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drinkanddestroy
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« on: April 02, 2013, 08:05:31 PM »

Baseball season just started, and coming out next week is the movie....

42 (2013)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0453562/?ref_=sr_1

The story of Jackie Robinson, who broke baseball's color barrier in 1947. Chadwick Boseman plays Robinson; Harrison Ford plays Branch Rickey, the Brooklyn Dodgers' general manager whose idea it was to sign Robinson and integrate baseball.

I'll try to see this as soon as it is released.

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« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2013, 12:12:15 PM »

saw the movie on Saturday night, at the Regal on 42nd.

I give it a 7.5/10

I'll quote a little from Richard Roeper, cuz this is spot-on:

That this all happened in 1947 — history recent enough there are people around who remember it — might come as shocking news to younger generations who know little about Jackie Robinson other than that his number 42 being universally retired because he broke baseball’s shameful color barrier. For this reason alone, “42” is a valuable film — a long overdue, serious big-screen biopic about one of the most important American pioneers of the 20th century.

But this is more a ground-rule double than a grand slam.

As written and directed by Brian Helgeland, “42” is competent, occasionally rousing and historically respectful — but it rarely rises above standard, old-fashioned biography fare. It’s a mostly unexceptional film about an exceptional man........ it falls short of Hall of Fame status. Jackie Robinson was great. “42” is good.


I really, really wanted to love this, (though I wasn't necessarily expecting to); I spent an enjoyable 128 minutes (despite lots of time cringing, and sometimes nearly crying, at the abuse Robinson had to endure), though this won't be on any list of great movies.

I'm sure every American and many others know Robinson's basic story; being a huge fan of baseball history, I probably know a bit more detailed. I was particularly looking forward to the movie's production design, to see how it would re-create 1947, especially Ebbets Field and the other National League ballparks. Obviously, the stadium re-creations have to be done with CGI, there's no other way to do it unless you have a billion-dollar budget; but IMO they did a terrific job. I just loved seeing the portrayals of the old ballparks, most of which I have only seen in black and white photos.

The baseball action is pretty good. There are a couple of times where Chadwick Boseman, as Jackie Robinson, swings a bat in a manner I thought unconvincing (he just swings his arms and barely movies his body; it is impossible to hit that way) but other than those couple of swings, the baseball action is good.

I was also really looking forward to seeing Chadwick Boseman as Robinson, and Harrison Ford as Branch Rickey, the Dodgers general manager who brought Robinson to big leagues. They are both good, but IMO, nothing spectacular. The really terrific performance comes from the lovely Nicole Beharie as Jackie's wife Rachel Robinson.

Here is the real Branck Rickey on What's My Line http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPV-O_caBrs (note that by the time he appeared on this show, he was no longer the general manager of the Dodgers, but he was the president of a new league, the Continental League, which never really came about. It's significant for the line of questioning. Anyway, I don't think Harrison Ford gets his accent/speech mannerism down right).

As for the historical stuff: firstly, Leo Durocher was known to be a very feisty, fiery guy; I wish they would have had his character do some more screaming and spitting and yelling before he was suspended. As far as the suspension: though the Catholic Youth Association's protest over Durocher's violation of divorce laws definitely had something to do with it, that was not the official reason for his suspension for the 1947 season; the official reason was Durocher being too close with gamblers; baseball has always had a thing about gambling, ever since the 1919 World Series was thrown by the Chicago White Sox. Was the gambling thing just an excuse for the real reason was to appease the Catholic Youth Association? Maybe. But the movie portrays it as being a straight-up thing to appease the Ctaholics who were upset at Durocher's sexual indiscretions, and there is no mention of the gamblers.

« Last Edit: April 29, 2013, 12:24:15 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2013, 12:48:07 AM »

http://espn.go.com/new-york/mlb/story/_/id/9547574/vandals-paint-swastika-racial-epithets-jackie-robinson-pee-wee-reese-statue-brooklyn

August 7, 2013

By Adam Rubin | ESPNNewYork.com 

NEW YORK -- Employees of the Class A Brooklyn Cyclones, a New York Mets affiliate, arrived at work Wednesday morning to find swastikas and racial and anti-Semitic epithets painted on a statue of Jackie Robinson and Pee Wee Reese that is on display outside MCU Park.

The statue shows Reese with his arm around Robinson and commemorates the moment at Cincinnati's Crosley Field when Reese, playing before his family, showed his solidarity with Robinson amid ugly backlash about the integration of Major League Baseball. The moment was recreated in the recent movie "42."

The New York City Police Department is investigating the incident at the Coney Island ballpark. There is video surveillance outside the ballpark, a Cyclones spokesman said.

"This is being treated as a bias crime," detective John Nevandro of the 60th precinct said in a statement. "Hate Crimes will investigate the incident."

Team employees successfully removed the graffiti from the metallic statue but were having difficulty eradicating it from the stone base. They covered up what could not be removed so fans were not subjected to seeing the epithets upon arriving for a day game between the Brooklyn Cyclones and Connecticut Tigers.

The New York City Parks Department, which is charged with maintaining the statue, has dispatched help to treat the statue's base.

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