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Author Topic: Presenting a Leone film on the big screen  (Read 3994 times)
Hudd
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« on: October 16, 2006, 11:25:09 AM »

Sorry if this has been answered or posted:

I have seen quite a few posts on here in regards to people wanting to "re-release" movies such as OUATITW and OUATIA so that they can see their favorite film up on the big screen. I have heard a lot of back and forth on how this is done, and I figure it would be best to tell how I did it.

Back in 2003 (I was 25 at the time) my friends and I were talking about how the best way to truly experience a Leone film was up on the big screen from a real print. So I looked into it and it is quite easy (albeit expensive), so I decided to do it. Here's what I did.

I went to a few of my favorite theaters (not-multiplexes, but smaller theaters that show smaller releases) and asked if any of them offered the option of renting out the theater. Most of the ones I went to in-fact did. These rentals were offered mainly for birthday parties and for corporate parties and events where people can show whatever movie is currently in-house at the theater. But they did offer an option to rent films from the distributors as well.

Since there had recently been the small revival at film festivals for The Good The Bad and The Ugly, I wanted to get my hands on the "Restored" version and watch it on the big screen. So I called the company that does all of the booking for the theaters (the local bay area one here is called: "Private Screenings" http://www.cameracinemas.com/privscreen.shtml) and they laid out the different options. Basically how much you pay is based on a few things:

1) The day you rent the theater on - it is cheaper on non-popular days. E.G. It is better to rent the theater on a Wednesday than a Friday night.
2) The movie you are renting.
3) How many people are coming.

So I chose their option that allowed for 50 people (everyone gets a wristband/sticker for admittance into the theater) with unlimited popcorn and soda. This meant that I was given 50 tickets to hand out (or sell - which i was told was legal) and those tickets granted whomever held one as many trips for popcorn and soda  as they desired during the film. The cost of this package was about $900. Then came the cost of the film rental. I was told that older films have a flat range of rental fee, and was told that something like GBU would be between $150 and $400 max to rent. Lucky for me, the rental of the restored version was $250. So in total the presentation of the film was around $1150.

Here is the downside: Most theaters require the renter to cover liability insurance. Liability insurance in CA can be covered by home-owners insurance (and renters insurance as well) as an added-on premium, but I did not have home-owners insurance at the time. Based on the number of people in the theater, the liability coverage amount was 1-Million dollars. AS crazy as it sounds, the cost for a 1 Million dollar liability  premium for one night is only around $18-30. But, since I didnt have insurance, I had to take out a policy for one evening. This was a pain in the butt to get (especially on short notice) and it ended up costing me $500 to insure the place for one evening. So now my presentation of GBU was at $1650 !!

Long story short, I did not sell tickets, I only invited friends of mine who were interested in the movie, and I created high-quality programmes for the evening with film facts, adverts for other Leone movies, and little mini "Wanted" posters of the three main characters. We had pizza served in the theater, and the theater was gracious enough to play my Morricone mix CD throughout the theater's sound system (you know, the music you hear while waiting for movies to start) for the evening.  Needless to say, it was awesome, especially for those who had only seen pan and scan versions on TV all their lives (we were a young crowd there that night- with only one or two people who were even alive when the film was originally released).

So I hope this clears up any questions people have of what it takes to get a movie back in the theaters for a night. If you have any questions, let me know.

Thanks

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« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2006, 12:41:07 PM »

In 2004 when restored GBU was released, no one in Phoenix screened the film.  We're like the 5th or 6th biggest city in US, but it's such a hick town.  It's the largest city in US without a medical school (one is under construction though), without Amtrak, without GBU screening....so there was a new complex with a GIANT screen theater in it opening, and I suggested restored GBU as the perfect way to "open" the new giant restored Cine Capri, but instead they screened there the ever-memorable Charlie's Angels 2.  There is also nearby a local "dinner theater" that serves dinner while you watch a film, usually screened are films just off the first run.  They replied that they usually don't do well with "vintage" films, so again no.  Congrats on your success. 

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« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2006, 03:24:11 PM »

Glad to hear you were able to experience a Leone film on the big screen. It's the only way to see it.

I was fortunate enough to see the restored version of GBU in a theater in Manhattan and even more lucky to see OUATITW on a HUGE cinema screen in Brooklyn.

Seeing OUATITW was the greatest cinema experience of my life.  Smiley

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« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2006, 04:09:44 PM »


I was fortunate enough to see the restored version of GBU in a theater in Manhattan and even more lucky to see OUATITW on a HUGE cinema screen in Brooklyn.

Seeing OUATITW was the greatest cinema experience of my life.  Smiley

I also saw the restored GBU at a theater. It looked great. I feel the same way about OUTIW, Peacemaker. I hope you still feel the same 30 years from now.  Wink


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« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2006, 04:11:58 PM »

I also saw the restored GBU at a theater. It looked great. I feel the same way about OUTIW, Peacemaker. I hope you still feel the same 30 years from now.  Wink



You bet I will.  Wink

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« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2006, 04:19:26 PM »

Thanks for the info Hudd

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« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2006, 06:12:55 PM »

Sorry if this has been answered or posted:

I have seen quite a few posts on here in regards to people wanting to "re-release" movies such as OUATITW and OUATIA so that they can see their favorite film up on the big screen. I have heard a lot of back and forth on how this is done, and I figure it would be best to tell how I did it.

Back in 2003 (I was 25 at the time) my friends and I were talking about how the best way to truly experience a Leone film was up on the big screen from a real print. So I looked into it and it is quite easy (albeit expensive), so I decided to do it. Here's what I did.

I went to a few of my favorite theaters (not-multiplexes, but smaller theaters that show smaller releases) and asked if any of them offered the option of renting out the theater. Most of the ones I went to in-fact did. These rentals were offered mainly for birthday parties and for corporate parties and events where people can show whatever movie is currently in-house at the theater. But they did offer an option to rent films from the distributors as well.

Since there had recently been the small revival at film festivals for The Good The Bad and The Ugly, I wanted to get my hands on the "Restored" version and watch it on the big screen. So I called the company that does all of the booking for the theaters (the local bay area one here is called: "Private Screenings" http://www.cameracinemas.com/privscreen.shtml) and they laid out the different options. Basically how much you pay is based on a few things:

1) The day you rent the theater on - it is cheaper on non-popular days. E.G. It is better to rent the theater on a Wednesday than a Friday night.
2) The movie you are renting.
3) How many people are coming.

So I chose their option that allowed for 50 people (everyone gets a wristband/sticker for admittance into the theater) with unlimited popcorn and soda. This meant that I was given 50 tickets to hand out (or sell - which i was told was legal) and those tickets granted whomever held one as many trips for popcorn and soda  as they desired during the film. The cost of this package was about $900. Then came the cost of the film rental. I was told that older films have a flat range of rental fee, and was told that something like GBU would be between $150 and $400 max to rent. Lucky for me, the rental of the restored version was $250. So in total the presentation of the film was around $1150.

Here is the downside: Most theaters require the renter to cover liability insurance. Liability insurance in CA can be covered by home-owners insurance (and renters insurance as well) as an added-on premium, but I did not have home-owners insurance at the time. Based on the number of people in the theater, the liability coverage amount was 1-Million dollars. AS crazy as it sounds, the cost for a 1 Million dollar liability  premium for one night is only around $18-30. But, since I didnt have insurance, I had to take out a policy for one evening. This was a pain in the butt to get (especially on short notice) and it ended up costing me $500 to insure the place for one evening. So now my presentation of GBU was at $1650 !!

Long story short, I did not sell tickets, I only invited friends of mine who were interested in the movie, and I created high-quality programmes for the evening with film facts, adverts for other Leone movies, and little mini "Wanted" posters of the three main characters. We had pizza served in the theater, and the theater was gracious enough to play my Morricone mix CD throughout the theater's sound system (you know, the music you hear while waiting for movies to start) for the evening.  Needless to say, it was awesome, especially for those who had only seen pan and scan versions on TV all their lives (we were a young crowd there that night- with only one or two people who were even alive when the film was originally released).

So I hope this clears up any questions people have of what it takes to get a movie back in the theaters for a night. If you have any questions, let me know.

Thanks

Dude,You have LITERALLY saved my life.I posted something about viewing OUATIA on the big screen and i really didnt get anywhere.But since you posted this im glad its not that much.But the BIG downside is i dont have any friends that actually want to watch a "Wannabe Godfather" as they say.

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« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2006, 07:09:06 PM »

That is truly great. I have never seen a Leone film in a theater.

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« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2007, 05:16:27 AM »

Anybody know what it costs for a new first run film comparatively?

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« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2007, 08:04:48 AM »

I believe the only difference would be that instead of paying 250 to rent gbu for the evening is that you pay a flat fee or a certain percentage of the money made from selling tickets, whichever is higher, thats the way it works for first run films...

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« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2007, 05:22:53 PM »

thanks

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« Reply #11 on: March 15, 2013, 01:43:58 AM »

I wish they had theatres which screen old movies where I live, there were a few but they shut down a couple of years ago.

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« Reply #12 on: March 15, 2013, 02:32:05 AM »

well here in New York we have Film Forum in Greenwich Village which shows classic movies all the time (in addition to current documentary and arthouse films http://filmforum.com/

I have seen GBU and OUATIA there, among other classic movies. But unfortunately the screen is tiny and the sound system is not very good. I really wish it had a screen and sound system like a multiplex.

But it's a pretty cool place, even if it does only have  a "medium screen."  Wink

 Federico Fellini was one of those who establishing it, one of the ushers told me that he either raised or donated the initial funds to get it started; one of the paintings on the wall in the lobby was made by him







There's another theater just a few blocks away called IFC Center that also shows classic movies along with current documentaries/arthouse films, but I've never gone there http://www.ifccenter.com/

 I can't imagine how awesome it would be to see Leone's movies on a real huge screen with booming sound  Smiley   Maybe I should follow Hudd's advice and rent out a big theater sometime! The two theaters with the biggest screens I have seen in NY are the UA in Sheepshead Bay in Brooklyn, and the AMC on 34th St. bet. 8th and 9th Aves. in Manhattan. I am sure those multiplexes in the city would charge a lot more to rent out (if it's even available at all!) than the ones Hudd was talking about.

« Last Edit: March 15, 2013, 03:12:06 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2013, 03:25:43 AM »

Just imagine Leone's movies in IMAX.


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