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| | |-+  Leone's cinematographers: Dallamano vs. Delli Colli vs. Ruzzollini
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Author Topic: Leone's cinematographers: Dallamano vs. Delli Colli vs. Ruzzollini  (Read 4556 times)
noodles_leone
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« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2013, 01:23:35 AM »

Delli Colli is way better. The films he shot for Leone are made of 24 perfect paintings per second. Some exterior close up shots from OUATITW are among the best lightened ones I have ever seen.  This cannot be said for any other Leone film. And budget isn't the problem with close up.

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« Reply #16 on: June 06, 2013, 01:05:03 PM »

it's known how much Leone cared about his closeups; many directors would just shoot the closeups at the end of the day cuz they didn't care much about the lighting, whereas Leone would be sure to shoot the closeups during the day when there was good lighting.

another great thing about Leone's movies is that there is very rarely any process shots. so many other Westerns have process shots for the closeups, and i just friggin HATE HATE HATE process shots.

How many process shots can you think of in Leone's films? I didn't notice a single one in the Dollars films. Even the opening scene of FAFDM, on a moving train, where almost all movies would use process shots, doesn't look to me like a process shot. (and if it is a process shot, it's a mighty good one).

in OUATITW, it's possible -- though I am not certain -- that one of the closeups of Jill riding in Dam's buggy through the town is a process shot. And some of the moving scenes on Morton's train are process shots according to Frayling. Though they are mighty fine ones, I couldn't tell them on my own. (On the dvd "commentary," John Carpenter assumes some of the shots outside the saloon, in the scene with Frank and Harmonica are talking in the saloon, may be process shots, but he doesn't know for sure and I wouldn't trust a word he says on the movie).

In DYS, I can't think of one. Again, if the shots outside the moving stagecoach are process shots, they are mighty fine ones.

Finally, in OUATIA, the scenes of Noodles and Deborah in the car out the back window, maybe they are process shots.

Again, some of these are just me assuming that "maybe" they are, cuz usually you get process shots outside of moving vehicles. But IF they are, then they are the greatest process shots ever. There are virtually none of the very obvious awful process shots that so many movies seem to be in love with (I'm looking at you, Hitchcock) and which really diminish from a movie.

I remember some of the closeup scenes in Jesse James where Henry Fonda and Tyrone Power are being chased on horseback and you just see them bouncing up and down from the chest up, it's so obvious that they are just bouncing on some toy rocking horse in front of  a screen, it basically turns the movie into a cartoon

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noodles_leone
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« Reply #17 on: June 09, 2013, 04:49:54 AM »

it's known how much Leone cared about his closeups; many directors would just shoot the closeups at the end of the day cuz they didn't care much about the lighting

The main reason to shoot the close ups at the end of the day is because it's easier to shoot the master, so that everything that happens (people moving from A to B, items they interact with...) is clear for everyone, then the camera comes closer and closer. Hence, when youshoot the close up, the actor is only focused on his expression and the way he says his lines, and nothing else.
Also, some great ideas come when you try to get the master, so you usually end up doing different or more close up than there are on the shot list.


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« Reply #18 on: June 09, 2013, 05:13:55 AM »

The main reason to shoot the close ups at the end of the day is because it's easier to shoot the master, so that everything that happens (people moving from A to B, items they interact with...) is clear for everyone, then the camera comes closer and closer. Hence, when youshoot the close up, the actor is only focused on his expression and the way he says his lines, and nothing else.


yes, but then the lighting for the closeups isn't as good as the master. and that was the pointc- Leone was as concerned about the lighting for the closeups as he was for the masters. Look at so many Westerns; you have a master in brilliant afternoon lights, and a closeup with awful dark lighting in the background (or worse, a screen). It makes such a huge difference when the closeup is in good lighting. of course, it takes much more time that way. But that was the point - Leone took the time. (I believe this was discussed by Eastwood on the bonus features of one of the Dollars dvd's, but I am not certain).
On the blu ray commentary to GBU during the Trilello, , Frayling said something like the first 3 closeups of each actor took the best part of a day to shoot.

Imagine of the closeups in the Triello would be like most shitty directors, with bad lighting or even in a studio, maybe witha  screen in the background. That would make the Triello from perhaps the greatest scene ever, to just another crappy process-scene. It's that attention to detail, the extra yard, that Leone went (among many many other things) that makes his films so brilliant to look at. Imagine that -- put in the extra effort, maybe a few hours, maybe a few days, and now we are still enjoying the fruits of that extra effort (and money?) many decades later  Afro

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« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2013, 05:20:52 AM »

Actually no SW director used screens for the background or shot outdoor scenes on a soundstage. Except Mario Bava.

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« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2013, 05:23:44 AM »

well then good for the spag  Afro

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« Reply #21 on: June 09, 2013, 05:27:27 AM »

Kubrick shot all the scenes with the apes at the beginning of 2001 on a soundstage, and it looks marvellous. And real.

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« Reply #22 on: June 09, 2013, 11:05:04 AM »

yes, but then the lighting for the closeups isn't as good as the master. and that was the pointc- Leone was as concerned about the lighting for the closeups as he was for the masters. Look at so many Westerns; you have a master in brilliant afternoon lights, and a closeup with awful dark lighting in the background (or worse, a screen). It makes such a huge difference when the closeup is in good lighting. of course, it takes much more time that way. But that was the point - Leone took the time. (I believe this was discussed by Eastwood on the bonus features of one of the Dollars dvd's, but I am not certain).
On the blu ray commentary to GBU during the Trilello, , Frayling said something like the first 3 closeups of each actor took the best part of a day to shoot.

You can also notice that in the Leone westerns shot by Delli Colli, the masters that are shot outside are done near dawn or sunset, and usually in contre-jour: the sun acts as a huge back light. It looks much better this way.


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« Reply #23 on: June 10, 2013, 01:11:46 AM »

You can also notice that in the Leone westerns shot by Delli Colli, the masters that are shot outside are done near dawn or sunset, and usually in contre-jour: the sun acts as a huge back light. It looks much better this way.
Yeah, I was wondering what's all this talk about shooting close-ups last as if that was a bad thing. IMO too the most beautiful light appears near dawn or sunset just like you said. So shooting your close-ups near sunset would seem to me like making them your most valued shots of the day.

Of course you can build your own backlight for a close-up easier than for a wide shot, so in that way shooting your wides at the end of the day would make sense. But this still doesn't explain how leaving your close-ups last would mean you don't care about their lighting. Just look at Malick. He only shoots at sunset, close-ups and all, and it's the most beautiful stuff.

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« Reply #24 on: June 10, 2013, 02:38:22 PM »

I gotta check out those interviews sometime and get the exact quote. I think it's the Eastwood interview in the bonus features of one of the Dollars films

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« Reply #25 on: June 10, 2013, 09:02:29 PM »

Speaking of cinematography, this is a very interesting bts shot...

http://thumbs3.picclick.com/d/w1600/pict/151037246790_/OTW26-ONCE-UPON-A-TIME-IN-THE-WEST.jpg

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« Reply #26 on: June 11, 2013, 04:36:29 AM »

yes

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