Sergio Leone Web Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
December 13, 2017, 12:00:57 PM
Home Help Search Calendar Login Register
News:


+  Sergio Leone Web Board
|-+  Other/Miscellaneous
| |-+  Off-Topic Discussion (Moderators: cigar joe, moviesceleton, Dust Devil)
| | |-+  The Fallen Idol (1948) Kid Noir
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: The Fallen Idol (1948) Kid Noir  (Read 520 times)
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12780


easy come easy go


View Profile
« on: February 07, 2017, 03:57:49 AM »



Directed by Carol Reed (Odd Man Out (1947), The Third Man (1949), The Man Between (1953)) and based on the short story "The Basement Room", by Graham Greene. The Screenplay was by Graham Greene with additional dialogue by Lesley Storm and William Templeton. The excellent cinematography was by Georges Périnal (Blood Of A Poet (1932), and the music was by William Alwyn (The Long Memory (1953), A Night To Remember (1958).

The film stars Ralph Richardson (Our Man in Havana (1959)) as Baines, Michèle Morgan (Port of Shadows (1938) Le quai des brumes (original title)) as Julie, Sonia Dresdel (The Clouded Yellow (1950)) as Mrs. Baines, Bobby Henrey as Philippe, Denis O'Dea (Odd Man Out (1947), Niagara (1953)), as Chief Inspector Crowe, and Jack Hawkins (The Cruel Sea (1953)), as Detective Ames.


Philippe (Henrey)

The Fallen Idol tells its story through Philippe, the nine year old son of a French diplomat. His mother has been very sick and with his father's diplomatic duties keeping him often away, Philippe has the run of a huge diplomatic embassy in the off hours.  His fantasy world consists of a pet snake named MacGregor, which he carries with him in the private living area above the palatial great rooms.



His playhouse is the whole of the embassy with its many levels, rooms, and passageways. Philippe spies down upon all, from behind shadowy staircase banisters, through room high windows, and the private resident balconies. Secrets are learned from bits of conversations eavesdropped on phone calls and staying up past his bedtime.



Philippe idolizes Baines his father's butler. Baines keeps the boy entertained with tall tales of his harrowing exploits in Africa, shooting lions in hunting safaris, quelling restless natives, etc., etc. However, Baines is just a fanciful story teller who is unhappily married to a shrew of a wife who keeps the embassy household staff terrorised.


Julie (Morgan ) and Baines (Richardson)


Mrs. Baines (Dredsel) and Baines

Baines is in love with Julie another member of the embassy staff, and when Philippe follows Baines to a cafe after work and finds Baines and Julie together, Baines tells him that Julie is his niece. After Baines has a fight with his wife over Julie, she accidentally falls two stories to her death from a window sill at the end of a landing where she went to spy on Baines and Julie. Her body lays near the bottom of a staircase. Philippe witnessed the beginning of the fight at the top of the stairs, and assumes that Baines has murdered her by pushing her down the stairway. Philippe runs off into Noirsville

Noirsville


























Chief Inspector Crowe (Denis O'Dea) Detective Ames (Jack Hawkins)

When the police investigations begin, Baines tries to keep Julie out of it, and Philippe attempts to help Baines, but all these clumsy evasions and lies only get Baines into hot water with Scotland Yard. It looks like murder.

Richardson's Baine is great as the likeable, efficient, head of the household staff, and he's sort of a surrogate father figure for Philippe. Dresdel as the jealous sourpuss wife is truly vile. Morgan plays Julie both sweet and weepy. Henrey plays the impressionable Philippe to perfection, he is both innocent and trusting, there are no false notes. The rest of the cast are equally enjoyable to watch, the two washer women of the household staff, a London bobby, a lady of the night, and the detectives of Scotland Yard.

The cinematography of the flee in the night through the cobblestone streets of London will remind you of similar sequences in Vienna in The Third Man.

The only other Kids Noir that readily comes to mind is The Window (1949), these two films would make great introductions to children to the Noir style. 8/10

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Dust Devil
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3631


Smoke Tuco, so you can't bullshit!


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2017, 09:33:54 AM »

''Kid noir'', lol, haven't heard that before. Grin

Logged



No matter how cleverly you sneak up on a mirror, the reflection always looks you straight in the eye.
titoli
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8010



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2017, 10:11:34 AM »

''Kid noir'', lol, haven't heard that before. Grin

More to come.

Logged

dave jenkins
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 13704

"One banana, two banana, three banana, four...."


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2017, 11:07:23 AM »

I can't watch this film anymore. The child actor is insufferable.

Logged


That's what you get, Drink, for being such an annoying Melville fanboy.
cigar joe
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 12780


easy come easy go


View Profile
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2017, 03:08:08 PM »

More to come.

For sure  Grin

Logged

"When you feel that rope tighten on your neck you can feel the devil bite your ass"!
Dust Devil
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3631


Smoke Tuco, so you can't bullshit!


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2017, 02:17:22 AM »

Can't wait! Cheesy

Logged



No matter how cleverly you sneak up on a mirror, the reflection always looks you straight in the eye.
Novecento
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1548



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2017, 11:10:23 AM »

I can't watch this film anymore. The child actor is insufferable.

I'd certainly rank Carol Reed's "The Third Man", "Odd Man Out" and "The Fallen Idol" in that order of preference. The ranking is not even close to be honest even though all are great. Just goes to show what an out-and-out masterpiece "The Third Man" is.

Logged
Spikeopath
Guest
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2017, 01:35:24 PM »

It's an absolute jaffa Grin

I'll just piggyback your excellent support with my own review  Afro

It's a great life if you don't weaken.

The Fallen Idol (AKA: The Lost Illusion) is directed by Carol Reed and adapted to a screenplay by Graham Green from his own short story called The Basement Room. Additional dialogue was scripted by Lesley Storm and William Templeton, the music is by William Alwyn and Georges Périnal is the cinematographer. It stars Ralph Richardson, Bobby Henrey, Michèle Morgan, Sonia Dresdel and Denis O'Dea.

Film is told thru the eyes of Phillipe (Henrey), the young son of a diplomat living at the French Embassy in London. With his parents often away from home, Phillipe has latched onto the family butler, Baines (Richardson), for friendship and guidance. Baines regales the boy with fanciful tales of adventure, but in truth Baines himself is unhappy, stuck in a loveless marriage to the shrewish Mrs. Baines (Dresdel). When Bobby happens upon Baines in the company of a young woman named Julie (Morgan), it thrusts the youngster into a world he doesn't understand, and when a tragedy occurs, Bobby is in danger of shattering the friendship between Baines and himself.

The first of Graham Greene's literary works to be directed by the great Carol Reed, The Fallen Idol took some time to come out of The Third Man's shadow and be heralded in its own right. What transpires over 95 minutes is a tight psychological thriller that leaves a lasting image of childhood confusion, disillusionment and the innocence that's lost. Throw into the mix adult secrets, human conundrums and a gripping mystery investigation at its peak, and it's not hard to see why it's such a well revered picture. It's also a film that thrives on dialogue, again not surprising given that Green himself always said it was the best film adaptation of his work, while some of the deep-focus photography from Périnal adds real atmosphere to the proceedings.

Richardson is superb, and he leads a hugely effective cast, where Dresdel is scarily witch like and Henrey, plucked from nowhere to star as the naive boy, paints an indelible portrait of a child struggling to comprehend the mysterious world of the adults around him. In support there is quality thespians such as Bernard Lee and Jack Hawkins. The ending is notably different to that in the original story, and no doubt about it, the original ending would have garnered a different reaction from many. But Greene was happy to change his own source for the screen, so if it's good enough for him then it surely is good enough for us? Certainly time has been kind to The Fallen Idol, it's Hitchcockian feel blended with literary smarts has made it a lasting favourite of critics and fans alike. 8.5/10


Logged
Dust Devil
Moderator
Bounty Killer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3631


Smoke Tuco, so you can't bullshit!


View Profile
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2017, 10:14:32 AM »

I watched this a few weeks ago and forgot to report: good but not great. Perhaps (actually: surely) it was supposed to be viewed through the eyes of the kid but sometimes this gets it a bit over-pushed (not to say forced) in that direction, and a bit naive and not very realistic for today's philosophy of living (then again: diplomats seldom are). Great visuals, solid paste, and remarkable performances from most of the faces.

Yet in the end, from what I remember: the boy never quite loses his admiration for the older man (although a certain level gets scrapped off in the process). No?


(around a) 7.5/10

Logged



No matter how cleverly you sneak up on a mirror, the reflection always looks you straight in the eye.
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  



Visit FISTFUL-OF-LEONE.COM

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.038 seconds with 19 queries.