Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 10, 2019, 09:29:38 AM
:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  DJ and D&D Go to the Symphony
0 and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7
: DJ and D&D Go to the Symphony  ( 11723 )
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9101

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #75 : October 10, 2018, 11:14:07 AM »

Stolen Stradivarius found after decades comes to life again

https://apnews.com/908cb3c9b3c34de3ab7b3102810c4626


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14584

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #76 : October 10, 2018, 11:42:01 AM »

Cool!



Ya measly skunk! A-campin’ on my trail and lettin’ me do the work an’ then shootin’ me in the back. IN THE BACK!
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9101

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #77 : October 10, 2018, 12:31:25 PM »

I'm in Washington for a few days of intensive international diplomacy with Miss Korea.

We're going to see the National Symphony Orchestra tomorrow night, for 2 Mendelssohn pieces and Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony (No. 6).

http://www.kennedy-center.org/calendar/event/NTCSB

The National Symphony Orchestra plays at the Kennedy Center – the tickets are dirt cheap compared to the New York Philharmonic, and based on the ticket map, the place seems to be half-empty - so you can get great seats even close to the event without being a season subscriber. Two weeks ago, we got a pair of seats in dead center about 18 rows back.

Before the symphony, we'll try to go to the National Zoo and see the pandas – that way I can make Miss Hong Kong jealous in more ways than one ;)


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9101

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #78 : October 21, 2018, 09:10:08 PM »

I went to the symphony the other night with Miss Korea. At the Kennedy Center in Washington, for the National Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Christoph Eschenbach.

Eschenbach was the Director of the NSO from 2010-2017; now Gianandrea Noseda is the Director, but I guess Eschenbach still conducts sometimes.

here is the program: http://www.kennedy-center.org/calendar/event/NTCSB#tickets

Opened with Felix Mendelssohn's "Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage" Overture. It's a nice piece https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8xGiX9utcE

That was followed by Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto, with the young virtuoso Ray Chen. Here is a video from several years ago of Chen performing the same piece https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I03Hs6dwj7E

I'm not much into the violin as a solo instrument, but Miss Korea is, having played the violin in her youth. So I got to know this piece listening to it a bunch of times in the weeks leading up to the show.

Chen got a HUGE HUGE HUGE standing ovation following this piece.

Following intermission, the program closed with one of my favorites, Beethoven's 6th Symphony, the "Pastoral."

(My favorite version of the "Pastoral" is with Michele Merrill conducting the Detroit Symphony Orchestra https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75OMvblyD-Q I like it cuz the first and third movements are fast, which I think is appropriate here.)

The Pastoral got a standard ovation. Eschenbach took his bows, walked off, back on, then walked off for good. Most shows I have been to, the conductor after the show walks off and on a good few times at the end. Here just the once off, on and back off. Maybe he was pissed off that Chen got a much bigger ovation than he did.

Two reviews of the show

https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/at-nso-familiarity-breeds-contentment/2018/10/11/cfd8fd72-cdca-11e8-920f-dd52e1ae4570_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.ba105d5002ff

http://washingtonclassicalreview.com/2018/10/11/chen-provides-the-sparks-in-safety-first-program-from-eschenbach-nso/




« : October 22, 2018, 08:36:24 PM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14584

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #79 : October 22, 2018, 11:38:14 AM »

Thanks for the comments and the links.



Ya measly skunk! A-campin’ on my trail and lettin’ me do the work an’ then shootin’ me in the back. IN THE BACK!
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9101

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #80 : October 22, 2018, 08:41:12 PM »

Thanks for the comments and the links.

Pleasure.

It was pouring that night. We called an Uber, took a while for it to come. Almost everybody had gone home already, we were standing just about alone, when Chen came out the door, carrying his Stradivarius (in the case, of course). I knew Miss Korea would appreciate a picture; I pushed her to ask him, but she refused to, being somewhat shy. So after a few seconds of fruitlessly trying to push her to ask him, I finally walked up to Chen myself and asked if she could get a pic with him. I apologized for making him stand in the rain for those few extra seconds, but he was very friendly and polite, and he posed, so she got the pic with him :)

« : October 23, 2018, 12:54:26 PM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 14584

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


« #81 : October 23, 2018, 10:49:45 AM »

Pleasure.

It was pouring that night. We called an Uber, took a while for it to come. Almost everybody had gone home already, we were standing just about alone, when Chen came out the door, carrying his Stradivarius (in the case, of course). I knew Miss Korea would appreciate a picture; I pushed her to ask him, but she refused to, being somewhat shy. So after a few seconds of fruitlessly trying to push her to ask him, I finally walked up to Chen myself and asked if she could get a pic with him. I apologized for making him stand in the rain for those few extra seconds, but he was very friendly and polite and posed, so she got the pic with him :)
You did it wrong. You should have had her snap the pic of YOU and Chen. She doesn't ask, she doesn't get. And instead you would have had years of opportunity to rub it in: "This could have been you . . . "

Not that you'll have years together, anyway, she's going to be on to you very soon.



Ya measly skunk! A-campin’ on my trail and lettin’ me do the work an’ then shootin’ me in the back. IN THE BACK!
noodles_leone
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5698


Lonesome Billy


« #82 : October 23, 2018, 10:52:32 AM »


Not that you'll have years together, anyway, she's going to be on to you very soon.

You beat me to it.


drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9101

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #83 : November 23, 2018, 02:44:27 PM »

Recently went with Miss Korea to a Schubert/Beethoven show at Lincoln Center: Ivan Fischer guest-conducting the NY Philharmonic in Schubert's 5th symphony, a Schubert "lied" called "The Shepherd on the Rock," and Beethoven's 4th Symphony

https://nyphil.org/concerts-tickets/1819/beethoven-and-schubert (I was at the Saturday night show - sitting 4 rows from the back, but dead-center. Sound was good.)

Schubert's 5th a nice little piece https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfZlTGqtoO8

It uses a very small orchestra: flute, two bassoons, two oboes, two horns, and a small string section (e.g., just two basses).

"The Shepherd on the Rock" – the last piece Schubert wrote before his death at 31 – was written for piano, clarinet, and soprano, but at this concert, Fischer used an orchestration by Carl Reinecke from 1887 – it used the soprano and solo clarinet, but instead of the piano it had a full orchestra. In fact, it was even a bigger orchestra than the one used on the Schubert 5th Symphony – this one used two flutes, two oboes, a clarinet (besides the solo clarinet), two bassoons, four horns, and a larger string section (e.g., four basses).

The soprano was a Swede, Miah Persson; clarinet soloist was Anthony McGill, principal clarinetist for the NY Phil.

Beethoven's 4th Symphony used the biggest orchestration of all (e.g., six basses). The piece is sort of like a joke between the Eroica and the Fifth. The first movement starts with some slow sounds for about two minutes before erupting into a nice vigorous tune. Second movement is slow. The last two movements are like a comedy. This symphony is not very highly regarded, and for good reason IMO.

Maestro Fischer is amazing, as always. The show was enjoyable.

two reviews here

https://www.nationalreview.com/2018/11/concert-review-ivan-fischer-new-york-philharmonic-exceptional/

https://super-conductor.blogspot.com/2018/11/concert-review-it-wouldnt-be-in-summer.html


« : June 01, 2019, 09:40:59 PM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9101

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #84 : January 30, 2019, 11:30:43 AM »

2020 is the 250th anniversary of Beethoven's birth. To celebrate, Carnegie Hall will have a season with lots of Beethoven shows, including (for the first time ever!) two complete cycles of his symphonies  :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

https://www.apnews.com/8e42f121b4e349179d43ff77742f5ec9

http://newyorkclassicalreview.com/2019/01/carnegie-hall-to-fete-beethoven-at-250-in-the-2019-2020-season/

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/30/arts/music/carnegie-hall-beethoven.html

***

Chicago Symphny Orchestra will also celebrate the Beethoven anniversary next season

https://news.wttw.com/2019/01/29/chicago-symphony-orchestra-2019-2020-season-celebrates-beethoven

« : February 07, 2019, 06:26:33 PM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
Cusser
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1705


Remember, I always see the job through !


« #85 : January 30, 2019, 06:56:18 PM »

And re-watch "A Clockwork Orange" !!!

drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9101

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #86 : February 02, 2019, 11:00:17 PM »

The other night I was at Carnegie Hall for “Beethoven for the Rohingya,” a performance of Beethoven’s Ninth, in a benefit concert for the Rohingya.

https://www.carnegiehall.org/Calendar/2019/01/28/Beethoven-for-The-Rohingya-A-Concert-For-the-Rohingya-Refugees-0800PM

The Rohingya are an ethnic minority (mostly Muslim, a minority Hindu) in Myanmar who have faced massive persecution by the Myanmar military government, particularly with a recent wave of human-rights abuses beginning in 2016.
More than 600,000 have crossed the border into Bangladesh since 2017; they are living in refugee camps. More info here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2016_Rohingya_persecution_in_Myanmar

The event was presented by Music for Life International, an organization that seeks to “to create transformative social impact through music for the most vulnerable of our fellow human beings.”
http://www.music4lifeinternational.org/Music_for_Life_International/Home.html


Net proceeds from the concert went to Doctors Without Borders (also known by its French acronym MSF, [Medecins Sans Frontieres]) assisting the Rohingya.

The orchestra was comprised of artists from around 80 orchestras/ensembles/institutions from around the world – including the NY Philharmonic, MET Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra – all of whom were performing for free for this charitable event.

The first piece played was a piece called “Elegy” by 88-year-old American composer David Amram, conducted by Amram himself. (The piece premiered in 1971.) It is a piece for solo violin and orchestra. The solo violinist was Elmira Darvarova; she served as concertmaster (principal first violinist) for Beethoven’s Ninth.


There were several brief speeches during the evening - from the president of MSF, an official from Music for Life International, Amram and George Mathew (more about him below). By far the most moving was a speech by a Rohingya man, who managed to escape Myanmar several decades ago and is now a U.S. citizens, but still has many family members living in danger and oppression in Myanmar. A letter was also read out loud from NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio.

Several of the speakers made mention about being welcoming immigrants/refugees, no doubt a nod to a fierce political debate going on in America. But the event was mostly non-political.

Beethoven’s Ninth was conducted by George Mathew, a Singapore-born Indian conductor who founded Music for Life International and Ubuntu-Shruti Orchestra. Mathew has conducted many benefit concerts for various charitable causes. Since 2006, Mathew has conducted eight charitable concerts at Carnegie Hall alone.

For Beethoven’s Ninth, the choir was Montclair State University Chorale. Indra Thomas was soprano, Sarah Heltzel mezzo-soprano, Sean Panikkar tenor, and Soloman Howard bass.

I went with a friend (it was her first ever symphony – pretty awesome to have Beethoven’s Ninth as her first show!) We had amazing seats – 11 rows back, dead center. We had a great time.

Mathew placed the basses (I think there were 10!) on the far right wall; two were at the lip of the stage, two more on their right, etc., two abreast five rows deep. So the basses started right up front at the stage – and I found it quite distracting how you could hear the bass strings vibrating against the neck, rather than just hearing the “boom boom” sound of the bass. I am not very knowledgeable on classical music, but I have never heard this before. I don’t know if one of the musicians was screwing up, or if this is just because the basses were up front (they’re often by the back wall).

Something really funny happened: During the second movement, Mathew’s baton went flying out of his hand and into the second row of seats! I guess conductors don’t have extra batons lying around, because he conducted the rest of the show with his hands. (Not a big deal – many conductors don’t use batons.) After the show, one of the staff came over to get the baton; he let me hold it and take a selfie! It had a cork handle.

The ovation was long and loud; during the ovation, Mathew spoke again briefly and urged everyone to do something for this important cause.
I took a video of the ovation and speech here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KA2FHVPenW0&feature=youtu.be
This show, with the diverse array of musicians, was neat. I noticed at least one group of
musicians – the bassists – taking selfies and group pics together. After the show, some of the musicians were taking selfies with audience members at
the lip of the stage, or coming down off the stage to do so.

Great show for a great cause!

Donations can be made at http://www.music4lifeinternational.org/Music_for_Life_International/Donate.html


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9101

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #87 : February 07, 2019, 06:27:31 PM »

New York Philharmonic and  just released the 2019-2020 season schedule

https://nyphil.org/concerts-tickets/explore/1920/season-highlights


Lincoln Center's "Great Performers" schedule was also released for 2019-2020

http://lincolncenter.org/great-performers/subscribe#symphonic-masters-1

« : February 07, 2019, 06:30:11 PM drinkanddestroy »

There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9101

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #88 : June 01, 2019, 10:06:46 PM »

I went with a friend last Tuesday to Lincoln Center, the New York Philharmonic, conducted by, Jaap Van Zweden, a Dutchman completing his first season as the orchestra's musical director.

https://nyphil.org/concerts-tickets/1819/beethoven-eroica

The show opened with a Shostakovich chamber symphony https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/String_Quartet_No._8_(Shostakovich)

He originally wrote the piece for a string quartet https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41HIXtBElH4

but Rudolf Barshai later arranged it for chamber symphony; this is the video I watched a bunch of times to get to know the piece https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lkYPD_4O3M

(The quartet is known as Op. 110, and the chamber symphony version as Op. 110a).

The NY Phil version used a much larger orchestra than the one you see in the link above. It was a full-sized orchestra string section. Jaap conducted it more slowly than the version you see in that video.


The headlining piece was Beethoven's 3rd Symphony, known as the Eroica.

Here is a 1966 audio recording of Bernstein playing it with the NY Phil; I've listened to this a million times https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBZzjy8vzMM&list=PLbcerJq8u6IdB4Nac8WMz1dSU1slkGUN-

and here is a great 14-minute audio clip of Bernstein discussing the very famous first movement https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ym1KjscMCLw&list=PLbcerJq8u6IdB4Nac8WMz1dSU1slkGUN-&index=5

The string section for the Eroica was even larger than that used for the Shostakovich piece. Jaap conducted the opening movement of the Eroica at a quick tempo. I liked that  :)

I had great seats - Row U, dead center. I'm not a big fan of that Shostakovich piece; the Eroica's first movement is very famous and good, but the last 3 movements are not particularly good. I don't think I'll go again to that piece. But hey, it's always nice to go to Lincoln Center  :)

This show was played four times over a period of a week; I attended the final showing. Here are reviews following the first showing


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/23/arts/music/new-york-philharmonic-review.html

http://newyorkclassicalreview.com/2019/05/lack-of-fire-makes-for-objective-start-to-philharmonics-music-of-conscience-series/

https://super-conductor.blogspot.com/2019/05/concert-review-music-of-easy-conscience.html

http://www.classicalsource.com/db_control/db_concert_review.php?id=16491


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
drinkanddestroy
Global Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9101

trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders?


« #89 : December 02, 2019, 02:29:24 PM »

$550 million renovation coming to Lincoln Center's David Geffen Hall

it'll mean a reduction of over 500 seats, more expensive tickets, and hopefully better acoustics

https://apnews.com/3237d8fd219344f5bbc288818db9c085

https://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/NY-Philharmonic-Concert-Hall-to-Cut-500-Seats-in-Major-550-Million-Renovation-565689862.html

https://gothamist.com/arts-entertainment/lincoln-center-and-ny-philharmonic-announce-550-million-geffen-hall-renovation


There are three types of people in the world, my friend: those who can add, and those who can't.
: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7  
« previous next »
:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines
0.087145