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drinkanddestroy
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« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2016, 10:06:46 AM »

Film Director Hector Babenco died on Wednesday.

here is an article on CBS News: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/kiss-of-the-spider-woman-director-hector-babenco-dead-at-70/

and here is an article from AP: http://bigstory.ap.org/article/2b78f0052c5841e5807e780bc86525d6/film-director-hector-babenco-dies-brazil

Film director Hector Babenco dies in Brazil

SAO PAULO (AP) — The Argentine-born Brazilian director nominated for an Oscar for his 1985 film "Kiss of the Spider Woman" has died. Hector Babenco was 70.

Denise Winther of Babenco's HB Films says the director died Wednesday night of a heart attack at Sao Paulo's Sirio-Libanes Hospital.

"Kiss of the Spider Woman" also was nominated for best picture and William Hurt won the Best Actor Oscar

Babenco also directed "Ironweed" with Jack Nicholson and Meryl Streep, who were nominated for best actor and actress Oscars.
 

His last film was "My Hindu Friend" starring Willem Dafoe. It tells the story of a film director close to death.

Babenco is survived by his wife Barbara and daughter Janka.

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« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2016, 11:15:35 AM »

Fyvush Finkel, plastic-faced character actor, dead at 93

RIP

AP: http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_OBIT_FYVUSH_FINKEL?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/15/theater/fyvush-finkel-pillar-of-yiddish-theater-dies-at-93.html?_r=0

LA Times: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/la-et-st-fyvush-finkel-dead-20160814-snap-story.html

Variety: http://variety.com/2016/tv/people-news/fyvush-finkel-dead-picket-fences-boston-public-1201837290/


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« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2016, 03:50:29 PM »

I hand no idea there was a Walk of Fame for Yiddish Theater on 2nd Ave.

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« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2016, 10:05:49 AM »

Steven Hill has passed away  Cry RIP

Famous actor from Mission Impossible, and Law and Order. Later he did TV ads for TD Ameritrade. he had an incredible voice.

He must have just passed away; there aren't any obituaries available yet. For now, here is the intro to the pilot episode of Mission Impossible https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhPwhv2aRZc

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« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2016, 10:28:28 AM »

here is the NY Times obituary on Hill http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/24/arts/television/steven-hill-trailblazing-tv-star-dies-at-94.html?_r=0

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« Reply #20 on: December 08, 2016, 11:53:20 AM »

Adolf Burger died Tuesday at 99. He was one of the Jews forced by the Nazis to produce counterfeit British pounds, in an effort to destabilize the British economy. Burger's wife was killed in Auschwitz; now, more than 70 years later, he'll be reunited with her

Here is a brief article from the Associated Press http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/E/EU_CZECH_OBIT_BURGER?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT

Burger wrote a memoir in 1983, and a movie based on his life was made in 2007. The Austrian-German movie, called "The Counterfeiters," won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0813547/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

has anyone seen this movie? is it good? It has a pretty high rating on IMDB.

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« Reply #21 on: December 08, 2016, 01:08:48 PM »

Adolf Burger died Tuesday at 99.

Killed by the nanny.

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« Reply #22 on: December 15, 2016, 02:49:25 AM »

Feng Tien (kung fu veteran , Fist of Fury)

Wu Ngan (Bruce Lee's butler and co-star , FoF & Way of Dragon)

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« Reply #23 on: December 18, 2016, 03:42:39 PM »

Zsa Zsa Gabor has died. Assumed to be 99

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/18/movies/zsa-zsa-gabor-often-married-actress-known-for-glamour-dies.html?_r=0

RIP

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« Reply #24 on: December 20, 2016, 12:54:08 PM »

Michèle Morgan est morte ce mardi à l'âge de 96 ans.

Drink, buddy, don't do anything drastic.

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« Reply #25 on: December 20, 2016, 02:12:56 PM »

Michèle Morgan est morte ce mardi à l'âge de 96 ans.

Drink, buddy, don't do anything drastic.

 Cry Cry Cry

RIP

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« Reply #26 on: December 20, 2016, 02:14:14 PM »

https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/michele-morgan-lustrous-french-actress-of-port-of-shadows-dies-at-96/2016/12/20/b5e66d78-c6f1-11e6-bf4b-2c064d32a4bf_story.html?utm_term=.1ba44e29d828

The Washington Post

Michèle Morgan, lustrous French actress of ‘Port of Shadows,’ dies at 96
By Adam Bernstein

Michèle Morgan, a French movie actress who starred in the moody masterpiece “Port of Shadows” and who, during a brief Hollywood sojourn, helped introduce Frank Sinatra to film audiences in his first big role, died Dec. 20. She was 96.

The family announced the death, according to French media reports. No other details were provided.

In a career spanning seven decades, Ms. Morgan was best known as the ethereal femme fatale in “Port of Shadows” (1938), a film at the core of the poetic realism movement in French cinema. As visually sumptuous as they were bleak, the movies often involved working-class characters and social outcasts whose destinies are beyond their control — in essence, a precursor to the cynical and sinister world of American film noir.

“Port of Shadows” featured Jean Gabin, the biggest star in France, as an army deserter on the lam in a seedy port of call. He enjoys a passionate interlude with a 17-year-old waif sporting a beret and transparent raincoat (Ms. Morgan) before she ultimately seals his doom through her association with two unsavory underworld figures.

The film was directed by Marcel Carne and written by the surrealist poet and screenwriter Jacques Prévert, the team behind “Daybreak” (1939) and “Children of Paradis” (1945), regarded as examples of French cinema at its most sublime.

Shrouded in fog, squalor and melancholy, “Port of Shadows” is less concerned with the machinery of plot than with conveying a sustained mood of uncompromising bleakness.

Film critic Pauline Kael once called the movie “a breath of fresh air to American filmgoers saturated with empty optimism.” It also launched Ms. Morgan as an international star for the next two decades.

After a further series of dark-lady roles, several opposite her lover Gabin, she spent World War II making movies in the United States. She was stuck in propaganda and espionage fare for RKO Studios, including “Joan of Paris” (1942) with Paul Henreid and “Passage to Marseille” (1944) opposite Humphrey Bogart.

She was a leading contender for the Ingrid Bergman role in “Casablanca” (1942), but RKO demanded a huge loan-out fee that the rival Warner Bros. would not meet. Instead, she appeared in “Higher and Higher” (1943), a musical with Sinatra in which she played a maid impersonating a debutante.

“Why look back?” she told the New York Times a few years later. “I was so young then, so miserable with my poor attempts at English. I used to say ‘crying trees’ for weeping willows. You didn’t mow the lawn. No, you shaved it. And those pictures. Those stinkers.”

By war’s end, she returned to France and immediately reignited her career with “Pastoral Symphony” (1946), based on story by the future Nobel laureate Andre Gide. Ms. Morgan won the best actress award at the Cannes film festival for her portrayal of an orphaned blind girl in love with a married Swiss pastor who also draws the attention of his son.

“Miss Morgan’s performance is an exquisite piece of art — tender, proud, and piteous in its comprehensions of the feelings of the blind,” New York Times film critic Bosley Crowther wrote.

In “The Fallen Idol” (1948), a stylish suspense drama based on a Graham Greene story, Ms. Morgan added vulnerable depths to an otherwise supporting role as the mistress of an embassy butler (Ralph Richardson) who is accused of killing his cruel wife.

Throughout the 1950s, Ms. Morgan remained one of France’s most prominent leading ladies, often in romantic, adulterous and melodramatic parts. She also played many historic roles — as Joan of Arc in “Daughters of Destiny” (1954), Joséphine de Beauharnais in “Napoléon” opposite Daniel Gélin in the title role, and “Marie Antoinette in “Shadow of the Guillotine” (1956).

One of her subtlest performances was as the divorcée who resists but then gives in to a cavalry officer (Gérard Philipe) who romances her on a bet in “The Grand Maneuver” (1955), directed by Rene Clement.

She had a supporting role as a countess in the 1966 war film “Lost Command,” starring Anthony Quinn and Alain Delon, and had a late-stage starring role as a wealthy widow who is a suspect in the killing of her faithless husband in “Cat and Mouse” (1975), a thriller directed by Claude Lelouche.

Simone Renée Roussel was born in the Paris suburb of Neuilly-sur-Seine on Feb. 29, 1920, and grew up mostly in Dieppe. After dramatic study under actor René Simon, she entered films as an extra in the mid-1930s and was spotted by director Marc Allegret, who also guided the early careers of Simone Simon and Jean-Pierre Aumont.

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She became an overnight sensation as a young girl accused of a crime of passion in Allegret’s “Gribouille” (1937) opposite the star, Raimu. She was then raced into “Storm” (1938) as the young woman having a tryst with a businessman played by Charles Boyer. Her seductive charms were then used to first-rate effect in “Port of Shadows.”

Her first marriage, to American actor William Marshall, ended in divorce. Her second husband, French actor Henri Vidal, died in 1959. She then was the companion of director, actor and writer Gérard Oury until his death in 2006.

A son from her first marriage, Mike Marshall, died in 2005. Information about survivors was not immediately available.

Starting in the 1970s, Ms. Morgan became a frequent presence on French television and stage, and she took up painting. Her allure remained intact and incontrovertible, especially as she spoke about “Port of Shadows” and its enduring mystique.

“There was a scene in which I was in the bed, in the bedroom, and Gabin was not in the bed,” she told an interviewer decades after its making. “He was sitting on the bed. Oh, it was very, very modest, it was not something very daring when you compare that sort of thing with what they do now. In fact, that scene was more exciting than what they do now, I suppose, because mystery is a great part in a love scene.”


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« Reply #27 on: December 20, 2016, 02:20:58 PM »

You're best off clicking the links and not just reading the text in the posts; because at the links are some great pics

Hollywood Reporter

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/michele-morgan-french-actress-fallen-idol-dies-at-96-958050

Michele Morgan, French Actress in 'The Fallen Idol,' Dies at 96

By Cheryl Cheng



Michele Morgan, famous for her role in The Fallen Idol, died at her home in Paris on Tuesday, according to her family. In a statement, her family said: "The most beautiful eyes in cinema were permanently closed this morning." She was 96.

Considered one of the greatest actresses of French cinema, Morgan is best known as the girlfriend of an unhappily married butler (Ralph Richardson) whose wife dies accidentally in the 1948 film The Fallen Idol. It was nominated for two Oscars.

Morgan was born Feb. 29, 1920, in Neuilly-sur-Seine as Simone Renee Roussel. She left home when she was 15 to pursue acting and took lessons from Rene Simon, the founder of the Cours Simon drama school in Paris.

Her breakthrough role was in Marc Allegret's 1937 film Heart of Paris, in which she starred opposite Raimu. Allegret also cast her in his 1938 film Storm, but she became a well-known actress when she starred in Marcel Carne's Port of Shadows (1938) with famous French actor Jean Gabin. In Shadows, Gabin tells Morgan, "You have beautiful eyes, you know." To which she replies, "Kiss me." As a result, she became known as the actress with "the most beautiful eyes in cinema." Her 1977 autobiography was entitled With These Eyes.

When Germany invaded France in 1940 during World War II, Morgan fled to the United States, where she was cast in several Hollywood films, including Robert Stevenson's Joan of Paris (1942), Higher and Higher (1943) with Frank Sinatra and Passage to Marseille (1944) with Humphrey Bogart. In 1941 she built a house in Los Angeles at 10050 Cielo Drive, which later became famous as the site of the Manson family murders in 1969.

Returning to France after the war, she continued to work for the next two decades. In 1946, she starred in Jean Delannoy's religious drama Pastoral Symphony, a film about a minister and his son who both fall in love with a blind woman, played by Morgan. For her role, she won the best actress award at the first-ever Cannes Film Festival in 1946.

Her career continued with such highlights as The Fallen Idol; Fabiola (1949); The Glass Castle (1950); The Proud and the Beautiful (1953); Shadow of the Guillotine (1956), in which she stars as Marie Antoinette; and Lost Command (1966).

Morgan has received many awards during her career, including a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1960, France's Legion of Honor in 1969 and an honorary Cesar for her contributions to French cinema in 1992. She also won the Career Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1996. She was voted as the most popular French actress 10 times.

She spent her later years painting and had a solo exhibit in Paris in 2009. "I find calm, I have always liked to be alone, and I have never been happier than with my painting," she has said.

Of her her long, successful acting career, in which has starred in nearly 70 films, Morgan has said: "I have never had the opportunity to play sexy women. I must believe that my charm was not in my ass."

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« Reply #28 on: December 20, 2016, 03:25:49 PM »

rip

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« Reply #29 on: December 27, 2016, 12:49:31 PM »

RIP Carrie Fisher

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/27/movies/carrie-fisher-dead-star-wars-princess-leia.html?_r=0

Carrie Fisher, Child of Hollywood and ‘Star Wars’ Royalty, Dies at 60
By Dave Itzkoff


Ms. Fisher established Princess Leia as a damsel who could very much deal with her own distress, whether facing down the villainy of the dreaded Darth Vader or the romantic interests of the roguish smuggler Han Solo.

Wielding blaster pistols, piloting futuristic vehicles and, to her occasional chagrin, wearing strange hairdos and a revealing metal bikini, she reprised the role in three more films — “The Empire Strikes Back” in 1980, “Return of the Jedi” in 1983 and, 32 years later, “Star Wars: The Force Awakens,” by which time Leia had become a hard-bitten general.

Lucasfilm said on Tuesday that Ms. Fisher had completed her work in an as-yet-untitled eighth episode of the main “Star Wars” saga, which is scheduled to be released in December 2017.

Winning the admiration of countless fans, Ms. Fisher never played Leia as helpless. She had the toughness to escape the clutches of the monstrous gangster Jabba the Hutt and the tenderness to tell Han Solo, as he is about to be frozen in carbonite, “I love you.” (Solo, played by Harrison Ford, caddishly replies, “I know.”)

Offscreen, Ms. Fisher was open about her diagnosis of bipolar disorder. She gave her dueling dispositions the nicknames Roy (“the wild ride of a mood,” she said) and Pam (“who stands on the shore and sobs”). She channeled her struggles with depression and substance abuse into fiercely comic works, including the semiautobiographical novel “Postcards From the Edge” and the one-woman show “Wishful Drinking,” which she turned into a memoir.

For all the attention she received for playing Princess Leia, Ms. Fisher enjoyed poking wicked fun at the character, as well as at the fantastical “Star Wars” universe. “Who wears that much lip gloss into battle?” she asked in a recent memoir, “The Princess Diarist.”

Having seen fame’s light and dark sides, Ms. Fisher did not take it too seriously, or consider it an enduring commodity.

As she wrote in “The Princess Diarist”:

“Perpetual celebrity — the kind where any mention of you will interest a significant percentage of the public until the day you die, even if that day comes decades after your last real contribution to the culture — is exceedingly rare, reserved for the likes of Muhammad Ali.”

Carrie Frances Fisher was born on Oct. 21, 1956, in Beverly Hills, Calif. She was the first child of her highly visible parents (they later had a son, Todd), and said in “Wishful Drinking” that, while her mother was under anesthetic delivering her, her father fainted.

“So when I arrived,” Ms. Fisher wrote, “I was virtually unattended! And I have been trying to make up for that fact ever since.”
Times Talks: Carrie Fisher

Ms. Fisher discussed her life and career, including the legendary Star Wars Holiday Special, with The Times's David Carr as part of the Times Talks series.
By THE NEW YORK TIMES on January 12, 2010. Photo by Chris Pizzello/Associated Press. Watch in Times Video »

In 1959, Ms. Reynolds divorced Eddie Fisher in the wake of his affair with Elizabeth Taylor, whom he married that same year. (Ms. Taylor later left him to marry Richard Burton.)

Any semblance of a normal childhood was impossible for Ms. Fisher. At 15, she played a debutante in the Broadway musical “Irene,” which starred her mother, and appeared in Ms. Reynolds’s Las Vegas nightclub act. At 17, Ms. Fisher made her first movie, “Shampoo” (1975), Hal Ashby’s satire of Nixon-era politics and the libidinous Los Angeles culture of the time, in which she played the precocious daughter of a wealthy woman (Lee Grant) having an affair with a promiscuous hairdresser (Warren Beatty).

She was one of roughly two dozen young actresses considered for the role of Princess Leia in Mr. Lucas’s marathon casting sessions for “Star Wars.” (Cindy Williams, Amy Irving, Sissy Spacek and Jodie Foster were among those who also read for the part.)

Many of Ms. Fisher’s line readings from that film have since become part of the cinematic canon: her repeated, almost hypnotic exhortation, “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi, you’re my only hope”; her wryly unimpressed reaction when Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) arrives in disguise to rescue her from a detention cell: “Aren’t you a little short for a storm trooper?”

“Star Wars” became a financial and cultural phenomenon, launching more movies and a merchandising machine that splashed Ms. Fisher’s likeness on all manner of action figures and products while casting her into an uneasy limelight.

She partied with the Rolling Stones during the making of “The Empire Strikes Back,” hosted “Saturday Night Live” and had romantic relationships with Dan Aykroyd (with whom she appeared in “The Blues Brothers”) and Paul Simon. She and Mr. Simon had a marriage that lasted less than a year, and he was inspired to write his song “Hearts and Bones” about their time together.

As its lyrics go:

    Two people were married
    The act was outrageous
    The bride was contagious
    She burned like a bride.

In “The Princess Diarist,” she admitted what many fans had long suspected: During the filming of the first “Star Wars” movie, she and Harrison Ford (who was married at the time) had an affair.

Ms. Fisher acknowledged taking drugs like LSD and Percodan throughout the 1970s and ’80s and later said that she was using cocaine while making “The Empire Strikes Back.”

In 1985, after filming a role in Woody Allen’s “Hannah and Her Sisters,” she had a nearly fatal drug overdose. She had her stomach pumped and checked herself into a 30-day rehab program in Los Angeles. Those experiences later became grist for her caustic, comic novel “Postcards From the Edge,” whose chapters are variously presented as letters, diary entries, monologues and third-person narratives.

As the main character, Suzanne, writes of her rehab stay: “Mom brought me some peanut butter cookies and a biography of Judy Garland. She told me she thought my problem was that I was too impatient, my fuse was too short, that I was only interested in instant gratification. I said, ‘Instant gratification takes too long.’”

The book was later made into a movie, directed by Mike Nichols from a script by Ms. Fisher. Released in 1990, it starred Meryl Streep as Suzanne and Shirley MacLaine as her movie-star mother.

On film, Ms. Fisher also played the scene-stealing best friend of Meg Ryan’s title character in the 1989 romantic comedy “When Harry Met Sally…” On television, she played satirical versions of herself on shows like “Sex and the City” and “The Big Bang Theory.” She had a recurring role on the British comedy “Catastrophe” (seen here on Amazon) as the mother of the character played by Rob Delaney, one of the show’s creators.

Her survivors include her mother; her brother, Todd; her daughter, Billie Lourd, from a relationship with the talent agent Bryan Lourd; and her half sisters, Joely Fisher and Tricia Leigh Fisher, the daughters of Eddie Fisher and Connie Stevens.

Ms. Fisher had a Dorothy Parker-like presence on Twitter, where she ruminated on the inexplicable mania surrounding “Star Wars” and on her French bulldog, Gary, in playful messages filled with emoji.

Last year, after the release of “The Force Awakens,” she wrote, in part: “Please stop debating about whether OR not [eye emoji] aged well. unfortunately it hurts all 3 of my feelings. My BODY hasn’t aged as well as I have.”

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