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Author Topic: Farewell, My Lovely (1975)  (Read 7517 times)
drinkanddestroy
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« on: February 11, 2013, 06:09:20 PM »

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072973/?ref_=sr_1

Farewell, My Lovely (1975)

Another film adaptation of Raymond Chandler's novel of the same name [the earlier film adaptation was Murder, My Sweet (1944)]

Cast, courtesy of imdb

Robert Mitchum    ...    Philip Marlowe
Charlotte Rampling    ...    Helen Grayle
John Ireland    ...    Det. Lt. Nulty
Sylvia Miles    ...    Jessie Halstead Florian
Anthony Zerbe    ...    Laird Brunette
Harry Dean Stanton    ...    Det. Billy Rolfe
Jack O'Halloran    ...    Moose Malloy
Joe Spinell    ...    Nick
Sylvester Stallone    ...    Jonnie
Kate Murtagh    ...    Frances Amthor
John O'Leary    ...    Lindsay Marriott
Walter McGinn    ...    Tommy Ray
Burton Gilliam    ...    Cowboy
Jim Thompson    ...    Judge Baxter Wilson Grayle
Jimmy Archer    ...    Georgie (as Jimmie Archer)


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In the Film Noir Discussion Thread, there are 3 posts about this movie (mostly comparing it to Murder, My Sweet)

here http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=1822.msg147410#msg147410

titoli: Murder My Sweet (1944) Though it is the 3d vision of the movie it was my first in english. And I didn't remember it took so many liberties with the plot which, in spite of my having read the novel repeatedly, I couldn't follow in depth. There was the good idea of making Ann Riordan Mr. Grayle's daughter, but eliminating the character completely, like Richards did, was even better. And that's about that. The gimmick of the temporary cecity of Marlowe's is just finalized to the final cheesy scene. The actors. As I said, Powell is my favourite Marlowe with Garner. But probably comes second. The girl playing Anne Riordan is perfect but, as said, the character is disposable. I take Trevor over Rampling just because I like her best. And I take O'Halloran over Mazurki because Moose is, literally, true to his name: Mazurki gives too much passion to a character who shows he has it in store only in the final meeting with Velma. The sanatorium scene is perfect, with a great Powell. That makes me give it a 8\10: still a vote under Richards's version.  
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here http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=1822.msg147908#msg147908

cigar joe: Murder My Sweet (1944) Watched this today, I too, even though I haven't read the book in years, was wondering why they deviated so much from the plot. I'll agree that in seeing it again that O"Halloran is the superior Malloy, thought I do like the "Pepper's Ghost" entrance of Malloy that is employed in this interpretation, the Richards film is superior and I believe more faithful to the book.  

Here are some screencaps from "Murder My Sweet"

The Pepper's ghost Malloy intro:





Velma:



Marlowe's Dali-esque drug induced hallucination:



One of my favorite sequences Marlowe lights a match off Cupid's ass:






This version ties up the loose ends in a beach house rather than on the gambling ship and the Burnette character is absent.  It also has a lame epilogue catering to the female audience.

Powell is great as Marlowe pretty much as I pictured him in my minds eye as I remember the book (Mitchum was just a tad too old and a tad too iconic, unfortunately), and I'll go with Rampling also she had a devious look in her eyes, Trevor wasn't as believable to me she played it a bit to "upper crust", all in all though, I prefer all the rest of the actors in the Richards version. 8/10 agreed.
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and here http://www.fistful-of-leone.com/forums/index.php?topic=1822.msg149814#msg149814

cigar joe: Farewell, My Lovely (1975) OK reviving this discussion.

For clarification and ease I'll abbreviate the film titles FML = Farewell My Lovely, and MMS = Murder My Sweet

Just finished reading Chandler's "Farewell My Lovely" and with the recent viewings of both films fresh in my mind I have to admit that they both deviate from the novel quite a bit in different areas.

Moose Malloy gets more memorable screen time in FML he becomes an almost sympathetic character in FML you end up caring for the dumb lug, less so in MMS. In the novel you barely get the character at all, which is reflected in MMS.

The character Ann Riordan is eliminated entirely from FML. The most likely reason being Mitchum's age, he's portrayed as a Marlowe in his declining years.

The whole scenario of how Marlowe finds Jessie Florian in FML is not in the book what is in the book is the hotel, and a clerk finds Florian with a City Directory.

The whole flashback sequence with the temporarily blinded Marlowe is a fabrication in MMS. But the hint of the love affair with Riordan is in the novel.

In novel there are two cops that Marlowe has to deal with Nulty, of LAPD and Randal of the Bay City Police in FML they are combined into just Nulty played by Ireland, in MYS the main cop is Randal.

Amthor in the novel is a psychic, in FML he becomes a she and a notorious LA madam and Amthor's and Dr, Sonderborg's sequences in the novel are combined into the same house, in MMS I think he's still a psychic but the way its played out in the novel is much more elaborately detailed and memorable than what is in the film. Interestingly there is a second big bruiser in the novel a henchman of Amthor called The Indian.

In the novel there are two ships off shore one is a whorehouse ship, one is a gambling ship. In FML there is only one ship, in MMS no ship.

In the novel the final denouement between Malloy and Velma takes place in Marlowe's apartment, she puts five bullets in him and escapes. In MMS it takes place in a beach house and Malloy and Velma kill each other and Marlowe is temporarily blinded by a close gunshot. In FML it takes place in Brunette's office on the gambling ship
and Malloy and Velma both die too.

In the novel Velma disappears again, becomes a brunette and is singing in a band again like what she used to do a Florian's but she is finally spotted by a cop back east who approaches her in the dressing room and confronts her, she guns him down then kills herself.

« Last Edit: July 31, 2013, 06:51:29 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2013, 04:33:45 AM »

Here are some screen caps from "Farewell My Lovely" side by side with me playing around with how it may have looked in B&W this really needs a  re-release Cool:

Marlowe's (Mitchum) opening monologue in a room at the Casa Miarabell Hotel, this version is told in flashback for probably 4/5 of the total:







Florian's







Moose Malloy



Jessie in tattered bathrobe



Then all dolled up for Marlowe



Jessi & Marlowe boozing it up (notice no noir barred shadows through the venetian blinds)





Femme Fatale (Charlotte Rampling) has a vague Bacall look about her.



Green eyes to match the jade necklace.



The flash of inner thigh to Marlowe.



The kiss.



Some nice three shot Compositions the top in Florian's the bottom at the Lido gambling ship:





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« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2013, 12:17:59 PM »

dvd's of this movie seem to be rare, they're going on Amazon for like 100 bucks, but you can get the digital download from iTunes or Amazon for $6.99. You can purchase dvd's from Greece on eBay for about $20, I have no idea what the quality is, whether they're legit, etc. PAL dvd's are also cheaper.

I got the digital download from iTunes -- the SD, not the HD. The image is decent; there is a lot of fuzziness in the background, the part of the image that is out of focus. (Maybe I shoulda paid the $12.99 for the HD 720p version; but it woulda taken more than double the space on my laptop 2.84 GB for HD vs. 1.19 GB for SD)

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« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2013, 12:46:20 PM »

With only 2,84 GB it can't be HD anyway.

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« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2013, 01:45:29 PM »

dvd's of this movie seem to be rare

Italian release at 7.50 euros:

http://www.ebay.it/itm/Marlowe-il-poliziotto-privato-1975-DVD-NEW-Sylvester-Stallone-Robert-Mitchum-/230860480527?pt=DVD_Cinema_Internazionale&hash=item35c05b600f

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« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2013, 01:52:50 PM »


yeah, it's the American dvd that is rare
(I noticed that ebay page lists the stars as "Sylvester Stallone, Robert Mitchum" in that order  Grin

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« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2013, 08:03:28 PM »

This is strangely one of the few movies where I think this entire board can agree on, though I'm sure there is one person who will have to ruin it.

This needs a bluray release in the worst way. I have a self-made dvr that's a really crappy transfer.

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« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2013, 06:49:42 PM »

After all this talk, I just watched the movie again. Good times. It gets an 8/10

The casting is all perfect, and the production design is just amazing.

Now I have to watch Murder, My Sweet again to compare

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« Reply #8 on: July 31, 2013, 08:59:09 AM »

Wasn't bad, just couldn't get into it too deep. Maybe it's not that strange, having not read the novels.


7/10

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« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2013, 08:55:30 AM »

Now it can be watched at youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mpIftdXefsE

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« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2014, 03:15:15 AM »

just watched the movie again, basically same opinion as before, it gets an 8/10. I still gotta re-watch Murder, My Sweet saw it once a long time ago to compare

one little point I'd quibble with: when Marlowe first meets Rampling, they start kissing immediately, right in her husband's home. That seems too fake, forcing the seductive female stuff. When they are making out later in the car, after the party, that makes sense, they have already met a couple of times by then. That should have been the first time we see them making out; the kissing on the couch 2 minutes after they meet in her home, that shoulda been deleted from the final cut.

The movie still doesn't have a normal American DVD release; my viewings have still all been on the digital file I bought from iTunes. At some point, I may spend the $12.99 to get the "HD" version (720p) from iTunes; but I figure it's gotta be released on disc eventually, no?  A solid movie, with a solid cast .... someone can make money off this if they get off their asses and release this. Maybe someone's gotta put in a request to Scorsese at The Film Foundation, or Muller at The Film Noir Foundation  Wink

Good times  Afro

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« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2014, 03:23:20 AM »

The only thing I don't understand is, when Moose and Marlowe first go to Florian's to ask about Velma, and Moose starts talking to the boss, Mr. Montgomery, Montgomery pulls out a gun and tries to kill Moose, so Moose has to kill Montgomery. Why does Montgomery pull out the gun? Is he also on Velma's payroll, to try to protect her? Seems that Velma worked there before it was "a colored joint," Montgomery would have no prior relationship with Velma. Did she just have one of her boys pay a visit to Montgomery and tell him that if a guy named Moose comes along, it would be worth Montgomery'$ while to plug him?

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« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2014, 06:38:32 PM »

I think Montgomery was just spooked by Malloy, a giant white guy acting crazy. He pulled the gun because he was scared--a mistake that led to his death.

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« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2014, 03:20:56 AM »

Yeah I guess so.
Even before Moose started speaking to Montgomery, the bartender pulled out a "sawed-off," before Marlowe advised him to put it away (since, as I recall, "it wouldn't stop him anyway" Cheesy ). So maybe these guys were indeed just spooked by Moose ...

btw, i think the Moose character in FML is a little too much of a caricature, too contrived, ridiculous. As I recall, the Moose character in MURDER, MY SWEET (which as I mentioned, I saw a long time ago, but I WILL see again soon to compare, it'll be the next movie I watch Wink ) makes more sense. He is a big tough guy (okay, not as big and tough, Mike Mazurski ~) but not in a silly way. In FML, the character is like, somebody could say to Moose, "Good morning" and his response would be to knock him down, he growls everything in the toughest meanest rudest voice possible even when it makes no sense - even when he says Velma was "cute as lace pants," he growls it. That is so over the top, it is silly. You can be big and tough and anti-social and growl without being silly.
Though somehow, in FML they actually try to make Moose into a sympathetic character (if you don't mind the fact that he is a bank robber who has 80,000 stolen dollars), by the end - just a lovesick guy looking for his Velma; yet it's clever how you the sympathetic moment only basically comes right at the end, once he is shot. (Actually, okay, a little earlier, when they go to Georgie's (the newsstand man's) house to set up the meeting with Velma then go to the motel; by that time you can already feel for the dumb brute.) But it's clever how they successfully make him sympathetic so suddenly. When they arrange the meeting and he speaks to Velma on the phone, and later can't believe she set him up, they successflly change him from just a big dumbass brute to sympathetic in almost an instant.
 And of course, a huuuge exa-boxer, great face, Jack O'Halloran was a great bit of ... production design!
Smiley

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« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2014, 04:38:07 AM »

The Film Noir Foundation is supposedly looking at doing a restoration.

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