Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 16, 2017, 06:10:21 AM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Films of Sergio Leone
| |-+  The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  Shooting Schedule
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Shooting Schedule  (Read 4469 times)
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5114


Lonesome Billy


View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2013, 04:39:14 AM »

It's amazing to me since Scorsese:

- as a cinephile, has a very strong culture of the image (although still not masters it as a filmmaker)
- uses editing as main way of telling a story/expressing himself
- is a great technician who works "old school" (camerawork fully prepared in advance, Hitchcock's style)

I would have thought Leone would have had a greater influence on him.
Also, when you watch Gangs Of New York, the shadow of OUATITW is all over the place. I've read critics calling the film "Once Upon A Time In The East", which seems adequate for me in terms of influences.

« Last Edit: September 08, 2013, 04:42:09 AM by noodles_leone » Logged


New music video: ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE https://youtu.be/p968oyMo5B0
www.ThibautOskian.com
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12783


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: September 08, 2013, 05:12:41 AM »

It's amazing to me since Scorsese:

- as a cinephile, has a very strong culture of the image (although still not masters it as a filmmaker)
- uses editing as main way of telling a story/expressing himself
- is a great technician who works "old school" (camerawork fully prepared in advance, Hitchcock's style)

I would have thought Leone would have had a greater influence on him.
Also, when you watch Gangs Of New York, the shadow of OUATITW is all over the place. I've read critics calling the film "Once Upon A Time In The East", which seems adequate for me in terms of influences.

Yea I'd agree with this^

I wonder if he saw the butchered version first?

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8447

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2014, 04:08:26 AM »

Okay I just read parts of ONCE UPON A TIME IN ITALY again, the companion book to the Leone exhibit at the Autry museum from 2005, which contains the full text of Frayling's interviews with various Leone collaborators, as well as his interview with Scorsese.

Scorsese actually did see Leone's movies before he heard that speech by Steiger (so Frayling misquoted him in the DYS dvd commentary) but he didn't really like Leone's movies at first; it was that speech by Steiger that alerted Scorsese to take Leone seriously, that Leone was a great director. (Scorsese says the speech was in 1969; he is obviously wrong about that, since DYS wasn't made till the early 70's). Scorsese says that he didn't like Leone's movies when he first saw them (first GBU and then OUATITW), but over some years, OUATITW was played repeatedly on TV, and Scorsese used to have the TV on the background, and eventually he came to appreciate Leone's movies. OUATITW is his favorite Leone film.

The interview is on pp. 201-205 of the book.

I'll just copy a small portion here, the portion where he talks about that speech by Steiger; it's on page 204, first column, bottom paragraph (all emphases are in the text) :


The first time I really heard anyone talk about Sergio Leone as a movie god, in a way, was a movie talk that Rod Steiger gave in a loft down on Great Jones Street in New York in the late 1960's. And he held us rapturous. We watched him with rapt attention, as he spoke about Hollywood and his work and that sort of thing - he felt that one of the greatest people he ever worked with was Leone, because of his love of actors. And the way he photographed actors and let actors move along at such a pace that you can get such incredible detail from their eyes, and their facial structure, and that sort of thing, and... it was the first time I had ever really understood what Leone was about. It was after I'd seen OUATITW; it must have been around 1969 that this happened. Also, Rod Steiger brought up the point - it was the first time I began to realize it - that there is no classical theatrical tradition in Italy; the theatrical tradition they do have is opera. And so maybe that was planted in my mind, when after a few years later - I'd seen OUATITW on television so many times - the music mixed with the images, and that suggestion by Rod Steiger, together made me begin to understand that I was not to judge the Leone films with the same criteria as the American Westerns. This was a very, very different thing.



Scorsese also says the choreography of the camera in the final duel of OUATITW influenced films like Raging Bull and The Color of Money (btw, I happen to LOVE the camera work in TCOM).


« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 04:11:34 AM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13707

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2014, 10:10:19 AM »

(btw, I happen to LOVE the camera work in TCOM).
Good, 'cause there's nothing else in the film to love.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
Pages: 1 [2] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.026 seconds with 19 queries.