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| | |-+  Bicycle Thieves (1948)
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Author Topic: Bicycle Thieves (1948)  (Read 9223 times)
dave jenkins
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« Reply #15 on: January 15, 2007, 05:48:48 PM »

"Ladri" being plural, it should be (and is in UK prints), but for some strange reason it has been "singularised" (if that's even a word?) in the US.
Juan Miranda is of course correct, the U.K. title is the better translation of the title. But titles don't have to be literally translated when films move between cultures. An example of this is Wenders' Wings of Desire, which in German was (and is) Der Himmel Uber Berlin. Wenders actually claims to have come to prefer the English-language title. And there are many examples where titles in one language work better in a second language with a bit of tweaking. Readers of this board will naturally think of the BBC/GBU case: word order changed due to alliteration and cadance.

I've never liked Bicycle Thieves as a title because it gives too much of the plot away. The Bicycle Thief, however, doesn't accurately convey what the film is about. Anyway, I think both titles give too much attention to the theft/thefts, when really the film is mostly about the quest for the missing bike. So, my preferred title, is simply The Bicycle. Don't expect to win any converts to this idea, however.

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« Reply #16 on: January 15, 2007, 05:54:07 PM »



I've never liked Bicycle Thieves as a title because it gives too much of the plot away.

How so?




SPOILER AHEAD






There is only one thief and the main character never catches up with him. Unless your counting the scene where he himself tries to steal a bike.














SPOILER ENDS (as does my post).

« Last Edit: January 15, 2007, 06:13:36 PM by The Firecracker » Logged



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dave jenkins
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« Reply #17 on: January 15, 2007, 06:00:47 PM »

That IS what I was speaking of, but I was hoping to keep that bit of info back for those who have yet to see the film. Sad

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« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2007, 06:14:05 PM »

Taken care of.

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« Reply #19 on: July 06, 2009, 08:22:18 AM »

Juan Miranda is of course correct, the U.K. title is the better translation of the title. But titles don't have to be literally translated when films move between cultures. An example of this is Wenders' Wings of Desire, which in German was (and is) Der Himmel Uber Berlin. Wenders actually claims to have come to prefer the English-language title. And there are many examples where titles in one language work better in a second language with a bit of tweaking. Readers of this board will naturally think of the BBC/GBU case: word order changed due to alliteration and cadance.

Good point, and I can see arguments for both. I wonder which De Sica would have preferred if asked (or was he ever?). Personally I think a literal translation is better as it respects his original title unless he suggests otherwise.

This also made me think of Corbucci's "Gli Specialisti" which has predominantly French actors and the main shooting language appears to have been French (hence the language in which it should be watched). In French, it is called "Le Specialiste" meaning "The Specialist" (as the US title) but the Italian title means "The Specialists". Now to be faithful to Corbucci, the plural should perhaps be maintained but seeing as this is a French dominated work, perhaps the singular should be preferred. A singular title also makes more sense as Hud is the only "specialist" although perhaps the plural title is also referring to his brother Charlie who he is avenging?

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« Reply #20 on: July 06, 2009, 08:44:18 AM »

If any of you have seen this piece of classic Italian cinema, perhaps you know that Sergio Leone is in it.  I'm not quite sure who he is, but there is a scene where a bunch of students, I believe, are huddling under an umbrela, and one of them is Leone.  He was described to me as "the one wearing glasses", although several of the men are wearing glasses.

I just thought this would be an interesting piece of trivia.

Leone actually gets about 15-20 seconds camera time. He is shown chatting back and forth between the guy off-screen to his left (as in the picture below) and across the main character (Alberto Ricci played by Lamberto Maggiorani) with the one on his far right:



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« Reply #21 on: November 18, 2017, 05:41:34 PM »

I don't like subtitled movies, thus i don't get into foreign films, but i think i'm gonna make a exception for this one.  It looks soo promising, that hopefully the film can make me wanna watch more foreign films which are subtitled.

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