Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 14, 2017, 03:09:18 AM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  The Nickel Ride (1974) Death of the Key Man
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: The Nickel Ride (1974) Death of the Key Man  (Read 1051 times)
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12781


easy come easy go


View Profile
« on: January 21, 2016, 03:33:45 PM »

LA Smog Noir, circa 1974, directed by Robert Mulligan (The Rat Race (1960), To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), Summer of '42 (1971),) Cinematography was by Jordan Cronenweth (Blade Runner (1982)). It was written by Eric Roth (The Drowning Pool (1975)) and stars Jason Miller as Cooper, Linda Haynes as Sarah, Victor French as Paddie, John Hillerman as Carl, Bo Hopkins as Turner, Richard Evans as Bobby, Bart Burns as Elias, Lou Frizzell as Paulie, Mark Gordon as Tonozzi.



Cooper "Coop", is a small but successful cog in the LA underworld. He on top of his world, He is a fence, receiving stolen goods which he stores in the various warehouses around 5th Street in downtown LA. He is known as the "Key Man" for the large ring of keys he always carries. Business is booming, and there is a serious shortage of storage space.


Coop

The film begins at night, a tractor-trailer backs up to a loading dock. The hijackers pile out and a hood in a seersucker suit and straw hat beats on the sliding steel door of a warehouse as the rest of the crew unload the goods. The watchman opens up the door and tells the hood in the seersucker there is no room.





Cooper has been cobbling a deal to get "the block" a very large brick warehouse complex, 400,000 square feet, with rail spurs, comprising nineteen addresses, that sits on a full city block down in the 5th and Alameda district. It will be "like Grand Central Station". The word is out that the old street boss is losing control, if he doesn't deliver this block, 5th Street goes down the toilet and he'll go with it. The deal is in limbo because crooked LAPD official Elias and his downtown cronies are dragging ass, wanting more juice. Cooper's immediate boss Carl is putting pressure on him to get it done. Carl's bosses are a new breed, razor cuts, bookkeepers and lawyers who don't understand the streets.


Coop and Carl

Carl also has Coop lean on boxing manager Paulie. He wants, to have boxer Tonozzi, who has been making a bit of a comeback, take one last dive in his next bout. When Tonozzi doesn't deliver, Carl thinks Coop is slipping. Coop tells Paulie to leave town but Carl's goons get to him first. Carl also hires a goofy looking enforcer named Turner, a quasi hippy-ish, off-putting hayseed imported from Texas who wears a cowboy hat and boots with denim bell bottom jeans and a jacket embroidered with flowers on the front and a marijuana leaf on the back.


Turner

Coop has been on the job for 19 years, an ex carney, con man who worked his way West to LA then up the crime ladder. He has a live in gal pal Sarah who was working as a keno gal in Vegas when he found her, but in one sequence she demonstrates some bumps and grinds to Coop and his long time friend Paddie, the owner of the local bar.  Coop's become a respected and loved 5th street neighborhood fixture, his friends and the patrons of Paddie's  even throw him a surprise birthday party. This respect and love proves his undoing, the new breed of crook wants to rule on fear and brutality and Coop is coming to the end of his nickel ride.


The Street



Jason Miller is practically a double for Charles McGraw without the gravelly voice, there are some great believable performances here from Victor French (who you won't recognize) he comes off as an interesting mix of Art Carney and Walter Matthau,  and from Linda Haynes the smalltown born, ex Vegas showgirl. The side story of Coop and Sarah and their affection for each other is well done. John Hillerman is the "Hollywood-ish" mob underboss, and Bo Hopkins is outlandish as the politely creepy "Cadillac Cowboy" hit man. This film builds slowly in tension much like Night And The City (1950) does.


The Block


Sarah


Paddie

The noir-ish cinematography is excellent, emphasising gritty, smoggy, downtown LA, an LA that's slowly succumbing to high rises and parking lots, but it also is juxtaposed by nicely composed 2.35 : 1 widescreen closeups and also throws in a sequence reminiscent of the Big Bear Lake segment featured in the Van Heflin-Robert Ryan Noir Act Of Violence (1948) The subtle soundtrack nicely compliments the storyline. 8/10. The DVD is from Shout Video.


« Last Edit: May 16, 2017, 04:45:10 AM by cigar joe » Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
titoli
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8010



View Profile
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2016, 04:11:07 PM »

Hadn't you already reviewed it? Roll Eyes Anyway, I saw it a long time ago and put me to sleep.

Logged

cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12781


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2016, 04:16:13 AM »

Hadn't you already reviewed it? Roll Eyes Anyway, I saw it a long time ago and put me to sleep.

I just did a short two sentence review in rate the last movie you saw.  You may want to watch again it's not an action film, it's more akin to Night and the City 1950

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
titoli
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8010



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2016, 03:44:07 AM »

I liked it better this time. Still the whole story is full of potholes: why should Carl (Hillerman just can't play: terrible voice and delivery) get rid of him when he knows that the block affair doesn't depend on the keyman? And what Hopkins is waiting for? if he must kill him up at the cabin (he steals his gun to do what? Or does Coop really believe it was a vagabond who forced his entry)? And why Coop takes his girl with him when he suspects he is a target? And insists on leaving her alone when he just have to go to the hotel or to make a call, causing that violent spat? And what is he waiting for to follow her to Las Vegas? What does he have to talk with Carl about? And the finale: has it got any sense?   

Logged

cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12781


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2016, 04:07:58 PM »

I liked it better this time. Still the whole story is full of potholes: why should Carl (Hillerman just can't play: terrible voice and delivery) get rid of him when he knows that the block affair doesn't depend on the keyman?

I think they are just forcing him out, and using that as an excuse. The failure to have Tonozzi take the dive, and then going easy on the trainer, i.e., Coop telling the trainer to skip out of town. Then also his 5th street racket collections keep getting smaller, indicates he's getting soft. He's loved rather than feared. Then he attacks Carl's driver/bodyguard in the elevator too boot.

Quote

 And what Hopkins is waiting for? if he must kill him up at the cabin (he steals his gun to do what? Or does Coop really believe it was a vagabond who forced his entry)?

This one I'd have to watch it again to comment.

Quote
And why Coop takes his girl with him when he suspects he is a target? And insists on leaving her alone when he just have to go to the hotel or to make a call, causing that violent spat? And what is he waiting for to follow her to Las Vegas?

He's in denial,  He goes one last time to Elias to see WTF is going on.

Quote
What does he have to talk with Carl about?

Wasn't that just the setup to have Turner try and unsettle him, get him off balance, before trying to kill him?

Quote
And the finale: has it got any sense?   

Which finale, the very end where he goes to die sitting one last in his regular spot king of his domain on 5th street?

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
titoli
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8010



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2016, 05:44:23 PM »

I think they are just forcing him out, and using that as an excuse. The failure to have Tonozzi take the dive, and then going easy on the trainer, i.e., Coop telling the trainer to skip out of town. Then also his 5th street racket collections keep getting smaller, indicates he's getting soft. He's loved rather than feared. Then he attacks Carl's driver/bodyguard in the elevator too boot.

But everything is decided before Coop shows softness. Carl amply justifies the dwindling takes, doesn't seem to put the blame on Coop. And Hopkins is introduced at the arena  before the match. So of course the failed set up is not a reason.

Quote
He's in denial,  He goes one last time to Elias to see WTF is going on.

I think that after he's been told that Elias is not at the hotel and there's not reservation in his name he has no reason to remain there if not for those scenes of thrill. Then once back in town he's told from Elias that Carl knew about the failure of the acquisition. He has had all those suspicions, has had Hopkins on his tail even at the cabin (though Carl knew about the failed deal) and is still looking for confirmations: of what? He has two choices: get rid of Carl or escaping to Vegas.  
 
Quote
Wasn't that just the setup to have Turner try and unsettle him, get him off balance, before trying to kill him?

On the contrary, by arising his suspicions they risk he get hip to the set up and counterattack. I think the Hopkins character is good for creating suspense, but it doesn't make sense in real world.  

Quote
Which finale, the very end where he goes to die sitting one last in his regular spot king of his domain on 5th street?
Sure, what else? So he is wounded by a shot but is still able to fight Hopkins and win. that means the wound is not that bad. So what would you do in his place? Go to a hospital or let yourself die?

Logged

cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12781


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: January 23, 2016, 07:01:59 PM »

But everything is decided before Coop shows softness. Carl amply justifies the dwindling takes, doesn't seem to put the blame on Coop. And Hopkins is introduced at the arena  before the match. So of course the failed set up is not a reason.

It must have been pre decided then, maybe Carl is dealing direct with Elias

Quote

I think that after he's been told that Elias is not at the hotel and there's not reservation in his name he has no reason to remain there if not for those scenes of thrill.

Then he's just kidding himself, rationalizing reasons Elias didn't show, he's in denial.

Quote
Then once back in town he's told from Elias that Carl knew about the failure of the acquisition. He has had all those suspicions, has had Hopkins on his tail even at the cabin (though Carl knew about the failed deal) and is still looking for confirmations: of what? He has two choices: get rid of Carl or escaping to Vegas.

He doesn't have much time to do anything except get Sarah on the train.

Quote

On the contrary, by arising his suspicions they risk he get hip to the set up and counterattack.

Counterattack with what, his warehouse manager? Cooper seems to not have any muscle at all, it's as if he a normal business man desperate to live an ordinary life with Sarah.

Quote
I think the Hopkins character is good for creating suspense, but it doesn't make sense in real world.

He's great for creating suspense, and sending the story into a downward spiral.
 
Quote
Sure, what else? So he is wounded by a shot but is still able to fight Hopkins and win. that means the wound is not that bad. So what would you do in his place? Go to a hospital or let yourself die?

I don't know about that, I buy it, it's a poignant end, he's killed Turner, what chance does he have in a hospital bed, he has no gang and he at least saved Sarah.

If he went to a hospital Sarah would return and be a target along with himself and possibly Paddie too. 

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
titoli
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8010



View Profile
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2016, 08:21:37 PM »

It must have been pre decided then, maybe Carl is dealing direct with Elias

The bodyguard is given the key to the office and shows little respect. That means Coop is no more taken into consideration. What is Carl waiting for? For Turner to make the job. OK. But then he will send Turner to the cabin to know how the deal ended. So did he know about the block deal? Well, then it may be that Turner wanted just to take a chance to kill Coop: but he doesn't when given the chance as they talk outside the cabin. So?

Quote
Then he's just kidding himself, rationalizing reasons Elias didn't show, he's in denial.

That means Coop is an idiot: wonder how he made it up there.

Quote
He doesn't have much time to do anything except get Sarah on the train.

I.e. ample time to get on the train himself.

Quote
Counterattack with what, his warehouse manager? Cooper seems to not have any muscle at all, it's as if he a normal business man desperate to live an ordinary life with Sarah.


Wrong. He has muscle enough to first beat the bodyguard to a hospital and then Turner into the morgue. And, of course, to be number two in a criminal organization.

Quote
He's great for creating suspense, and sending the story into a downward spiral.

Sure. I admitted that. But it has no consistency storywise. If he must kill (as he must) Coop he just has to take the first chance to do so, without all that crappy clowning around.    

Quote
I don't know about that, I buy it, it's a poignant end, he's killed Turner, what chance does he have in a hospital bed, he has no gang and he at least saved Sarah. If he went to a hospital Sarah would return and be a target along with himself and possibly Paddie too.  

You're making your own movie. It may be a poignant end but, unfortunately, it has nothing to do with a character that so far has shown little tendency toward accepting his own demise without struggle: which is, actually, the main theme of the movie. On the contrary, he has done everything to fight each time he thought he was being attacked or just thought so. And of course we expect such behaviour from one who struggled his way to the almost top. If just saving his beloved was his aim, then he could have let himself be killed by Turner. But that thought didn't pass though his mind. Or at least we are not made aware of it.


« Last Edit: January 23, 2016, 08:24:17 PM by titoli » Logged

cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12781


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2016, 04:25:35 AM »

The bodyguard is given the key to the office and shows little respect. That means Coop is no more taken into consideration. What is Carl waiting for? For Turner to make the job. OK. But then he will send Turner to the cabin to know how the deal ended. So did he know about the block deal? Well, then it may be that Turner wanted just to take a chance to kill Coop: but he doesn't when given the chance as they talk outside the cabin. So?

Maybe they are feeling him out to see what he comes up with against them.

Quote
That means Coop is an idiot: wonder how he made it up there.

Yes he's become soft a civilian not a criminal.

Quote
I.e. ample time to get on the train himself.

 He wants to meet Elias first though.

Quote
Wrong. He has muscle enough to first beat the bodyguard to a hospital and then Turner into the morgue. And, of course, to be number two in a criminal organization.

I don't mean physical muscle, I mean muscle as in fellow gang members, he doesn't seem to have anybody to watch his back.
 
Quote
Sure. I admitted that. But it has no consistency storywise. If he must kill (as he must) Coop he just has to take the first chance to do so, without all that crappy clowning around.

It's his shtick the way he operates.  

Quote
You're making your own movie. It may be a poignant end but, unfortunately, it has nothing to do with a character that so far has shown little tendency toward accepting his own demise without struggle: which is, actually, the main theme of the movie. On the contrary, he has done everything to fight each time he thought he was being attacked or just thought so. And of course we expect such behaviour from one who struggled his way to the almost top. If just saving his beloved was his aim, then he could have let himself be killed by Turner. But that thought didn't pass though his mind. Or at least we are not made aware of it.

I don't follow, why not strangle Turner after he took a shot at you, and die with a little dignity on his street.



« Last Edit: January 24, 2016, 04:27:53 AM by cigar joe » Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
titoli
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8010



View Profile
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2016, 07:43:00 AM »

Maybe they are feeling him out to see what he comes up with against them.

You can't have your cake and eat it too. If they have decided to get rid of him because he's become too soft, they proceed.

Quote
Yes he's become soft a civilian not a criminal.

A civilian who can still take action, though. That's what he does through all the movie.

Quote
He wants to meet Elias first though.

Can't he call him on the phone? That's what he did at the start of the movie. And then, what for? Elias didn't keep his word and that should be enough. But assuming he must see him, once he did and truth has come out he must take a decision: get rid of Carl or follow Sarah.

Quote
I don't mean physical muscle, I mean muscle as in fellow gang members, he doesn't seem to have anybody to watch his back.

Like what? It's Carl who, once Turner is kaput, should start worrying. 

Quote
It's his shtick the way he operates.
 

A moronic way, considering the result.

Quote
I don't follow, why not strangle Turner after he took a shot at you, and die with a little dignity on his street.

No, it's me who do not follow. Once he knows the truth (and he knows it after he talks with Elias) he can elope or fight back. I ask you: what if Turner hadn't him wounded? Would he have killed himself after having strangled him?   


[/quote]

Logged

cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12781


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2016, 03:57:15 PM »


No, it's me who do not follow. Once he knows the truth (and he knows it after he talks with Elias) he can elope or fight back. I ask you: what if Turner hadn't him wounded? Would he have killed himself after having strangled him?   


If Turner hadn't wounded him then I say go after Carl.

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
T.H.
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1771



View Profile
« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2017, 01:49:49 PM »

I watched this a while back and I'm with Titoli, but I did find it more entertaining than him - well the first hour. I'd give this a very generous 7 because of Bo Hopkins, the ending and the first half hour. But the stuff at the cabin really brought the whole thing down a couple notches.

I don't know who the costume designer was for this movie but they really fucked up by having Jason Miller's character look like the manager of a Burger King. Not a wise decision.

very very generous 7/10


Logged


Claudia, we need you to appear in LOST COMMAND. It's gonna revolutionize the war genre. What did you think of the script?
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.039 seconds with 20 queries.