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Author Topic: Casablanca (1942)  (Read 6366 times)
drinkanddestroy
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« Reply #30 on: January 08, 2016, 12:21:29 PM »

This is what the french call "pompier" and the americans "corny". It is really embarrassing because it is easily predictable and the degree zero of inventiveness to bring out a tear. A pity the Germans didn't reply with the Horst Wessel Lied: then it would have been fun. One can take seriously these Hollywood shenanigans, of course. Which can also explain  why you are able to report at least 2 masterpieces a week from your visits to multiplex. BTW the movie gives what is probably the worst version of It Had To Be You, sung by somebody to whom nobody told that you must move the fingers to play piano. But at least they had the sense of humor to let him sing a few measures of Shine.

The anthems scene is great IMO, although Henreid's performance in that scene is pretty bad. Obviously, they get a 'real' singer to dub in the voice, but Henreid should have at least pretended he was really singing fervently. He is just sorta sitting there waving his fist very unconvincingly, much less fervently than a man in that situation really would.

As for Bergman vs. Hepburn, it's like Hoegaarden vs. Shock Top. In other words, no comparison. (For all you lucky Europeans, Shock Top is wheat beer made by Budweiser that I presume is shitty though I have never tasted.) Bergman is great and beautiful. Hepburn I can't stand to look at. And IMO this is Bogie's greatest performance. Talk about all-time snubs for Oscar, Paul Lukas beat Bogie for Best Actor! DJ, remember Lukas from CITY STREETS!
And the script of Casablanca is written very well for a great actor to deliver a stellar performance - the cynical, rueful outsider, as Richard Schickel has referred to him - and that is just what Bogie did.

speaking of Sam's piano, it sold at auction a little over a year ago for $3.4 million; and the letters of transit sold for $118,750 http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/25/nyregion/casablanca-piano-to-be-auctioned-at-bonhams.html?_r=0


and the car that Bogie, Rains, Henreid, and Bergman arrive at the airport in, sold at the same auction for $461,000 https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/21427/lot/103/

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« Reply #31 on: January 08, 2016, 04:24:59 PM »

I think the Horst Wessel Lied:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWyK_JU-100

is just as moving as La Marseillaise. Yes, it's a nazi song, but is a good one.
You do not have to make any creative effort to let people be moved because all the work has been done before by those who wrote the songs.Of course they picked up (Die Wacht am Rhein),

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mL2sViclu4A

and let it be sung by all uniformed germans, no civilians: a Hollywood ruse (the Hollywood audiences areslow to get the message, you know). Of course everybody knows the french anthem's strain and few, if any, the german one. Add to that the close-ups of women emotionally taken up, and the female voices singing it. So, of course, who can win the battle in the end?    But what had the german been singing Lili Marlene (In 1941 still a exclusively german song) with some german civilians (isn't it strange there are no german civilians around) in the choir?
This clash of opposites is doctored from the start and it couldn't have been otherwise (though the lyrics of both anthem tell a different story http://intellectquarterly.com/2014/04/24/a-clash-of-the-anthems/). This is Hollywood. And after a hundred years people still fall for these cheap tricks. 

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« Reply #32 on: January 09, 2016, 09:40:02 PM »

They couldn't play the Horst Wessel song cuz of copyright issues.

From wikipedia:

"Particularly notable is the "duel of the songs" between Strasser and Laszlo at Rick's cafe. In the soundtrack, "La Marseillaise" is played by a full orchestra. Originally, the opposing piece for this iconic sequence was to be the "Horst Wessel Lied", a Nazi anthem, but this was still under international copyright in non-Allied countries. Instead "Die Wacht am Rhein" was used. The opening bars of the "Deutschlandlied", the national anthem of Germany, are featured throughout the score as a motif to represent the Germans, much as "La Marseillaise" is used to represent the Allies."

Sorry, titloli, that they didn't play a Nazi-enough song for you. I imagine you must have the Horst Wessel song on your iPod, so you can be moved to tears anytime you wish.

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« Reply #33 on: January 10, 2016, 03:11:07 AM »

They couldn't play the Horst Wessel song cuz of copyright issues.

A pity.

Quote
Sorry, titloli, that they didn't play a Nazi-enough song for you. I imagine you must have the Horst Wessel song on your iPod, so you can be moved to tears anytime you wish.

Not a Nazi-enough, but a good-enough german song. But you're right: i had the Horst Wessel Lied  as the alarm on my cell-phone: a very good sing-along.

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« Reply #34 on: January 10, 2016, 09:26:06 AM »

Not Giovinezza? What would Mussolini say?

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« Reply #35 on: January 10, 2016, 11:52:58 AM »

Not Giovinezza? What would Mussolini say?

Faccetta nera is groovier.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFPlR4jbsDc

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« Reply #36 on: January 10, 2016, 06:32:34 PM »

I am surprised that dj missed the gay subtext here.

Roger Ebert has (in)famously said that Renault is a fudgepacker, and I agree.

I've read some other stuff elsewhere that certain queer groups that interpret every movie as having a gay subtext have said this movie is about gay sexual repression blah blah blah. I think that is bullshit, but IMO it is certainly reasonable to say that Renault is gay, and not out of the question to say there may be somethig between Rick and Sam. There is one moment where Rick is walking out of his office as Sam is playing a song, and Rick gives Sam a pat on the shoulder as he walks by, In a way that men just don't do to other men, unless they are Italian.

Oh, I remember now that Ebert mentioned on commentary that the part of the piano player, in early draft, was to have been played by a woman. Maybe that has to do with the affection Rick has toward Sam. Ebert also commented on how nice it is to see a respectful relationship between the main white character and a black character. Well, maybe there are reasons for that beyond mere racial harmony Wink
(I should emphasize that Ebert never said nor implied anything about Rick or Sam being queer. That was just some shit on some dumbass queer sight I saw linked to on wikipedia before someone removed it, probably for good reason)  Grin

But dj talking about deeper meanings and missing gay subtexts ......... I'm shocked, shocked to learn that there's buttfucking going on here  Shocked

« Last Edit: February 28, 2016, 12:37:32 PM by drinkanddestroy » Logged

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« Reply #37 on: January 10, 2016, 07:13:28 PM »

An intriguing idea and I'm glad you shared it twice! Afro

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« Reply #38 on: January 10, 2016, 07:18:52 PM »


Oops, sorry I had to delete one   Afro Afro

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« Reply #39 on: February 28, 2016, 11:40:47 AM »

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/703900742961270784

 Got to ask him if he likes the Horst Wessel Lied too. According to his ex-wife Ivana his livre de chevet is Hitler's speeches.



BTW, that Mussolini's close-up is not from 1925, but probably from the 40's.

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« Reply #40 on: February 28, 2016, 12:08:05 PM »

Based on his performance so far, this will probably give Trump a ten point bump in the polls.

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« Reply #41 on: February 28, 2016, 12:59:36 PM »

A bump up?

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« Reply #42 on: February 28, 2016, 01:28:38 PM »

If nothing Trump's said or done in the campaign so far has hurt him, I doubt anything will.

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« Reply #43 on: February 28, 2016, 01:40:54 PM »

Let's see if he has the guts to sing the Horst Wessel Lied.

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« Reply #44 on: May 14, 2016, 09:03:29 PM »

The last surviving credit cast member of Casablanca has died  Cry

Vive la France!

https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/madeleine-lebeau-french-actress-who-sang-la-marseillaise-in-casablanca-dies-at-92/2016/05/14/555ccb74-1a34-11e6-924d-838753295f9a_story.html


Madeleine LeBeau, French actress who sang ‘La Marseillaise’ in ‘Casablanca,’ dies at 92

The Washington Post

By Adam Bernstein


Madeleine LeBeau, a French actress who fled Nazi-occupied Europe for Hollywood, where she made the best of a small role as the scorned girlfriend of Humphrey Bogart’s Rick Blaine in “Casablanca,” died May 1 in Estepona, Spain. She was widely reported to be 92.

The cause was complications from a broken thigh bone, her stepson, documentary filmmaker and mountaineer Carlo Alberto Pinelli, told the Hollywood Reporter.

Ms. LeBeau (sometimes credited as Lebeau) was the last surviving credited cast member of “Casablanca” (1942), which the American Film Institute lists — after “Citizen Kane” — as the second greatest movie of all time.

“Casablanca” was intended as wartime propaganda, but it was also a riveting potboiler of romance and intrigue that won Oscars for best picture, director and screenplay. The stars were Bogart, as a cynical American who runs a saloon in Morocco, and Ingrid Bergman as an old flame from Paris who turns up and stirs his pre-war passion.

The rest of the movie was stuffed with first-rate character actors from around the world, including Ms. LeBeau’s then-husband, Marcel Dalio, as Emil the croupier. In one of the movie’s most indelible scenes, he hands over winnings to the corrupt police official Louis Renault (played by Claude Rains) who is “shocked, shocked” to find gambling on the premises.

For Ms. LeBeau, “Casablanca” was the seminal performance of her career. She played Yvonne, the cast-off lover of Bogart’s worldweary Rick.

“Where were you last night?” Yvonne asks.

Rick: “That’s so long ago, I don’t remember.”

Yvonne: “Will I see you tonight?”

Rick: “I never make plans that far ahead.”

Neglected by Rick, a drunken Yvonne steps out with a German soldier. She regains her moral compass back at the nightclub as she hears patrons sing “La Marseillaise” in an attempt to drown out a German patriotic song. Her close-ups are tearful and defiant.

Ms. LeBeau said she hoped “Casablanca” would catapult her to great demand in Hollywood. It did not.

She told Charlotte Chandler, a Bergman biographer, “It wasn’t that I was cut out, it was because they kept changing the script and, each time they changed it, I had less of a part. It wasn’t personal, but I was so disappointed.”

She later played a temperamental French actress in filmmaker Federico Fellini’s Oscar-winning “8 1/2” (1963), which her second husband co-wrote.

Marie Madeleine Berthe LeBeau was born near Paris in the early 1920s — the dates fluctuate between 1921 and 1923. In her teens, she landed a tiny role in a play with Dalio, who was about 20 years her senior and struck by her beauty. They soon married, and Ms. LeBeau made her screen debut in a 1939 drama, “Young Girls in Trouble.”

The next year, they left Paris just hours ahead of the invading German army; Dalio’s image had been used in Nazi posters to identify Jewish-looking features. They made their way to Lisbon and, using what turned out to be forged Chilean visas, booked passage on a Portuguese cargo ship, the Quanza, that was taking more than 300 refugees to the west.

Many of the passengers were not allowed to disembark in New York or the next port-of-call, Vera Cruz, Mexico. However, Dalio and Ms. LeBeau secured temporary Canadian visas in Mexico and made their way to California. (The other passengers received visas through the U.S. State Department when they arrived in Norfolk, Va.)

Dalio, who had prominent roles in filmmaker Jean Renoir’s masterpieces “Grand Illusion” (1937) and “The Rules of the Game” (1939), helped secure work for the couple in Hollywood.

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Ms. LeBeau won a contract at Warner Bros. and had minor roles in “Hold Back the Dawn” (1941), a drama starring Charles Boyer and Olivia de Havilland, and “Gentleman Jim” (1942) with Errol Flynn as the boxing champ James J. Corbett.

Ms. LeBeau’s marriage to Dalio disintegrated during the making of “Casablanca” — he filed suit, claiming desertion — and the studio soon terminated her contract. As a freelancer, she earned supporting roles in the French underground drama “Paris After Dark” (1943) and “Music for Millions,” (1944), a musical with Margaret O’Brien and Jimmy Durante.

After the war, Ms. LeBeau returned to Europe. Reviewing her performance as a singer in “Cage of Gold,” a 1950 English drama starring Jean Simmons, a New York Times critic wrote that Ms. LeBeau seemed “undecided whether to imitate Edith Piaf or storm the Bastille.”

She had a rare leading role in “The Sins of Madeleine” (1951), about a prostitute who uses the ruse of pregnancy to end relationships with men, only to find one of her clients is delighted at the prospect of being a father.

Her film career ended by the late 1960s, and she remained in Rome after making “8 1/2.” In 1988, she wed Italian screenwriter Tullio Pinelli. He died in 2009. A complete list of survivors was not immediately available.


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