the film?

The one on the cover?

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« Reply #1287 on: May 18, 2017, 05:19:19 AM »

The one on the cover?

Of course.

(Which one else?)

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cigar joe
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« Reply #1288 on: May 18, 2017, 05:10:27 PM »



The Mask (1961) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055151/?ref_=fn_tt_tt_3

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« Reply #1289 on: May 18, 2017, 10:08:06 PM »


There's an interesting note in the IMDB trivia section Slavko Vorkapich was once linked to this:

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According to a piece on the film in "Filmfax" (issue #25), Slavko Vorkapich's ideas for the 3-D sequences were ultimately too expensive to be used, and director Julian Roffman did much of the conceptual work himself. Vorkapich's name remained in the credits because of a "pay or play" option in his contract.

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